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Wayne Hall [22]Wayne D. Hall [1]
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Profile: Wayne Hall (State University of New York (SUNY))
  1. Bang Nguyen Pham, Wayne Hall, Peter S. Hill & Chalapati Rao, Analysis of Socio-Political and Health Practices Influencing Sex Ratio at Birth in Viet Nam.
    Viet Nam has experienced rapid social change over the last decade, with a remarkable decline in fertility to just below replacement level. The combination of fertility decline, son preference, antenatal sex determination using ultrasound and sex selective abortion are key factors driving increased sex ratios at birth in favour of boys in some Asian countries. Whether or not this is taking place in Viet Nam as well is the subject of heightened debate. In this paper, we analyse the nature and (...)
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  2. Brad Partridge & Wayne Hall (forthcoming). Repeated Head Injuries in Australia's Collision Sports Highlight Ethical and Evidential Gaps in Concussion Management Policies. Neuroethics:1-7.
    Head injuries (including concussion) are an inherent risk of participating in the major collision sports played in Australia (rugby league, rugby union and Australian Rules football). Protocols introduced by the governing bodies of these sports are ostensibly designed to improve player safety but do not prevent players suffering from repeated concussions. There is evidence that repeated traumatic brain injuries increase the risk of developing a number of long term problems but scientific and popular debates have largely focused on whether there (...)
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  3. Stephanie Bell, Adrian Carter, Rebecca Mathews, Coral Gartner, Jayne Lucke & Wayne Hall (2014). Views of Addiction Neuroscientists and Clinicians on the Clinical Impact of a 'Brain Disease Model of Addiction'. Neuroethics 7 (1):19-27.
    Addiction is increasingly described as a “chronic and relapsing brain disease”. The potential impact of the brain disease model on the treatment of addiction or addicted individuals’ treatment behaviour remains uncertain. We conducted a qualitative study to examine: (i) the extent to which leading Australian addiction neuroscientists and clinicians accept the brain disease view of addiction; and (ii) their views on the likely impacts of this view on addicted individuals’ beliefs and behaviour. Thirty-one Australian addiction neuroscientists and clinicians (10 females (...)
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  4. Adrian Carter, Rebecca Mathews, Stephanie Bell, Jayne Lucke & Wayne Hall (2014). Control and Responsibility in Addicted Individuals: What Do Addiction Neuroscientists and Clinicians Think? Neuroethics 7 (2):205-214.
    Impaired control over drug use is a defining characteristic of addiction in the major diagnostic systems. However there is significant debate about the extent of this impairment. This qualitative study examines the extent to which leading Australian addiction neuroscientists and clinicians believe that addicted individuals have control over their drug use and are responsible for their behaviour. One hour semi-structured interviews were conducted during 2009 and 2010 with 31 Australian addiction neuroscientists and clinicians (10 females and 21 males; 16 with (...)
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  5. Carla Meurk, Adrian Carter, Wayne Hall & Jayne Lucke (2014). Public Understandings of Addiction: Where Do Neurobiological Explanations Fit? Neuroethics 7 (1):51-62.
    Developments in the field of neuroscience, according to its proponents, offer the prospect of an enhanced understanding and treatment of addicted persons. Consequently, its advocates consider that improving public understanding of addiction neuroscience is a desirable aim. Those critical of neuroscientific approaches, however, charge that it is a totalising, reductive perspective–one that ignores other known causes in favour of neurobiological explanations. Sociologist Nikolas Rose has argued that neuroscience, and its associated technologies, are coming to dominate cultural models to the extent (...)
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  6. Carla Meurk, Jayne Lucke & Wayne Hall (2014). A Bio-Social and Ethical Framework for Understanding Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders. Neuroethics 7 (3):337-344.
    The diagnosis of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders is embedded in a matrix of biological, social and ethical processes, making it an important topic for crossdisciplinary social and ethical research. This article reviews different branches of research relevant to understanding how FASD is identified and defined and outlines a framework for future social and ethical research in this area. We outline the character of scientific research into FASD, epidemiological discrepancies between reported patterns of maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy and the incidence (...)
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  7. Bradley Partridge & Wayne Hall (2014). Conflicts of Interest in Recommendations to Use Computerized Neuropsychological Tests to Manage Concussion in Professional Football Codes. Neuroethics 7 (1):63-74.
    Neuroscience research has improved our understanding of the long term consequences of sports-related concussion, but ethical issues related to the prevention and management of concussion are an underdeveloped area of inquiry. This article exposes several examples of conflicts of interest that have arisen and been tolerated in the management of concussion in sport (particularly professional football codes) regarding the use of computerized neuropsychological (NP) tests for diagnosing concussion. Part 1 outlines how the recommendations of a series of global protocols for (...)
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  8. Stephanie Bell, Brad Partridge, Jayne Lucke & Wayne Hall (2013). Australian University Students' Attitudes Towards the Acceptability and Regulation of Pharmaceuticals to Improve Academic Performance. Neuroethics 6 (1):197-205.
    There is currently little empirical information about attitudes towards cognitive enhancement - the use of pharmaceutical drugs to enhance normal brain functioning. It is claimed this behaviour most commonly occurs in students to aid studying. We undertook a qualitative assessment of attitudes towards cognitive enhancement by conducting 19 semi-structured interviews with Australian university students. Most students considered cognitive enhancement to be unacceptable, in part because they believed it to be unethical but there was a lack of consensus on whether it (...)
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  9. Wayne Hall, Brad Partridge & Jayne Lucke (2013). Constraints on Regulatory Options for Putatively Cognitive Enhancing Drugs. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (7):35-37.
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  10. Adrian Carter & Wayne Hall (2012). Avoiding Selective Ethical Objections to Nudges. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (2):12-14.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 12-14, February 2012.
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  11. Adrian Carter, Polly Ambermoon & Wayne D. Hall (2011). Drug-Induced Impulse Control Disorders: A Prospectus for Neuroethical Analysis. Neuroethics 4 (2):91-102.
    There is growing evidence that dopamine replacement therapy (DRT) used to treat Parkinson’s Disease can cause compulsive behaviours and impulse control disorders (ICDs), such as pathological gambling, compulsive buying and hypersexuality. Like more familiar drug-based forms of addiction, these iatrogenic disorders can cause significant harm and distress for sufferers and their families. In some cases, people treated with DRT have lost their homes and businesses, or have been prosecuted for criminal sexual behaviours. In this article we first examine the evidence (...)
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  12. Adrian Carter, Emily Bell, Eric Racine & Wayne Hall (2011). Ethical Issues Raised by Proposals to Treat Addiction Using Deep Brain Stimulation. Neuroethics 4 (2):129-142.
    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been proposed as a potential treatment of drug addiction on the basis of its effects on drug self-administration in animals and on addictive behaviours in some humans treated with DBS for other psychiatric or neurological conditions. DBS is seen as a more reversible intervention than ablative neurosurgery but it is nonetheless a treatment that carries significant risks. A review of preclinical and clinical evidence for the use of DBS to treat addiction suggests that more animal (...)
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  13. Wayne Hall, Jonathan Finnoff, Jayne Lucke & Brad Partridge (2011). Begging Important Questions About Cognitive Enhancement, Again. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (1):14 - 15.
  14. Brad Partridge, Jayne Lucke & Wayne Hall (2011). In the Face of Uncertainty About the Risks of Low-Level Drinking, Abstinence Is Prudent, Not Misogynistic, Advice. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (12):66-67.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 12, Page 66-67, December 2011.
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  15. Adrian Carter, Perry Bartlett & Wayne Hall (2009). Scare-Mongering and the Anticipatory Ethics of Experimental Technologies. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (5):47-48.
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  16. Wayne Hall & Coral Gartner (2009). Direct-to-Consumer Genome-Wide Scans: Astrologicogenomics or Simple Scams? American Journal of Bioethics 9 (6):54-56.
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  17. Brad Partridge, Wayne Hall, Jayne Lucke, Mair Underwood & Helen Bartlett (2009). Mapping Community Concerns About Radical Extensions of Human Life Expectancy. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (12):4-5.
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  18. Brad Partridge, Mair Underwood, Jayne Lucke, Helen Bartlett & Wayne Hall (2009). Ethical Concerns in the Community About Technologies to Extend Human Life Span. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (12):68-76.
    Debates about the ethical and social implications of research that aims to extend human longevity by intervening in the ageing process have paid little attention to the attitudes of members of the general public. In the absence of empirical evidence, conflicting assumptions have been made about likely public attitudes towards life-extension. In light of recent calls for greater public involvement in such discussions, this target article presents findings from focus groups and individual interviews which investigated whether members of the general (...)
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  19. Adrian Carter & Wayne Hall (2007). The Social Implications of Neurobiological Explanations of Resistible Compulsions. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):15 – 17.
    The authors comments on several articles on addiction. Research suggests that addicted individuals have substantial impairments in cognitive control of behavior. The authors maintain that a proper study of addiction must include a neurobiological model of addiction to draw the attention of bioethicists and addiction neurobiologists. They also state that more addiction neuroscientists like S. E. Hyman are needed as they understand the limits of their research. Accession Number: 24077921; Authors: Carter, Adrian 1; Email Address: adrian.carter@uq.edu.au Hall, Wayne 1; Affiliations: (...)
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  20. William Grey, Wayne Hall & Adrian Carter (2007). Persons and Personification. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):57-58.
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  21. Wayne Hall & Adrian Carter (2007). Debunking Alarmist Objections to the Pharmacological Prevention of Ptsd. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (9):23 – 25.
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  22. Wayne Hall (2003). Addiction, Neuroscience and Ethics. Addiction 98 (7):867-870.
    If one believes that the brain is, in some as yet unspecified way, the organ of mind and behaviour, then all human behaviour has a neurobiological basis. Neuroscience research over the past several decades has provided more specific reasons for believing that many addictive phenomena have a neurobiological basis. The major psychoactive drugs of dependence have been shown to act on neurotransmitter systems in the brain (Nutt 1997; Koob 2000); common neurochemical mechanisms underlie many of the rewarding effects of these (...)
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  23. Wayne Hall (1987). Disease Costs and the Allocation of Health Resources. Bioethics 1 (3):211–225.
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