Search results for 'Wei Han' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Xiaocheng Han (2005). Ke Xue Mian Lin Wei Ji: Xian Dai Ke Ji de Ren Wen Fan Si. Zhongguo She Hui Chu Ban She.score: 360.0
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  2. Qipeng Wei (2004). Mawangdui Han Mu Bo Shu "Huang di Shu" Jian Zheng. Zhonghua Shu Ju.score: 360.0
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  3. Zhan Shi, Aibao Zhou, Wei Han & Peiru Liu (2011). Effects of Ownership Expressed by the First-Person Possessive Pronoun. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):951-955.score: 240.0
  4. Cha-gyŏng Han (2008). Hanʼguk Chʻŏrhak Ŭi Maek. Ihwa Yŏja Taehakkyo Chʻulpʻanbu.score: 180.0
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  5. Sŭng-jo Han (1976). Hanʼguk Minjujuŭi Wa Chŏngchʻi Palchŏn.score: 180.0
     
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  6. Qingxiang Han (2011). Han Qingxiang Lun Wen Xuan. Zhonghua Shu Ju.score: 180.0
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  7. Chong-man Han (2009). Pulgyo Wa Han'guk Sasang. Pulgyo Ch'unch'usa.score: 180.0
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  8. Myŏn-hŭi Han (2009). Tong Asia Ŭi Munmyŏng Kwa Han 'Guk Ŭi Saengt'aejuŭi =. Ch'ŏrhak Kwa Hyŏnsilsa.score: 180.0
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  9. Dunyou Wei (2010). Dang Dai Zhongguo Fa Zhe Xue de Shi Ming: Wei Dunyou Jiao Shou Fa Zhe Xue Jiang Yan Lu. Fa Lü Chu Ban She.score: 180.0
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  10. Zhengtong Wei (2005). Wei Zhengtong Zi Xuan Ji. Shandong Jiao Yu Chu Ban She.score: 180.0
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  11. Cairu Bai (2007). Dao Jiao Sheng Tai Si Xiang de Xian Dai Jie Du: Liang Han Wei Jin Nan Bei Chao Dao Jiao Yan Jiu. She Hui Ke Xue Wen Xian Chu Ban She.score: 120.0
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  12. Huaixin Huang (ed.) (2011). Han Jin Kong Shi Jia Xue Yu "Wei Shu" Gong An. Xiamen da Xue Chu Ban She.score: 120.0
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  13. Fang Jun (2006). The Demonstration of Classic in Two Han Dynasties and The Pregnance of Philosophy in Wei and Jin Dynasties. Modern Philosophy 2:014.score: 120.0
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  14. Achim Mittag & Min & Ye (2008). Empire on the Brink: From the Demise of the Han Dynasty to the Fall of the Liang Dynasty. Notes on Chinese Historiography in the Wei-Jin-Nanbeichao Period. In Fritz-Heiner Mutschler & Achim Mittag (eds.), Conceiving the Empire: China and Rome Compared. Oup Oxford.score: 120.0
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  15. Weishan (2011). Shuo Yi Qie You Bu Zhi Chan Ding Lun Yan Jiu: Yi Fan Wen "Ju She Lun" Ji Qi Fan Han Zhu Shi Wei Ji Chu = Dhyāna-Samāpatti in Sarvāstivāda Abhidharma. Zhongguo Ren Min da Xue Chu Ban She.score: 120.0
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  16. Mingsheng Xue (2007). Xian Qin Liang Han Dao Jia Si Wei Yu Shi Jian. Wen Jin Chu Ban She You Xian Gong Si.score: 120.0
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  17. Haichun Zeng (2008). Liang Han Wei Jin Zhe Xue Shi. Wu Nan Tu Shu Chu Ban Gu Fen You Xian Gong Si.score: 120.0
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  18. Wang Cheng-P'ing & Ting Wei-Chih (1969). Comrade Wu Han's Antiparty, Antisocialist, Anti-Marxist Political Thinking and Academic Viewpoints. Chinese Studies in History 3 (1):49-85.score: 36.0
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  19. Han Yin (2005). Laozi Wei Dao. Gansu Wen Hua Chu Ban She.score: 36.0
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  20. Alejandro Bárcenas (2013). Han Fei's Enlightened Ruler. Asian Philosophy 23 (3):236-259.score: 24.0
    In this essay I revise, based on the notion of theenlightened ruleror mingzhu and his critique of the literati of his time, the common belief (...)
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  21. Alejandro Bárcenas (2012). Xunzi and Han Fei on Human Nature. International Philosophical Quarterly 52 (2):135-148.score: 24.0
    It is commonly accepted that Han Fei studied under Xunzi sometime during the late third century BCE. However, there is surprisingly little dedicated to the in-depth (...)study of the relationship between Xunzis ideas and one of his best-known followers. In this essay I argue that Han Feis notion of xing, commonly translated as human nature, was not only influenced by Xunzi but also that it is an important feature of his political philosophy. (shrink)
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  22. Eric Hutton (2008). Han Feizi's Criticism of Confucianism and its Implications for Virtue Ethics. Journal of Moral Philosophy 5 (3):423-453.score: 24.0
    Several scholars have recently proposed that Confucianism should be regarded as a form of virtue ethics. This view offers new approaches to understanding not only Confucian thinkers, (...)
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  23. David Elstein (2011). Han Feizi's Thought and Republicanism. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (2):167-185.score: 24.0
    Feizis philosophy is usually represented as an amoral autocracy where the ruler is the sole political power and runs the state by controlling the people through (...)rewards and punishments. While his system is formally autocratic, this article argues that the purpose behind this system bears some similarity to the republican political ideal of non-domination. In this interpretation, Han Feizi makes the ruler the sole power to mitigate the danger of the state being dominated by ministers. He does not employ republican institutions, but attempts to discourage the ruler from using his power capriciously in order to increase order and security in the state, which are his ultimate political values. Han Feizi is not a republican, but this similarity suggests that when revised for todays very different circumstances, Han Feizian philosophys focus on impartial law can make a contribution to contemporary Chinese political thought. (shrink)
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  24. David Chai (2009). Musical Naturalism in the Thought of Ji Kang. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (2):151-171.score: 24.0
    Wei-Jin period is characterized by neo-Daoism ( xuanxue 玄學), and J I Kang lived in the midst of this philosophical exploration. Adopting the naturalism of the (...)Zhuangzi , J i Kang expressed his socio-political concerns through the medium of music, which was previously regarded as having moral bearing and rectitude. Denying such rectitude became central for J i Kang, who claimed that music was incapable of possessing human emotion, releasing it from the chains of Confucian ritualism. His investigation into the name and reality of musical expression gave music anaesthetic turnlacking in Qin and early Han thought, and by making use of concepts such as natural harmony and spontaneity, J i Kang was able to turn away from the negative aesthetics of earlier thinkers such as H e Yan and W ang Bi to one cherishing the naturalism espoused by Zhuangzi. (shrink)
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  25. Chunfeng Jin (2010). A Reconsideration of the Characteristics of Song-Ming Li Xue. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (3):352-376.score: 24.0
    By analyzing Zhu Xi and Zhang Zai’s three representative explanatory paradigms—that of Feng Youlan, Mou Zongsan and Zhang Dainian, the paper tries to show that studying (...) Chinese philosophy in a Western way and emphasizing logical consistency will unavoidably lead to the defects of simplicity and partiality. In addition to Buddhism and Daoism, Song-Ming philosophy had also absorbed thoughts from the Pre-Qin, Han, Wei and Jin dynasties. The existence of multiple philosophical thoughts and their new synthesis lead to internal contradictions in Song-Ming philosophy and Li Xue 理学 (Neo-Confucianism in the Song and Ming dynasties). The contradiction between the doctrine of tiandao 天道 (the way in which the world runs) and that of xinxing 心性 (mind and human nature) was even sharper. Li Xue and Xin Xue also overlapped one another. The transition from the doctrine of tiandao to that of xinxing was a long journey. It was begun by Zhu Xi in his later years, and was finally completed by Wang Yangming. Unveiling the complexity and special characteristics of Song-Ming philosophy is a task for scholars on the history of Chinese philosophy. (shrink)
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  26. James D. Sellmann (1999). The Origin and Role of the State According to the Li Shi Chunqiu. Asian Philosophy 9 (3):193 – 218.score: 24.0
    To study the L shi chunqiu (or L -shih ch'un-ch'iu. Master L 's Spring and Autumn Annals is to enter into the tumultuous but progressive (...)
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  27. Chang-Hee Son (2000). Haan (Han, Han) of Minjung Theology and Han (Han, Han) of Han Philosophy: In the Paradigm of Process Philisophy and Metaphysics of Relatedness. University Press of America.score: 24.0
    For Pyun, Minjung theology is a "religion-neglect" and indigenization theology or han philosophy is "politics-neglect." However, he conceded that ...
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  28. Henrique Schneider (2013). Han Fei, De, Welfare. Asian Philosophy 23 (3):260-274.score: 24.0
    This paper explores the relation of order and welfare for Han Fei's philosophy. It will be claimed that the Legalist did indeed show concern for the (...)overall quality of life of society, claiming that his model state would lead to a substantial increase for the individual's welfare. On the other hand, although he acknowledges (and cares) for these positive consequences, Han Fei does not attach any value for legitimizing the system he proposes to them. Even if there were any value attached to benefitting the people, it would be indirect. For Han Fei, a welfare does not legitimize the system but is a consequence of theright system’. He is not concerned with letting the people live better for the sake of the people, but rather with having healthy and motivated subjects, as these are at the same time consequences of, and requirements for, a strong and stable state. The novelty of this paper is to interpret Han Fei's philosophy as welfare-maximization through a specific understanding of the role of virtue. (shrink)
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  29. Aloysius P. Martinich (2014). Political Theory and Linguistic Criteria in Han Feizi's Philosophy. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (3):379-393.score: 24.0
    Han Feizis 韓非子 thought, I argue, contains a political theory that justifies principled, law-governed government. A key element of his theory is a solution to the (...) problem of rectifying names. He recognized that the same word can have varying criteria of application depending on the purpose of the practice that requires a criterion. Some criteria for a practice are good and some bad. A wise ruler knows which criteria are good and appropriate to ruling. His view is illuminated by considering the phenomenon of paradiastole and a contemporary view about the relationship between meaning and criteria of application. (shrink)
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  30. Qizhi Zhang (ed.) (2007). Zhongguo Si Xiang Xue Shuo Shi. Guangxi Shi Fan da Xue Chu Ban She.score: 24.0
    [v. 1-2] Xian Qin juan -- [v. 3] Qin Han juan -- [v. 4] Wei Jin Nan Bei chao juan -- [v. 5] Sui Tang juan -- [v. 6- (...)7] Song Yuan juan -- [v. 8-9] Ming Qing juan. (shrink)
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  31. Dawei Zhu (ed.) (2006). Cha Tu Ben Zhongguo Gu Dai Si Xiang Shi. Guangxi Ren Min Chu Ban She.score: 24.0
    [v. 1] Xian Qin juan -- [v. 2] Qin Han juan -- [v. 3] Wei Jin Nan Bei Chao juan -- [v. 4] Sui Tang Wu Dai juan -- [v (...). 5] Song Liao Xi Xia Jin Yuan juan -- [v. 6] Ming Qing juan. (shrink)
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  32. Hans‐Otto Hügel (2004). Weißt Du wieviel Sterne stehen?“Zu Begriff, Funktion und Geschichte des Stars. In Claudia Bullerjahn & Wolfgang Löffler (eds.), Musikermythen: Alltagstheorien, Legenden Und Medieninszenierungen. Olms. 265--293.score: 22.0
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  33. Roger Boesche (2005). Han Feizi's Legalism Versus Kautilya's Arthashastra. Asian Philosophy 15 (2):157 – 172.score: 18.0
    Writing only decades apart, Han Feizi (ca. 250 BCE) and Kautilya (ca. 300 BCE) were two great political thinkers who argued for strong leaders, king or emperor, (...)
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  34. Paul R. Goldin (2001). Han Fei's Doctrine of Self-Interest. Asian Philosophy 11 (3):151 – 159.score: 18.0
    Chapter 49 of the Han Feizi, entitled 'Wudu' ('The Five Vermin'), includes one of the earliest discussions in Chinese history of the concepts of gong and si: (...)
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  35. Edward G. Slingerland (2003). Effortless Action: Wu-Wei as Conceptual Metaphor and Spiritual Ideal in Early China. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    This book presents a systematic account of the role of the personal spiritual ideal of wu-wei--literally "no doing," but better rendered as "effortless action"--in early (...)
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  36. Valérie de Prycker (2011). Unself-Conscious Control: Broadening the Notion of Control Through Experiences of Flow and Wu-Wei. Zygon 46 (1):5-25.score: 18.0
    Abstract. This paper both clarifies and broadens the notion of control and its relation to the self. By discussing instances of skillful absorption from different cultural backgrounds, (...)
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  37. Wonsuk Chang (2012). Ch'Oe Han-Gi's Confucian Philosophy of Experience: New Names for Old Ways of Thinking. Philosophy East and West 62 (2):186-196.score: 18.0
    In this article, it is argued that Ch'oe Han-gi (1803-1877), a Korean Confucian scholar from the late Chosŏn, can be credited with finding the full (...)
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  38. Winnie Sung (2012). Sun, Wei 孫偉, Reconstruction of Confucianism: A Re-Examination of Xunzi's Thought 重塑儒家之道荀子思想再考察. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (1):109-113.score: 18.0
    Sun, Wei 孫偉, Reconstruction of Confucianism: A Re-Examination of Xunzis Thought 重塑儒家之道荀子思想再考察 Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-5 DOI 10.1007/s11712-011-9260-z Authors (...)
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  39. Peter R. Moody (1979). The Legalism of Han Fei-Tzu and Its Affinities with Modern Political Thought. International Philosophical Quarterly 19 (3):317-330.score: 18.0
    The legalism of han fei-Tzu has affinities with much of modern political thought, Particularly in its denial of an objective morality. Because legalism is modernism unmoralized, (...)It shows clearly some of the less savory implications of the truisms we accept. Han fei's ideas are interesting in their own right, But it is also interesting to see these ideas in a comparative setting, That we might gain a broader understanding of modern political thought, Both of its merits and its limitations. (shrink)
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  40. Rui Zhu (2002). Wu-Wei: Lao-Zi, Zhuang-Zi and the Aesthetic Judgement. Asian Philosophy 12 (1):53 – 63.score: 18.0
    The concept of wu-wei (nonaction) has undergone significant changes from Lao-zi to Zhuang-zi. This paper will argue that, while wu-wei in Lao-zi is a (...) utilitarian principle, wu-wei of Zhuan-zi represents an aesthetic world-view. The aesthetic nature of the Daoist nonaction will be illustrated through Kant's concept of 'purposiveness without purpose'. (shrink)
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  41. Shiling Xiang (2010). Inquiry Into the Transcendence of Tang Dynasty Confucians to Han Dynasty Confucians and the Transformation of Traditional Confucianism in Terms of Lunyu Bijie. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (4):471-485.score: 18.0
    Neo-Confucianism of the Han and Tang dynasties is an indispensable part of the history of Chinese philosophy. From Han dynasty Confucians to Tang dynasty Confucians, the (...)study of Confucian classics evolved progressively from textual research to conceptual explanation. A significant sign of this transformation is the book Lunyu Bijie 论语笔解 (A Written Explanation of the Analects), co-authored by Han Yu and Li Ao. Making use of the tremendous room for interpretation within the Analects, the book studied and reorganized the relationship between the study of literature and the Dao and principles. It clearly shows an inevitable development of Confucianism, shifting its focus from phenomena to the nature of the heart-mind in order to comprehend nature and heavenly Dao, both of which cannot be heard (from Confucius). (shrink)
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  42. Ken Wilber, On the Nature of a Post-Metaphysical Spirituality Response to Habermas and Weis.score: 18.0
    The publication of Jurgen Habermas's Nachmetaphysisches Denken (Post-Metaphysical Thinking) and the publication of a Hans-Willi Weis article about my work prompted several people in Germany (...)
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  43. Wiebke Denecke (2010). The Dynamics of Masters Literature: Early Chinese Thought From Confucius to Han Feizi. Distributed by Harvard University Press.score: 18.0
    Introduction: Chinese philosophy and the translation of disciplines -- The faces of masters literature until the Eastern Han -- Scenes of instruction and master bodies in the Analects -- (...)
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  44. Denis Dutton, Han Van Meegeren.score: 18.0
    The most notorious and celebrated forger of the twentieth century, Han van Meegeren (1889-1947), was born in the Dutch town of Deventer. He was fascinated by (...)drawing as a child, and pursued it despite his fathers disapproval, sometimes spending all his pocket money on art supplies. In high school he was able finally to receive professional instruction, and went on to study architecture, according to his fathers wishes. In 1911 he married Anna de Voogt. His artistic talents were recognized when he soon after won first prize and a gold medal from the General Sciences Section of the Delft Institute of Technology for a drawing of a church interior. He agreed to sell this drawing, but was discovered by his wife making a copy of it to sell as the original. She dissuaded him from carrying out this small swindle, but the incident is the first evidence of an interest in faking, even if in this case the artist was merely forging his own prize-winning work. (shrink)
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  45. Eirik Lang Harris (2014). Legalism: Introducing a Concept and Analyzing Aspects of Han Fei's Political Philosophy. Philosophy Compass 9 (3):155-164.score: 18.0
    Legalismis a term that has long been used to categorize a group of early Chinese philosophers including, but not limited to, Han Fei (Han Feizi), Shen (...)
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  46. Zhaolu Lu (2001). Fiduciary Society and Confucian Theory of Xin - on Tu Wei-Ming's Fiduciarity Proposal. Asian Philosophy 11 (2):85 – 101.score: 18.0
    This paper evaluates Tu Wei-ming's proposal that the Confucian ideal model of human society should be viewed as a fiduciary community. To do the evaluation, I (...) provide a systematic elaboration of Tu's proposal, which is essentially absent in Tu's writings, and a systematic explication of the Confucian theory of fiduciarity, which is supposed to be the theoretical foundation of Tu's proposal but is completely absent in the studies of Confucianism, including Tu's own. On the basis of these studies, I conclude that the notion of fiduciary community is entailed by the Confucian tradition; tapping the resource of the Confucian tradition for appreciating, supporting and justifying a properly defined model of fiduciary society is practically relevant and important to the modern world; however, given Tu's own definition, the model of fiduciary community does not sufficiently characterise the Confucian ideal society. In the end, I suggest a new way to study Confucian social ideals. (shrink)
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  47. Eske Møllgaard (2007). Is Tu Wei-Ming Confucian? Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (4):397-411.score: 18.0
    Wei-ming’s discourse has been badly understood by some Western philosophers who study Confucianism. I suggest that this misunderstanding stems from the fact that these philosophers fail (...) to realize that Confucian discourse is in an entirely different register from Western philosophical discourse. I then propose my own preliminary definition of Confucian discourse in five points and present a structural analysis of a text by Tu Wei-ming. Finally, I consider which features of Tu’s discourse can properly be called Confucian. The answer to this question reflects not only on Tu but also on Confucian discourse and the study of Confucianism in general. (shrink)
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  48. Soon-Ja Yang (2012). Song, Hongbing 宋洪兵, New Studies of Han Feizi's Political Thought 韓非子政治思想再硏究. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (263):266.score: 18.0
    Song, Hongbing 宋洪兵, New Studies of han Feizis Political Thought 韓非子政治思想再硏究 Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-4 DOI 10.1007/s11712-012-9265-2 Authors Soon-ja Yang (...), Inha University, 253 Yonghyeon 4-dong, Nam-gu, Incheon, South Korea 402-751 Journal Dao Online ISSN 1569-7274 Print ISSN 1540-3009. (shrink)
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  49. Changchi Hao (2006). Wu-Wei and the Decentering of the Subject in Lao-Zhuang. International Philosophical Quarterly 46 (4):445-457.score: 18.0
    This essay attempts to provide an alternative approach to the philosophy of religion through a new interpretation of Daoist philosophy in light of Husserls phenomenology. I (...)argue that Lao-Zhuangs wu-wei should be understood as a reduction of our existential and conceptual beliefs about the reality of this world. In Lao-Zhuang, wu-wei is related to the theme of decentering of the subject. In order to be a true self, we have to make space at the core of our being for Dao to appear. The authentic selfhood is constituted in its correctrelation to Dao. In Daoist philosophy of religion, the center of gravity in the relation between Dao and the world (or worlds) is shifted from this world to Dao, and the problematic in the philosophy of religion is displaced from a truth-oriented issue to a receptivity issue. (shrink)
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  50. Michael Nylan (1997). Han Classicists Writing in Dialogue About Their Own Tradition. Philosophy East and West 47 (2):133-188.score: 18.0
    Despite the scathing criticisms leveled at Han philosophy by orthodox Neo-Confucians and their latter-day scholastic followers, the most accurate characterization of many extant pieces of Han (...) philosophical writing would be "critical" (rather than "superstitious") and "probing" (rather than "derivative"). In defense of this statement, three major Han philosophical works are examined, with particular emphasis on the treatment in these works of classical tradition and classical learning. The three works are the "Fa yen" (ca. A.D. 9) by Yang Hsiung, the "Lun heng" (ca. A.D. 80) by Wang Ch'ung, and the "Feng su t'ung yi" (ca. A.D. 200) by Ying Shao. All three works are profoundly critical of beliefs and practices endemic to mainstream state-sponsored Confucianism in the Han. Good reasons lead Yang Hsiung, Wang Ch'ung, and Ying Shao to employ the dialogue, rather than the expository essay. Also, the particular styles of dialogue chosen by Yang, Wang, and Ying directly relate to the specific content of their varying critiques of contemporary forms of Confucian theorizing and practice. (shrink)
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