Search results for 'Welfare economics' (try it on Scholar)

  1. Collective Choice & Social Welfare (2009). A Complete List of Sen's Writings is Available a T Http://Www. Economics. Harvard. In Christopher W. Morris (ed.), Amartya Sen. Cambridge University Press
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  2.  62
    D. Wade Hands (2013). Mark Blaug on the Normativity of Welfare Economics. Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 6:1-25.
    Abstract: This paper examines Mark Blaug's position on the normative character of Paretian welfare economics: in general, and specifically with respect to his debate with Pieter Hennipman over this question during the 1990s. The paper also clarifies some of the confusions that emerged within the context of this debate, and closes by providing some additional arguments supporting Blaug's position that he himself did not provide.
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  3.  69
    Yew-Kwang Ng (1995). Towards Welfare Biology: Evolutionary Economics of Animal Consciousness and Suffering. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 10 (3):255-285.
    Welfare biology is the study of living things and their environment with respect to their welfare. Despite difficulties of ascertaining and measuring welfare and relevancy to normative issues, welfare biology is a positive science. Evolutionary economics and population dynamics are used to help answer basic questions in welfare biology : Which species are affective sentients capable of welfare? Do they enjoy positive or negative welfare? Can their welfare be dramatically increased? Under (...)
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  4. Daniel M. Hausman & Michael S. McPherson (2009). Preference Satisfaction and Welfare Economics. Economics and Philosophy 25 (1):1-25.
    The tenuous claims of cost-benefit analysis to guide policy so as to promote welfare turn on measuring welfare by preference satisfaction and taking willingness-to-pay to indicate preferences. Yet it is obvious that people's preferences are not always self-interested and that false beliefs may lead people to prefer what is worse for them even when people are self-interested. So welfare is not preference satisfaction, and hence it appears that cost-benefit analysis and welfare economics in general rely (...)
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  5.  86
    Daniel M. Hausman (2010). Hedonism and Welfare Economics. Economics and Philosophy 26 (3):321-344.
    This essay criticizes the proposal recently defended by a number of prominent economists that welfare economics be redirected away from the satisfaction of people's preferences and toward making people happy instead. Although information about happiness may sometimes be of use, the notion of happiness is sufficiently ambiguous and the objections to identifying welfare with happiness are sufficiently serious that welfare economists are better off using preference satisfaction as a measure of welfare. The essay also examines (...)
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  6.  3
    John Broome (1985). The Welfare Economics of Population. Social Choice and Welfare 2:221-34.
    Intuition suggests there is no value in adding people to the population if it brings no benefits to people already living: creating people is morally neutral in itself. This paper examines the difficulties of incorporating this intuition into a coherent theory of the value of population. It takes three existing theories within welfare economics - average utilitarianism, relativist utilitarianism, and critical-level utilitarianism - and considers whether they can satisfactorily accommodate the intuition that creating people is neutral.
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  7.  10
    Robert Sugden (2013). The Behavioural Economist and the Social Planner: To Whom Should Behavioural Welfare Economics Be Addressed? Inquiry 56 (5):519 - 538.
    ABSTRACT This paper compares two alternative answers to the question ?Who is the addressee of welfare economics?? These answers correspond with different understandings of the status of the normative conclusions of welfare economics and have different implications for how welfare economics should be adapted in the light of the findings of behavioural economics. The conventional welfarist answer is that welfare economics is addressed to a ?social planner?, whose objective is to maximize (...)
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  8.  8
    Paola Manzini & Marco Mariotti (2014). Welfare Economics and Bounded Rationality: The Case for Model-Based Approaches. Journal of Economic Methodology 21 (4):343-360.
    In this paper, we examine the problems facing a policy maker who observes inconsistent choices made by agents who are boundedly rational. We contrast a model-less and a model-based approach to welfare economics. We make the case for the model-based approach and examine its advantages as well as some problematic issues associated with it.
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  9.  25
    Karen Knight, Welfare Economics and the Welfare State in Historical Perspective.
    Although the economic thought of Marshall and Pigou was united by ethical positions broadly considered utilitarian, differences in their intellectual milieu led to degrees of difference between their respective philosophical visions. This change in milieu includes the influence of the little understood period of transition from the early idealist period in Great Britain, which provided the context to Marshall’s intellectual formation, and the late British Idealist period, which provided the context to Pigou’s intellectual formation. During this latter period, the pervading (...)
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  10.  4
    Gerardo Infante, Guilhem Lecouteux & Robert Sugden (2016). Preference Purification and the Inner Rational Agent: A Critique of the Conventional Wisdom of Behavioural Welfare Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 23 (1):1-25.
    Neoclassical economics assumes that individuals have stable and context-independent preferences, and uses preference satisfaction as a normative criterion. By calling this assumption into question, behavioural findings cause fundamental problems for normative economics. A common response to these problems is to treat deviations from conventional rational choice theory as mistakes, and to try to reconstruct the preferences that individuals would have acted on, had they reasoned correctly. We argue that this preference purification approach implicitly uses a dualistic model of (...)
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  11.  2
    Alexander F. Sarch (2015). Hausman and McPherson on Welfare Economics and Preference Satisfaction Theories of Welfare: A Critical Note. Economics and Philosophy 31 (1):141-159.
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  12.  10
    David L. Prychitko (1993). Formalism in Austrian‐School Welfare Economics: Another Pretense of Knowledge? Critical Review 7 (4):567-592.
    Contemporary Austrian?school economists reject neoclassical welfare theory for being founded on the benchmark of a perfectly competitive general equilibrium, and instead favor a formal theory deemed consistent with the notions of radical subjectivism and disequilibrium analysis. Roy Cordato advances a bold free?market benchmark by which to formally assess social welfare, economic efficiency, and externalities issues. Like all formalist, a priori theory, however, Cordato's reformulation cannot meet its own standards, being theoretically and empirically flawed, and perhaps ideologically suspect.
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  13.  21
    Ashley Piggins (2007). Population Issues in Social Choice Theory, Welfare Economics, and Ethics, by Charles Blackorby, Walter Bossert, and David Donaldson. Cambridge University Press, 2005, VIII+369 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 23 (2):256-260.
  14. A. B. Atkinson (2008). Welfare Economics and Giving for Development. In Kaushik Basu & Ravi Kanbur (eds.), Arguments for a Better World: Essays in Honor of Amartya Sen: Volume I: Ethics, Welfare, and Measurement and Volume Ii: Society, Institutions, and Development. OUP Oxford
  15. Prasanta K. Pattanaik & Yongsheng Xu (2009). Conceptions of Individual Rights and Freedom in Welfare Economics : A Re-Examination. In Reiko Gotoh & Paul Dumouchel (eds.), Against Injustice: The New Economics of Amartya Sen. Cambridge University Press
     
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  16.  3
    Giuseppe Munda (forthcoming). Beyond Welfare Economics: Some Methodological Issues. Journal of Economic Methodology:1-18.
    When one wishes to formulate, evaluate and implement public policies, the existence of a plurality of social actors, with interest in the policy being assessed, generates a conflictual situation. How such a conflict should be dealt with? This paper defends the thesis articulated in the following points: Different metrics are linked to different objectives and values. To use only one measurement unit for incorporating a plurality of dimensions, objectives and values, implies reductionism necessarily. Point can be proven as a matter (...)
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  17.  8
    Amartya K. Sen (1979). Personal Utilities and Public Judgements: Or What's Wrong With Welfare Economics. Economic Journal 89 (355):537-558.
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  18. Hal R. Varian (1975). Distributive Justice, Welfare Economics, and the Theory of Fairness. Philosophy and Public Affairs 4 (3):223-247.
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  19.  16
    John Kay (2012). "Economics as Applied Ethics: Value Judgements in Welfare Economics," by Wilfred Beckerman. Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (4):778-781.
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  20.  4
    Daniel M. Hausman (1993). Liberalism, Welfare Economics, and Freedom. Social Philosophy and Policy 10 (2):172-197.
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  21.  8
    Tuovi Allén (1988). The Impossibility of the Paretian Liberal and its Relevance to Welfare Economics. Theory and Decision 24 (1):57-76.
  22.  4
    George P. Klubertanz (1971). "Scholasticism and Welfare Economics," by Stephen Theodore Worland. Modern Schoolman 48 (2):208-208.
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  23.  29
    Lansana Keita (1999). Welfare Economics and Positive Neoclassical Economics. Journal of Value Inquiry 33 (3):335-351.
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  24.  7
    Peter Brand (1980). Manipulation-Proofness: A Concept for Widening the Scope of Arrowian Welfare Economics, Both Practically and Intellectually. Theory and Decision 12 (4):325-358.
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  25.  2
    Eric Schliesser (2015). On Joseph Cropsey’s “What Is Welfare Economics?”. Ethics 125 (3):847-850,.
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  26.  14
    Frank H. Knight (1951). Economics and Welfare:Theories of Welfare Economics. Hla Myint. Ethics 61 (3):219-.
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  27.  16
    Kotaro Suzumura, An Interview with Paul Samuelson: Welfare Economics, €Œold†and €Œnewâ€, and Social Choice Theory.
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  28.  3
    B. Jackson (2004). The Uses of Utilitarianism: Social Justice, Welfare Economics and British Socialism, 1931-48. History of Political Thought 25 (3):508-535.
  29.  10
    Gordon Welty (1967). Quality Control, Welfare Economics, and Professor Baier. Journal of Value Inquiry 1 (2):139-148.
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  30.  4
    Joseph A. Giacalone (1970). Scholasticism and Welfare Economics. New Scholasticism 44 (2):312-314.
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  31.  13
    Joseph Cropsey (1955). What is Welfare Economics? Ethics 65 (2):116-125.
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  32. Daniel M. Hausman (1993). Liberalism, Welfare Economics, and Freedom*: DANIEL M. HAUSMAN. Social Philosophy and Policy 10 (2):172-197.
    With the collapse of the centrally controlled economies and the authoritarian governments of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet republics, political leaders are, with appreciable public support, espousing “liberal” economic and political transformations—the reinstitution of markets, the securing of civil and political rights, and the establishment of representative governments. But those supporting reform have many aims, and the liberalism to which they look for political guidance is not an unambiguous doctrine.
     
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  33.  3
    Charles Blackorby & David Donaldson (1991). Adult-Equivalence Scales, Interpersonal Comparisons of Well-Being, and Applied Welfare Economics. In Jon Elster & John E. Roemer (eds.), Interpersonal Comparisons of Well-Being. Cambridge University Press 164.
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  34.  10
    Benjamin Ward (1956). What is Welfare Economics? Ethics 66 (3):209-213.
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  35.  2
    H. G. Lewis (1951). Book Review:Social Economy and the Price System: An Essay in Welfare Economics. Raymond T. Bye. [REVIEW] Ethics 61 (4):325-.
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  36. Raymond T. Bye (1950). Social Economy and the Price System: An Essay in Welfare Economics. By H. G. Lewis. [REVIEW] Ethics 61:325.
     
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  37. Russell Hardin (1982). Sugden, Robert, "The Political Economy of Public Choice: An Introduction to Welfare Economics". [REVIEW] Ethics 93:632.
     
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  38. Gary Miller (1992). Welfare Economics and the Individual. In Norman E. Bowie & R. Edward Freeman (eds.), Ethics and Agency Theory: An Introduction. Oxford University Press 117.
     
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  39. A. F. Peters (1951). LITTLE, I. M. D. -A Critique of Welfare Economics. [REVIEW] Mind 60:558.
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  40.  36
    Paul B. Thompson (2013). F. Bailey Norwood and Jayson L. Lusk: Compassion by the Pound: The Economics of Farm Animal Welfare. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (2):517-521.
    F. Bailey Norwood and Jayson L. Lusk: Compassion by the Pound: The Economics of Farm Animal Welfare Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-5 DOI 10.1007/s10806-012-9377-z Authors Paul B. Thompson, WK Kellogg Professor of Agricultural, Food and Community Ethics, Department of Philosophy, Michigan State University, 503 South Kedzie Hall, East Lansing, MI 48824-1032, USA Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863.
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  41. James Rolph Edwards (2003). Economics, Politics, and the Coming Collapse of the Elderly Welfare State. Journal of Libertarian Studies 17 (1; SEAS WIN):1-16.
     
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  42. F. Bailey Norwood & Jayson L. Lusk (2011). Compassion, by the Pound: The Economics of Farm Animal Welfare. OUP Oxford.
    This highly readable book is aimed at anyone with an interest in the food they eat. In conversational tone, and avoiding academic jargon, it provides an honest and objective account of the consequences of food consumption choices and policies, through the lens of economics.
     
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  43. Philippe Mongin (2006). A Concept of Progress for Normative Economics. Economics and Philosophy 22 (1):19-54.
    The paper discusses the sense in which the changes undergone by normative economics in the twentieth century can be said to be progressive. A simple criterion is proposed to decide whether a sequence of normative theories is progressive. This criterion is put to use on the historical transition from the new welfare economics to social choice theory. The paper reconstructs this classic case, and eventually concludes that the latter theory was progressive compared with the former. It also (...)
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  44.  14
    James M. Buchanan (1988). The Economics of Rights, Co-Operation, and Welfare, Robert Sugden. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1986, Vii + 191 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 4 (2):341.
  45.  10
    Joshua M. Frank (2002). The Actual and Potential Contribution of Economics to Animal Welfare Issues. Society and Animals 10 (4):421-428.
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  46.  4
    W. D. Lamont, Honor Brotman & J. P. Corbett (1953). Symposium: The Concept of Welfare in Economics. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 27:159 - 230.
  47.  5
    Carl-Henric Grenholm (2004). Economics, Justice, and Welfare: An Introduction. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (4):339 - 345.
  48.  2
    Frank H. Knight (1951). Review: Economics and Welfare. [REVIEW] Ethics 61 (3):219 - 224.
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  49. Carl-Henric Grenholm (2004). Economics, Justice, and Welfare: An Introduction. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (4):339-345.
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  50. Frank H. Knight (1950). Economics and Welfare. Ethics 61:219.
     
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