Search results for 'Warren Hagar' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  5
    John Kekes, Joseph Agassi, Edward Mackinnon, Gerhard D. Wassermann & Warren Hagar (1981). Book Reviews and Critical Studies. [REVIEW] Philosophia 10 (1-2):43-139.
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  2.  0
    Warren A. Hagar (1980). Cognitive Awareness and the LPM. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 40 (4):596-597.
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  3. René Wellek & Austin Warren (1953). Teoría Literaria [Por] René Wellek y Austin Warren. Gredos.
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  4. René Wellek & Austin Warren (1974). Teoría Literaria [Por] René Wellek y Austin Warren. Prólogo de Dámaso Alonso. --. Gredos.
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  5. René Wellek & Austin Warren (1956). Theory of Literature [by] René Wellek and Austin Warren. Harcourt, Brace & World.
     
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  6.  29
    Mary Anne Warren (1997). Moral Status: Obligations to Persons and Other Living Things. Clarendon Press.
    Mary Anne Warren investigates a theoretical question that is at the centre of practical and professional ethics: what are the criteria for having moral status? That is: what does it take to be an entity towards which people have moral considerations? Warren argues that no single property will do as a sole criterion, and puts forward seven basic principles which establish moral status. She then applies these principles to three controversial moral issues: voluntary euthanasia, abortion, and the status (...)
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  7.  45
    James Warren (2004). Facing Death: Epicurus and His Critics. Clarendon Press.
    The ancient philosophical school of Epicureanism tried to argue that death is "nothing to us." Were they right? James Warren provides a comprehensive study and articulation of the interlocking arguments against the fear of death found not only in the writings of Epicurus himself, but also in Lucretius' poem De rerum natura and in Philodemus' work De morte. These arguments are central to the Epicurean project of providing ataraxia (freedom from anxiety) and therefore central to an understanding of Epicureanism (...)
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  8.  9
    Jessica Pierce, Hilde Lindeman Nelson & Karen J. Warren (2002). Feminist Slants on Nature and Health. Journal of Medical Humanities 23 (1):61-72.
    Ecological feminism (or ecofeminism) and feminist bioethics seem to have much in common. They share certain methodological and epistemological concerns, offer similar challenges to traditional philosophy, and take up a number of the same practical issues. The two disciplines have thus far had little or no direct interaction; this is one attempt to begin some conversation and perhaps stimulate some cross-pollination of ideas. The email dialogue engaged an active ecofeminist scholar, Karen Warren, and an active feminist bioethicist, Hilde Nelson, (...)
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  9.  37
    Amit Hagar, To Balance a Pencil on its Tip: On the Passive Approach to Quantum Error Correction.
    Quantum computers are hypothetical quantum information processing (QIP) devices that allow one to store, manipulate, and extract information while harnessing quantum physics to solve various computational problems and do so putatively more efficiently than any known classical counterpart. Despite many ‘proofs of concept’ (Aharonov and Ben–Or 1996; Knill and Laflamme 1996; Knill et al. 1996; Knill et al. 1998) the key obstacle in realizing these powerful machines remains their scalability and susceptibility to noise: almost three decades after their conceptions, experimentalists (...)
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  10.  4
    James Warren (2008). On Defending Socrates. Think 6 (17-18):99-101.
    James Warren responds to Sandis's preceding article.
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  11. Norman Foerster, John Calvin McGalliard, René Wellek, Austin Warren & Wilbur Schramm (eds.) (1941). Literary Scholarship. Chapel Hill, the University of North Carolina Press.
    The study of letters, by Norman Foerster.--Language, by J.C. McGalliard.--Literary history, by René Wellek.--Literary criticism, by Austin Warren.--Imaginative writing, by W.L. Schramm.--Notes.--Bibliography (p. 239-255).
     
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  12. Langdon Gilkey, Mark L. Kleinman, Colm Mckeogh & Heather A. Warren (2003). A Theological Study. Journal of Religious Ethics 31 (3):487-505.
    Recent studies of Reinhold Niebuhr's life and work demonstrate his continued importance in theology, ethics, and political thought. Historical studies by Heather Warren, Mark Kleinman, and Normunds Kamergrauzis provide new assessments of Niebuhr's role as a political and religious leader in his own time and trace the consequences of the movements in which he participated. They also show us more clearly how his work was connected to the ideas and programs of his contemporaries. Colm McKeogh offers a more systematic (...)
     
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  13. Nicolas de Warren (2009). Husserl and the Promise of Time: Subjectivity in Transcendental Phenomenology. Cambridge University Press.
    This book provides an extensive treatment of Husserl's phenomenology of time-consciousness. Nicolas de Warren uses detailed analysis of texts by Husserl, some only recently published in German, to examine Husserl's treatment of time-consciousness and its significance for his conception of subjectivity. He traces the development of Husserl's thinking on the problem of time from Franz Brentano's descriptive psychology, and situates it in the framework of his transcendental project as a whole. Particular discussions include the significance of time-consciousness for other (...)
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  14.  9
    Scott Warren (1984). The Emergence of Dialectical Theory: Philosophy and Political Inquiry. University of Chicago Press.
    Scott Warren’s ambitious and enduring work sets out to resolve the ongoing identity crisis of contemporary political inquiry. In the Emergence of Dialectical Theory, Warren begins with a careful analysis of the philosophical foundations of dialectical theory in the thought of Kant, Hegel, and Marx. He then examines how the dialectic functions in the major twentieth-century philosophical movements of existentialism, phenomenology, neomarxism, and critical theory. Numerous major and minor philosophers are discussed, but the emphasis falls on two of (...)
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  15.  4
    Ali F. Ünal, Danielle E. Warren & Chao C. Chen (2012). The Normative Foundations of Unethical Supervision in Organizations. Journal of Business Ethics 107 (1):5-19.
    As research in the areas of unethical and ethical leadership grows, we note the need for more consideration of the normative assumptions in the development of constructs. Here, we focus on a subset of this literature, the “dark side” of supervisory behavior. We assert that, in the absence of a normative grounding, scholars have implicitly adopted different intuitive ethical criteria, which has contributed to confusion regarding unethical and ethical supervisory behaviors as well as the proliferation of overlapping terms and fragmentation (...)
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  16. Mary Anne Warren (2009). On the Moral and Legal Status of Abortion. In Steven M. Cahn (ed.), The Monist. Oxford University Press 43-61.
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  17.  62
    Thomas W. Dunfee & Danielle E. Warren (2001). Is Guanxi Ethical? A Normative Analysis of Doing Business in China. Journal of Business Ethics 32 (3):191 - 204.
    This paper extends the discussion of guanxi beyond instrumental evaluations and advances a normative assessment of guanxi. Our discussion departs from previous analyses by not merely asking, Does guanxi work? but rather Should corporations use guanxi? The analysis begins with a review of traditional guanxi definitions and the changing economic and legal environment in China, both necessary precursors to understanding the role of guanxi in Chinese business transactions. This review leads us to suggest that there are distinct types of, and (...)
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  18. Karen J. Warren (1990). The Power and the Promise of Ecological Feminism. Environmental Ethics 12 (2):125-146.
    Ecological feminism is the position that there are important connections-historical, symbolic, theoretical-between the domination of women and the domination of nonhuman nature. I argue that because the conceptual connections between the dual dominations of women and nature are located in an oppressive patriarchal conceptual framework characterized by a logic of domination, (1) the logic of traditional feminism requires the expansion of feminism to include ecological feminism and (2) ecological feminism provides a framework for developing a distinctively feminist environmental ethic. I (...)
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  19.  23
    Danielle E. Warren, Thomas W. Dunfee & Naihe Li (2004). Social Exchange in China: The Double-Edged Sword of Guanxi. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 55 (4):355 - 372.
    We present two studies that examine the effects of guanxi on multiple social groups from the perspective of Chinese business people. Study 1 (N = 203) tests the difference in perceived effects of six guanxi contextualizations. Study 2 (N = 195) examines the duality of guanxi as either helpful or harmful to social groups, depending on the contextualization. Findings suggest guanxi may result in positive as well as negative outcomes for focal actors and the aggregate.
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  20. Amit Hagar (2014). Demons in Physics. [REVIEW] Metascience 23 (2):1-10.
    In their book The Road to Maxwell's Demon Hemmo & Shenker re-describe the foundations of statistical mechanics from a purely empiricist perspective. The result is refreshing, as well as intriguing, and it goes against much of the literature on the demon. Their conclusion, however, that Maxwell's demon is consistent with statistical mechanics, still leaves open the question of why such a demon hasn't yet been observed on a macroscopic scale. This essay offers a sketch of what a possible answer could (...)
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  21. Daniel Warren (2010). Kant on Attractive and Repulsive Force : The Balancing Argument. In Michael Friedman, Mary Domski & Michael Dickson (eds.), Discourse on a New Method: Reinvigorating the Marriage of History and Philosophy of Science. Open Court
  22.  37
    Danielle E. Warren & William S. Laufer (2009). Are Corruption Indices a Self-Fulfilling Prophecy? A Social Labeling Perspective of Corruption. Journal of Business Ethics 88 (4):841 - 849.
    Rankings of countries by perceived corruption have emerged over the past decade as leading indicators of governance and development. Designed to highlight countries that are known to be corrupt, their objective is to encourage transparency and good governance. High rankings on corruption, it is argued, will serve as a strong incentive for reform. The practice of ranking and labeling countries "corrupt," however, may have a perverse effect. Consistent with Social Labeling Theory, we argue that perceptual indices can encourage the loss (...)
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  23. Amit Hagar, Thou Shalt Not Commute!
    For many among the scientifically informed public, and even among physicists, Heisenberg's uncertainty principle epitomizes quantum mechanics. Nevertheless, more than 86 years after its inception, there is no consensus over the interpretation, scope, and validity of this principle. The aim of this chapter is to offer one such interpretation, the traces of which may be found already in Heisenberg's letters to Pauli from 1926, and in Dirac's anticipation of Heisenberg's uncertainty relations from 1927, that stems form the hypothesis of finite (...)
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  24.  66
    Karen J. Warren (1987). Feminism and Ecology: Making Connections. Environmental Ethics 9 (1):3-20.
    The current feminist debate over ecology raises important and timely issues about the theoretical adequacy of the four leading versions of feminism-liberal feminism, traditional Marxist feminism, radical feminism, and socialist feminism. In this paper I present a minimal condition account of ecological feminism, or ecofeminism. I argue that if eco-feminism is true or at least plausible, then each of the four leading versions of feminism is inadequate, incomplete, or problematic as a theoretical grounding for eco-feminism. I conclude that, if eco-feminism (...)
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  25. Daniel Warren (1998). Kant and the Apriority of Space. Philosophical Review 107 (2):179-224.
    In interpretations of the "Transcendental Aesthetic" section of the first Critique, there is a widespread tendency to present Kant as establishing that the representation of space is a condition for individuating or distinguishing objects, and to claim that it is on this basis that Kant establishes the apriority of this representation. The aim of this paper is to criticize this way of interpreting the "Aesthetic," and to defend an alternative interpretation. On this alternative, questions about the formation of the representation (...)
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  26.  1
    Steve Awodey & Michael A. Warren, Predicative Algebraic Set Theory.
    In this paper the machinery and results developed in [Awodey et al, 2004] are extended to the study of constructive set theories. Specifically, we introduce two constructive set theories BCST and CST and prove that they are sound and complete with respect to models in categories with certain structure. Specifically, basic categories of classes and categories of classes are axiomatized and shown to provide models of the aforementioned set theories. Finally, models of these theories are constructed in the category of (...)
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  27. Amit Hagar (2014). Discrete or Continuous? The Quest for Fundamental Length in Modern Physics. Cambridge University Press.
    A book on the notion of fundamental length, covering issues in the philosophy of math, metaphysics, and the history and the philosophy of modern physics, from classical electrodynamics to current theories of quantum gravity. Published (2014) in Cambridge University Press.
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  28.  73
    Amit Hagar (2008). Length Matters: The Einstein–Swann Correspondence and the Constructive Approach to the Special Theory of Relativity. Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 39 (3):532-556.
    I discuss a rarely mentioned correspondence between Einstein and Swann on the constructive approach to the special theory of relativity, in which Einstein points out that the attempts to construct a dynamical explanation of relativistic kinematical effects require postulating a fundamental length scale in the level of the dynamics. I use this correspondence to shed light on several issues under dispute in current philosophy of spacetime that were highlighted recently in Harvey Brown’s monograph Physical Relativity, namely, Einstein’s view on the (...)
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  29.  20
    Djordjija Petkoski, Danielle E. Warren & William S. Laufer (2009). Collective Strategies in Fighting Corruption: Some Intuitions and Counter Intuitions. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (4):815 - 822.
    This article explores the plausibility of some intuitions and counter intuitions about the anti-corruption efforts of MDBs and international organizations leveraging the power of the private sector. Regulation of a sizable percentage of global private sector actors now falls into a new area of international governance with innovative institutions, standards, and programs. We wrestle with the role and value of private sector partnerships and available informal and formal social controls. Crafting proportional informal controls (e.g., monitoring, evaluations, and sanctions) and proper (...)
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  30.  58
    Daniel J. Simons, Deborah E. Hannula, David E. Warren & Steven W. Day (2007). Behavioral, Neuroimaging, and Neuropsychological Approaches to Implicit Perception. In Philip David Zelazo, Morris Moscovitch & Evan Thompson (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness. Cambridge
  31. Amit Hagar (2012). Decoherence: The View From the History and the Philosophy of Science. Phil. Trans. Royal Soc. London A 375 (1975).
    We present a brief history of decoherence, from its roots in the foundations of classical statistical mechanics, to the current spin bath models in condensed matter physics. We analyze the philosophical import of the subject matter in three different foundational problems, and find that, contrary to the received view, decoherence is less instrumental to their solutions than it is commonly believed. What makes decoherence more philosophically interesting, we argue, are the methodological issues it draws attention to, and the question of (...)
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  32. Amit Hagar (2008). Kant and Non-Euclidean Geometry. Kant-Studien 99 (1):80-98.
    It is occasionally claimed that the important work of philosophers, physicists, and mathematicians in the nineteenth and in the early twentieth centuries made Kant’s critical philosophy of geometry look somewhat unattractive. Indeed, from the wider perspective of the discovery of non-Euclidean geometries, the replacement of Newtonian physics with Einstein’s theories of relativity, and the rise of quantificational logic, Kant’s philosophy seems “quaint at best and silly at worst”.1 While there is no doubt that Kant’s transcendental project involves his own conceptions (...)
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  33. Amit Hagar (2005). Discussion: The Foundations of Statistical Mechanics--Questions and Answers. Philosophy of Science 72 (3):468-478.
    Huw Price (1996, 2002, 2003) argues that causal-dynamical theories that aim to explain thermodynamic asymmetry in time are misguided. He points out that in seeking a dynamical factor responsible for the general tendency of entropy to increase, these approaches fail to appreciate the true nature of the problem in the foundations of statistical mechanics (SM). I argue that it is Price who is guilty of misapprehension of the issue at stake. When properly understood, causal-dynamical approaches in the foundations of SM (...)
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  34.  86
    Amit Hagar (forthcoming). Review of M. Thalos' "Without Hierarchy". [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
  35. Amit Hagar & Giuseppe Sergioli (2015). Counting Steps: A Finitist Interpretation of Objective Probability in Physics. Epistemologia 37 (2):262-275.
    We propose a new interpretation of objective deterministic chances in statistical physics based on physical computational complexity. This notion applies to a single physical system (be it an experimental set--up in the lab, or a subsystem of the universe), and quantifies (1) the difficulty to realize a physical state given another, (2) the 'distance' (in terms of physical resources) from a physical state to another, and (3) the size of the set of time--complexity functions that are compatible with the physical (...)
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  36.  84
    Mary Anne Warren (1989). The Moral Significance of Birth. Hypatia 4 (3):46 - 65.
    Does birth make a difference to the moral rights of the fetus/infant? Should it make a difference to its legal rights? Most contemporary philosophers believe that birth cannot make a difference to moral rights. If this is true, then it becomes difficult to justify either a moral or a legal distinction between late abortion and infanticide. I argue that the view that birth is irrelevant to moral rights rests upon two highly questionable assumptions about the theoretical foundations of moral rights. (...)
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  37.  45
    Amit Hagar (2009). Minimal Length in Quantum Gravity and the Fate of Lorentz Invariance. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 40 (3):259-267.
    Loop quantum gravity predicts that spatial geometry is fundamentally discrete. Whether this discreteness entails a departure from exact Lorentz symmetry is a matter of dispute that has generated an interesting methodological dilemma. On one hand one would like the theory to agree with current experiments, but, so far, tests in the highest energies we can manage show no such sign of departure. On the other hand one would like the theory to yield testable predictions, and deformations of exact Lorentz symmetry (...)
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  38.  49
    Amit Hagar (2003). A Philosopher Looks at Quantum Information Theory. Philosophy of Science 70 (4):752-775.
    Recent suggestions to supply quantum mechanics (QM) with realistic foundations by reformulating it in light of quantum information theory (QIT) are examined and are found wanting by pointing to a basic conceptual problem that QIT itself ignores, namely, the measurement problem. Since one cannot ignore the measurement problem and at the same time pretend to be a realist, as they stand, the suggestions to reformulate QM in light of QIT are nothing but instrumentalism in disguise.
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  39.  36
    James Warren (2002). Epicurus and Democritean Ethics: An Archaeology of Ataraxia. Cambridge University Press.
    The Epicurean philosophical system has enjoyed much recent scrutiny, but the question of its philosophical ancestry remains largely neglected. It has often been thought that Epicurus owed only his physical theory of atomism to the fifth-century BC philosopher Democritus, but this study finds that there is much in his ethical thought which can be traced to Democritus. It also finds important influences on Epicurus in Democritus' fourth-century followers such as Anaxarchus and Pyrrho, and in Epicurus' disagreements with his own Democritean (...)
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  40. Amit Hagar (2014). Squaring the Circle: Gleb Wataghin and the Prehistory of Quantum Gravity. Studies in the History and the Philosophy of Modern Physics 46 (2):217-227.
    The early history of the attempts to unify quantum theory with the general theory of relativity is depicted through the work of the under--appreciated Italo-Brazilian physicist Gleb Wataghin, who is responsible for many of the ideas that the quantum gravity community is entertaining today.
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  41.  34
    Steve Awodey & Michael A. Warren, Homotopy Theoretic Models of Identity Types.
    Quillen [17] introduced model categories as an abstract framework for homotopy theory which would apply to a wide range of mathematical settings. By all accounts this program has been a success and—as, e.g., the work of Voevodsky on the homotopy theory of schemes [15] or the work of Joyal [11, 12] and Lurie [13] on quasicategories seem to indicate—it will likely continue to facilitate mathematical advances. In this paper we present a novel connection between model categories and mathematical logic, inspired (...)
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  42. Mary Anne Warren (2000). The Moral Difference Between Infanticide and Abortion: A Response to Robert Card. Bioethics 14 (4):352–359.
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  43. Amit Hagar (2012). Veiled Realism? Review of B d'Espagnat's On Physics and Philosophy. [REVIEW] Physics in Perspective (x).
  44.  24
    James Warren (2011). Socrates And The Patients: Republic IX, 583c-585a. Phronesis 56 (2):113-137.
    Republic IX 583c-585a presents something surprisingly unusual in ancient accounts of pleasure and pain: an argument in favour of the view that there are three relevant hedonic states: pleasure, pain, and an intermediate. The argument turns on the proposal that a person's evaluation of their current state may be misled by a comparison with a prior or subsequent state. The argument also refers to `pure' and anticipated pleasures. The brief remarks in the Republic may appear cursory or clumsy in comparison (...)
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  45.  53
    Amit Hagar & Meir Hemmo (2006). Explaining the Unobserved: Why Quantum Theory Ain't Only About Information. Foundations of Physics 36 (9):1295-1234.
    A remarkable theorem by Clifton, Bub and Halvorson (2003) (CBH) characterizes quantum theory in terms of information--theoretic principles. According to Bub (2004, 2005) the philosophical significance of the theorem is that quantum theory should be regarded as a ``principle'' theory about (quantum) information rather than a ``constructive'' theory about the dynamics of quantum systems. Here we criticize Bub's principle approach arguing that if the mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics remains intact then there is no escape route from solving the measurement (...)
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  46.  5
    Jeanne Warren (2006). Blair's Guru. The Philosophers' Magazine 36 (36):41-44.
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  47.  87
    Amit Hagar (2007). Experimental Metaphysics2: The Double Standard in the Quantum-Information Approach to the Foundations of Quantum Theory. Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 38 (4):906-919.
    Among the alternatives of non-relativistic quantum mechanics (NRQM) there are those that give different predictions than quantum mechanics in yet-untested circumstances, while remaining compatible with current empirical findings. In order to test these predictions, one must isolate one’s system from environmental induced decoherence, which, on the standard view of NRQM, is the dynamical mechanism that is responsible for the ‘apparent’ collapse in open quantum systems. But while recent advances in condensed-matter physics may lead in the near future to experimental setups (...)
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  48. Amit Hagar (2010). Review of Simon Saunders, Jonathan Barrett, Adrian Kent, David Wallace (Eds.), Many Worlds? Everett, Quantum Theory, and Reality. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (10).
    Hugh Everett III died of a heart attack in July 1982 at the age of 51. Almost 26 years later, a New York Times obituary for his PhD advisor, John Wheeler, mentioned him and Richard Feynman as Wheeler’s most prominent students. Everett’s PhD thesis on the relative state formulation of quantum mechanics, later known as the “Many Worlds Interpretation”, was published (in its edited form) in 1957, and later (in its original, unedited form) in 1973, and since then has given (...)
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  49.  63
    Amit Hagar (2002). Thomas Reid and Non-Euclidean Geometry. Reid Studies 5 (2):54-64.
    In the chapter “The Geometry of Visibles” in his ‘Inquiry into the Human Mind’, Thomas Reid constructs a special space, develops a special geometry for that space, and offers a natural model for this geometry. In doing so, Reid “discovers” non-Euclidean Geometry sixty years before the mathematicians. This paper examines this “discovery” and the philosophical motivations underlying it. By reviewing Reid’s ideas on visible space and confronting him with Kant and Berkeley, I hope, moreover, to resolve an alleged impasse in (...)
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  50.  4
    V. Warren (1990). Ethical Obligation Arising From Routine Screening. Journal of Medical Ethics 16 (1):54-55.
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