Search results for 'Welfare economics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Yew-Kwang Ng (1995). Towards Welfare Biology: Evolutionary Economics of Animal Consciousness and Suffering. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 10 (3):255-285.score: 72.0
    Welfare biology is the study of living things and their environment with respect to their welfare (defined as net happiness, or enjoyment minus suffering). Despite difficulties of ascertaining and measuring welfare and relevancy to normative issues, welfare biology is a positive science. Evolutionary economics and population dynamics are used to help answer basic questions in welfare biology: Which species are affective sentients capable of welfare? Do they enjoy positive or negative welfare? Can (...)
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  2. Daniel M. Hausman & Michael S. McPherson (2009). Preference Satisfaction and Welfare Economics. Economics and Philosophy 25 (1):1-25.score: 63.0
    The tenuous claims of cost-benefit analysis to guide policy so as to promote welfare turn on measuring welfare by preference satisfaction and taking willingness-to-pay to indicate preferences. Yet it is obvious that people's preferences are not always self-interested and that false beliefs may lead people to prefer what is worse for them even when people are self-interested. So welfare is not preference satisfaction, and hence it appears that cost-benefit analysis and welfare economics in general rely (...)
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  3. Daniel M. Hausman (2010). Hedonism and Welfare Economics. Economics and Philosophy 26 (03):321-344.score: 63.0
    This essay criticizes the proposal recently defended by a number of prominent economists that welfare economics be redirected away from the satisfaction of people's preferences and toward making people happy instead. Although information about happiness may sometimes be of use, the notion of happiness is sufficiently ambiguous and the objections to identifying welfare with happiness are sufficiently serious that welfare economists are better off using preference satisfaction as a measure of welfare. The essay also examines (...)
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  4. Robert Sugden (2013). The Behavioural Economist and the Social Planner: To Whom Should Behavioural Welfare Economics Be Addressed? Inquiry 56 (5):519 - 538.score: 60.0
    ABSTRACT This paper compares two alternative answers to the question ?Who is the addressee of welfare economics?? These answers correspond with different understandings of the status of the normative conclusions of welfare economics and have different implications for how welfare economics should be adapted in the light of the findings of behavioural economics. The conventional welfarist answer is that welfare economics is addressed to a ?social planner?, whose objective is to maximize (...)
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  5. Philippe Mongin (2006). A Concept of Progress for Normative Economics. Economics and Philosophy 22 (1):19-54.score: 57.0
    The paper discusses the sense in which the changes undergone by normative economics in the twentieth century can be said to be progressive. A simple criterion is proposed to decide whether a sequence of normative theories is progressive. This criterion is put to use on the historical transition from the new welfare economics to social choice theory. The paper reconstructs this classic case, and eventually concludes that the latter theory was progressive compared with the former. It also (...)
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  6. David L. Prychitko (1993). Formalism in Austrian‐School Welfare Economics: Another Pretense of Knowledge? Critical Review 7 (4):567-592.score: 52.0
    Contemporary Austrian?school economists reject neoclassical welfare theory for being founded on the benchmark of a perfectly competitive general equilibrium, and instead favor a formal theory deemed consistent with the notions of radical subjectivism and disequilibrium analysis. Roy Cordato advances a bold free?market benchmark by which to formally assess social welfare, economic efficiency, and externalities issues. Like all formalist, a priori theory, however, Cordato's reformulation cannot meet its own standards, being theoretically and empirically flawed, and perhaps ideologically suspect.
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  7. Paul B. Thompson (2013). F. Bailey Norwood and Jayson L. Lusk: Compassion by the Pound: The Economics of Farm Animal Welfare. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (2):517-521.score: 48.0
    F. Bailey Norwood and Jayson L. Lusk: Compassion by the Pound: The Economics of Farm Animal Welfare Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-5 DOI 10.1007/s10806-012-9377-z Authors Paul B. Thompson, WK Kellogg Professor of Agricultural, Food and Community Ethics, Department of Philosophy, Michigan State University, 503 South Kedzie Hall, East Lansing, MI 48824-1032, USA Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863.
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  8. Ashley Piggins (2007). Population Issues in Social Choice Theory, Welfare Economics, and Ethics, by Charles Blackorby, Walter Bossert, and David Donaldson. Cambridge University Press, 2005, VIII+369 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 23 (2):256-260.score: 48.0
  9. Jean-Paul Moatti (1999). Ethical Issues in the Economic Assessment of Health Care Technologies. Health Care Analysis 7 (2):153-165.score: 48.0
    This paper challenges traditional views which oppose health economics and medical ethics by arguing that economic assessment is a necessary complement to medical ethics and can help to improve public participation and democratic processes in choices about resource allocation for health care technologies. In support of this argument, four points are emphasized: (1) Most current biomedical ethical debates implicitly deal with economic issues of resource allocation. (2) Clinical decisions, which usually respect the Hippocratic code of ethics, are nevertheless influenced (...)
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  10. A. B. Atkinson (2008). Welfare Economics and Giving for Development. In Kaushik Basu & Ravi Kanbur (eds.), Arguments for a Better World: Essays in Honor of Amartya Sen: Volume I: Ethics, Welfare, and Measurement and Volume Ii: Society, Institutions, and Development. Oup Oxford.score: 48.0
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  11. F. Bailey Norwood & Jayson L. Lusk (2011). Compassion, by the Pound: The Economics of Farm Animal Welfare. OUP Oxford.score: 48.0
    For much of human history, most of the population lived and worked on farms but today, information about livestock is more likely to come from children's books than hands-on experience. When romanticized notions of an agrarian lifestyle meet with the realities of the modern industrial farm, the result is often a plea for a return to antiquated production methods. The result is a brewing controversy between animal activist groups, farmers, and consumers that is currently being played out in ballot boxes, (...)
     
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  12. Prasanta K. Pattanaik & Yongsheng Xu (2009). Conceptions of Individual Rights and Freedom in Welfare Economics : A Re-Examination. In Reiko Gotoh & Paul Dumouchel (eds.), Against Injustice: The New Economics of Amartya Sen. Cambridge University Press.score: 48.0
     
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  13. Amartya K. Sen (1979). Personal Utilities and Public Judgements: Or What's Wrong With Welfare Economics. Economic Journal 89 (355):537-558.score: 46.0
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  14. Dag G. Aasland (2004). On the Ethics Behind “Business Ethics”. Journal of Business Ethics 53 (1-2):3-8.score: 45.0
    Ethics in business and economics is often attacked for being too superficial. By elaborating the conclusions of two such critics of business ethics and welfare economics respectively, this article will draw the attention to the ethics behind these apparently well-intended, but not always convincing constructions, by help of the fundamental ethics of Emmanuel Levinas. To Levinas, responsibility is more basic than language, and thus also more basic than all social constructions. Co-operation relations in organizations, markets and value (...)
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  15. Hal R. Varian (1975). Distributive Justice, Welfare Economics, and the Theory of Fairness. Philosophy and Public Affairs 4 (3):223-247.score: 45.0
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  16. Lansana Keita (1999). Welfare Economics and Positive Neoclassical Economics. Journal of Value Inquiry 33 (3):335-351.score: 45.0
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  17. Kotaro Suzumura, An Interview with Paul Samuelson: Welfare Economics, €Œold†and €Œnewâ€, and Social Choice Theory.score: 45.0
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  18. Frank H. Knight (1951). Economics and Welfare:Theories of Welfare Economics. Hla Myint. Ethics 61 (3):219-.score: 45.0
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  19. Joseph Cropsey (1955). What is Welfare Economics? Ethics 65 (2):116-125.score: 45.0
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  20. Benjamin Ward (1956). What is Welfare Economics? Ethics 66 (3):209-213.score: 45.0
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  21. John Kay (2012). "Economics as Applied Ethics: Value Judgements in Welfare Economics," by Wilfred Beckerman. Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (4):778-781.score: 45.0
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  22. Gordon Welty (1967). Quality Control, Welfare Economics, and Professor Baier. Journal of Value Inquiry 1 (2):139-148.score: 45.0
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  23. H. G. Lewis (1951). Book Review:Social Economy and the Price System: An Essay in Welfare Economics. Raymond T. Bye. [REVIEW] Ethics 61 (4):325-.score: 45.0
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  24. Tuovi Allén (1988). The Impossibility of the Paretian Liberal and its Relevance to Welfare Economics. Theory and Decision 24 (1):57-76.score: 45.0
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  25. Peter Brand (1980). Manipulation-Proofness: A Concept for Widening the Scope of Arrowian Welfare Economics, Both Practically and Intellectually. Theory and Decision 12 (4):325-358.score: 45.0
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  26. Joseph A. Giacalone (1970). Scholasticism and Welfare Economics. New Scholasticism 44 (2):312-314.score: 45.0
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  27. Daniel M. Hausman (1993). Liberalism, Welfare Economics, and Freedom. Social Philosophy and Policy 10 (2):172-197.score: 45.0
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  28. Charles Blackorby & David Donaldson (1991). Adult-Equivalence Scales, Interpersonal Comparisons of Well-Being, and Applied Welfare Economics. In Jon Elster & John E. Roemer (eds.), Interpersonal Comparisons of Well-Being. Cambridge University Press. 164.score: 45.0
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  29. B. Jackson (2004). The Uses of Utilitarianism: Social Justice, Welfare Economics and British Socialism, 1931-48. History of Political Thought 25 (3):508-535.score: 45.0
  30. George P. Klubertanz (1971). "Scholasticism and Welfare Economics," by Stephen Theodore Worland. The Modern Schoolman 48 (2):208-208.score: 45.0
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  31. Gary Miller (1992). Welfare Economics and the Individual. In Norman E. Bowie & R. Edward Freeman (eds.), Ethics and Agency Theory: An Introduction. Oxford University Press. 117.score: 45.0
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  32. Jelle de Boer (2014). Preference, Value, Choice, and Welfare. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 30:99-103.score: 42.0
  33. James M. Buchanan (1988). The Economics of Rights, Co-Operation, and Welfare, Robert Sugden. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1986, Vii + 191 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 4 (02):341-.score: 39.0
  34. Larry Winter Roeder (2011). Diplomacy, Funding and Animal Welfare. Springer.score: 39.0
    Diplomatic theory and practice -- International funding for animal protection -- International conferences and delegation management -- The media as a tool for diplomacy -- Important associations and international organizations -- Epilogue.
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  35. Scott Gordon (1980). Welfare, Justice, and Freedom. Columbia University Press.score: 39.0
  36. Adam Gearey (2012). Justice as Welfare: Equity and Solidarity. Continuum.score: 39.0
  37. Alan P. Hamlin (1986). Ethics, Economics, and the State. St. Martin's Press.score: 39.0
  38. Peter Joseph Hammer (ed.) (2003). Uncertain Times: Kenneth Arrow and the Changing Economics of Health Care. Duke University Press.score: 39.0
     
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  39. Wilhelm Röpke (1964). Welfare, Freedom, and Inflation. University, Ala.,University of Alabama Press.score: 39.0
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  40. Kevin Vallier (forthcoming). A Moral and Economic Critique of the New Property-Owning Democrats: On Behalf of a Rawlsian Welfare State. Philosophical Studies:1-22.score: 36.0
    Property-owning democracies combine the regulative and redistributive functions of the welfare state with the governmental aim of ensuring that wealth and capital are widely dispersed. John Rawls, political philosophy’s most famous property-owning democrat, argued that property-owning democracy was one of two regime types that best realized his two principles of justice, though he was notoriously vague about how a property-owning democracy’s institutions are meant to realize his principles. To compensate for this deficiency, a number of Rawlsian political philosophers have (...)
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  41. H. L. I. Bornett, J. H. Guy & P. J. Cain (2003). Impact of Animal Welfare on Costs and Viability of Pig Production in the UK. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (2):163-186.score: 36.0
    The European Union welfare standardsfor intensively kept pigs have steadilyincreased over the past few years and areproposed to continue in the future. It isimportant that the cost implications of thesechanges in welfare standards are assessed. Theaim of this study was to determine theprofitability of rearing pigs in a range ofhousing systems with different standards forpig welfare. Models were constructed tocalculate the cost of pig rearing (6–95 kg) in afully-slatted system (fulfilling minimum EUspace requirements, Directive 91630/EEC); apartly-slatted system; (...)
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  42. Carl-Henric Grenholm (2004). Economics, Justice, and Welfare: An Introduction. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (4):339 - 345.score: 36.0
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  43. Richard Cookson (1996). Welfare Economic Dogmas: A Reply to Sagoff. Environmental Values 5 (1):59 - 74.score: 36.0
    This article examines Sagoff's criticisms of 'Four Dogmas of Environmental Economies' (Environmental Values, Winter 1994) and argues that none of them are fatal. Many of the criticisms appear to rest on general misunderstandings about welfare economics. One misunderstanding is that transaction costs are theoretically indistinguishable from regular production costs. The theoretical distinction is that transaction costs vary under alternative policies and institutions whereas production costs are fixed by tastes, technology and endowments. Another misunderstanding is that market failure concerns (...)
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  44. W. D. Lamont, Honor Brotman & J. P. Corbett (1953). Symposium: The Concept of Welfare in Economics. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 27:159 - 230.score: 36.0
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  45. Joshua M. Frank (2002). The Actual and Potential Contribution of Economics to Animal Welfare Issues. Society and Animals 10 (4):421-428.score: 36.0
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  46. Frank H. Knight (1951). Review: Economics and Welfare. [REVIEW] Ethics 61 (3):219 - 224.score: 36.0
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  47. James Rolph Edwards (2003). Economics, Politics, and the Coming Collapse of the Elderly Welfare State. Journal of Libertarian Studies 17 (1; SEAS WIN):1-16.score: 36.0
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  48. É Gocsik, H. W. Saatkamp, C. C. De Lauwere & A. G. J. M. Oude Lansink (2014). A Conceptual Approach for a Quantitative Economic Analysis of Farmers' Decision-Making Regarding Animal Welfare. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (2):287-308.score: 35.0
    Decisions related to animal welfare (AW) standards depend on farmer’s multiple goals and values and are constrained by a wide range of external and internal forces. The aim of this paper is twofold, i.e., (1) to develop a theoretical framework for farmers’ AW decisions that incorporates farmers’ goals, use and non-use values and (2) to present an approach to empirically implement the theoretical framework. The farmer as a head of the farm household makes choices regarding production to maximize the (...)
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  49. Francis Weyzig (2009). Political and Economic Arguments for Corporate Social Responsibility: Analysis and a Proposition Regarding the Csr Agenda. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 86 (4):417 - 428.score: 33.0
    Different perspectives on corporate social responsibility (CSR) exist, each with their own agenda. Some emphasise management responsibilities towards stakeholders, others argue that companies should actively contribute to social goals, and yet others reject a social responsibility of business beyond legal compliance. In addition, CSR initiatives relate to different issues, such as labour standards and corruption. This article analyses what types of CSR initiatives are supported by political and economic arguments. The distinction between different CSR perspectives and CSR issues on the (...)
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  50. R. Duncan Luce (2010). Interpersonal Comparisons of Utility for 2 of 3 Types of People. Theory and Decision 68 (1-2):5-24.score: 33.0
    This article argues that there is a natural solution to carry out interpersonal comparisons of utility when the theory of gambles is supplemented with a group operation of joint receipts. If so, three types of people can exist, and the two types having multiplicative representations of joint receipt have, in contrast to most utility theories, absolute scales of utility. This makes possible, at least in principle, meaningful interpersonal comparisons of utility with desirable properties, thus resolving a long standing philosophical problem (...)
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