29 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
Wayne C. Booth [31]Wayne Booth [5]
  1. Wayne C. Booth (2010). The Knowing Most Worth Doing: Essays on Pluralism, Ethics, and Religion. University of Virginia Press.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Wayne C. Booth (2006). My Many Selves: The Quest for a Plausible Harmony. Utah State University Press.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Wayne C. Booth, Dudley Barlow, Orson Scott Card, Anthony Cunningham, John Gardner, Marshall Gregory, John J. Han, Jack Harrell, Richard E. Hart, Barbara A. Heavilin, Marianne Jennings, Charles Johnson, Bernard Malamud, Toni Morrison, Georgia A. Newman, Joyce Carol Oates, Jay Parini, David Parker, James Phelan, Richard A. Posner, Mary R. Reichardt, Nina Rosenstand, Stephen L. Tanner, John Updike, John H. Wallace, Abraham B. Yehoshua & Bruce Young (2005). Ethics, Literature, and Theory: An Introductory Reader. Sheed & Ward.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Richard P. McKeon & Wayne C. Booth (2005). Selected Writings of Richard Mckeon, Volume Two: Culture, Education, and the Arts. University of Chicago Press.
    Together, the writings in this book show how McKeon reinvented the ancient arts of rhetoric, grammar, logic, and dialectic for the new circumstances of a global culture.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Wayne Booth (2004). To: All Who Care About the Future of Criticism. Critical Inquiry 30 (2):350-354.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. A. Aquinas, Robert Audi, Martin Bickman, Wayne C. Booth, Gregory G. Colomb, Joseph M. Williams, Mario Bunge, Steven M. Cahn, Lawrence Cahoone & Dennis Carlson (2003). Books for Review and for Listing Here Should Be Addressed to Emily Zakin, Review Editor, Department of Philosophy, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056. Teaching Philosophy 26 (2).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Wayne Booth (2003). To the Future Editors of Critical Inquiry. Critical Inquiry 30.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Wayne C. Booth (2002). The Ethics of Medicine, as Revealed in Literature. In Rita Charon & Martha Montello (eds.), Stories Matter: The Role of Narrative in Medical Ethics. Routledge. 10--20.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Wayne C. Booth (1998). Introducing Professor Mearsheimer to His Own University. Philosophy and Literature 22 (1):174-178.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Wayne C. Booth (1998). Why Banning Ethical Criticism is a Serious Mistake. Philosophy and Literature 22 (2):366-393.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Wayne C. Booth (1995). Our Best Rhetorologist. Philosophy and Literature 19 (1):116-126.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Wayne C. Booth (1992). Criticism as the Pursuit of Character. Journal of Medical Humanities 13 (2):67-78.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Wayne C. Booth (1991). Love's Knowledge: Essays on Philosophy and Literature (Review). Philosophy and Literature 15 (2):302-310.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Wayne Booth (1988). The Company We Keep. University of California Press.
    Wayne C. Booth argues for the relocation of ethics to the center of our engagement with literature.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Wayne C. Booth (1988). Why Ethical Criticism Fell on Hard Times. Ethics 98 (2):278-293.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Wayne C. Booth (1986). Pluralism in the Classroom. Critical Inquiry 12 (3):468.
    At my university we never stop reforming the curriculum, and we’re now discussing the plurality of ways in which our students fulfill our requirement of a full year of “freshman humanities.” Some of us feel that we now provide too many ways: neither students nor faculty members can make a good defense of a requirement—in itself an expression of power, if you will—that leads to scant sharing of readings or subject matters for the students, and to no goals or methods (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Wayne C. Booth (1985). Reply to Richard Berrong. Critical Inquiry 11 (4):697.
    At first I thought Richard Berrong’s claim was only that I had misread Rabelais. My main point was not about Rabelais but about how, in general, we might deal with sexist classics. But it remains true that if Berrong has caught me misreading—and then condemning—“bits” torn from their context, I have violated my own professed standards. He and I both see Rabelais as a very great author, and we both hope to avoid the pointlessness of judging works, great or small, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Wayne C. Booth (1983). Book Review:Metaphors We Live By. George Lakoff, Mark Johnson. [REVIEW] Ethics 93 (3):619-.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Wayne C. Booth (1982). Freedom of Interpretation: Bakhtin and the Challenge of Feminist Criticism. Critical Inquiry 9 (1):45.
    In turning to the language of freedom, I am not automatically freed from the dangers of reduction and self-privileging. "Freedom" as a term is at least as ambiguous as "power" . When I say that for me all questions about the politics of interpretation begin with the question of freedom, I can either be saying a mouthful or saying nothing at all, depending on whether I am willing to complicate my key term, "freedom," by relating it to the language of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Wayne C. Booth (1982). Lakoff, George, and Johnson, Mark, "Metaphors We Live". [REVIEW] Ethics 93:619.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Wayne C. Booth (1978). Metaphor as Rhetoric: The Problem of Evaluation. Critical Inquiry 5 (1):49.
    What I am calling for is not as radically new as it may sound to ears that are still tuned to positivist frequencies. A very large part of what we value as our cultural monuments can be thought of as metaphoric criticism of metaphor and the characters who make them. The point is perhaps most easily made about the major philosophies. Stephen Pepper has argued, in World Hypotheses,1 that the great philosophies all depend on one of the four "root metaphors," (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Wayne C. Booth (1978). Ten Literal "Theses". Critical Inquiry 5 (1):175.
    Because my paper was often metaphorical, some participants on the symposium expressed puzzlement about my literal meaning, especially about the passage from Mailer. Here are ten literal "theses" that the paper either argues for, implies, or depends on.1. What metaphor is can never be determined with a single answer. Because the word has now become subject to all of the ambiguities of our notions about similarity and difference, the irreducible plurality of philosophical views of how similarities and differences relate will (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Wayne C. Booth (1977). "Preserving the Exemplar": Or, How Not to Dig Our Own Graves. Critical Inquiry 3 (3):407.
    At first thought, our question of the day seems to be "about the text itself." Is there, in all texts, or at least in some texts, what Abrams calls "a core of determinate meanings," "the central core of what they [the authors] undertook to communicate"? Miller has seemed to find in the texts of Nietzsche a claim that there is not, that "the same text authorizes innumerable interpretations: There is no 'correct' interpretation. . . . reading is never the objective (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Rene Wellek, Wayne Booth, Joseph F. Ryan & Jean H. Hagstrum (1977). Notes and Exchanges. Critical Inquiry 4 (1):203.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Wayne C. Booth (1976). M. H. Abrams: Historian as Critic, Critic as Pluralist. Critical Inquiry 2 (3):411.
    When M. H. Abrams published a defense, in 1972, of "theorizing about the arts,"1 some of his critics accused him, of falling into subjectivism. He had made his case so forcefully against "the confrontation model of aesthetic criticism," and so effectively argued against "simplified" and "invariable" models of the art work and of "the function of criticism," that some readers thought he had thrown overboard the very possibility of a rational criticism tested by objective criteria. In his recent reply to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Wright Morris & Wayne C. Booth (1976). The Writing of Organic Fiction: A Conversation. Critical Inquiry 3 (2):387.
    MORRIS: But come back to that other kind of fiction, in which the author himself is involved with his works, not merely in writing something for other people but in writing what seems to be necessary to his conscious existence, to his sense of well-being. For such a writer, when he finished with something he finishes with it; he is not left with continuations that he can go on knitting until he runs out of yarn. This conceit reflects my own (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Wayne C. Booth (1975). Irony and Pity Once Again: "Thais" Revisited. Critical Inquiry 2 (2):327.
    Mad about it they still were, in 1926, when Hemingway's splendid spoofing appeared in The Sun Also Rises. But it was not everybody who had been responsible. It was mainly Anatole France, abetted by his almost unanimously enthusiastic critics. And of all his works, the one that must have seemed to fit the formula best was Thaïs, already a quarter of a century old when Jake Barnes learned of irony and pity. It is not a bad formula for the effect (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Wayne C. Booth (1974). Kenneth Burke's Way of Knowing. Critical Inquiry 1 (1):1.
    Kenneth Burke is, at long last, beginning to get the attention he de- serves. Among anthropologists, sociologists, psychologists, and rhetori- cians his "dramatism" is increasingly recognized as something that must at least appear in one's index, whether one has troubled to understand him or not. Even literary critics are beginning to see him as not just one more "new critic" but as someone who tried to lead a revolt against "narrow formalism" long before the currently fashionable explosion into the "extrinsic" (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Wayne C. Booth (1974). Modern Dogma and the Rhetoric of Assent. University of Chicago Press.
    When should I change my mind? What can I believe and what must I doubt? In this new "philosophy of good reasons" Wayne C. Booth exposes five dogmas of modernism that have too often inhibited efforts to answer these questions.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation