Search results for 'Wen-jiuan Yendoctoral Student' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Beth L. Rodgers Phd Rn Faanprofessor & Wen-jiuan Yendoctoral Student (2002). Re-Thinking Nursing Science Through the Understanding of Buddhism. Nursing Philosophy 3 (3):213–221.score: 2010.0
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  2. Xing Wen (2013). Did King Wen of Zhou Develop the Zhouyi? Contemporary Chinese Thought 44 (3):60-85.score: 180.0
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  3. Beth L. Rodgers & Wen-Jiuan Yen (2002). Re-Thinking Nursing Science Through the Understanding of Buddhism. Nursing Philosophy 3 (3):213-221.score: 27.0
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  4. Robert M. Siegfried (2004). Student Attitudes on Software Piracy and Related Issues of Computer Ethics. Ethics and Information Technology 6 (4):215-222.score: 24.0
    Software piracy is older than the PC and has been the subject of several studies, which have found it to be a widespread phenomenon in general, and among university students in particular. An earlier study by Cohen and Cornwell from a decade ago is replicated, adding questions about downloading music from the Internet. The survey includes responses from 224 students in entry-level courses at two schools, a nondenominational suburban university and a Catholic urban college with similar student profiles. The (...)
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  5. Sarah B. Laditka & Margaret M. Houck (2006). Student-Developed Case Studies: An Experiential Approach for Teaching Ethics in Management. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 64 (2):157 - 167.score: 24.0
    To prepare for ethically challenging situations in the workplace, it is useful for students to explore their attitudes toward ethical issues and their own value systems. An experiential assignment to teach ethics in business programs is presented. This method allows instructors to incorporate a “stand alone” assignment in ethics into a course that focuses on another area in management. The assignment, student-developed case studies of ethical situations in the workplace, requires students to develop individual case studies in ethics drawing (...)
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  6. Arthur Coren (2011). Turning a Blind Eye: Faculty Who Ignore Student Cheating. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 9 (4):291-305.score: 24.0
    In this study, 40.3% of faculty members admitted to ignoring student cheating on one or more occasions. The quality of past experience in dealing with academic integrity violations was examined. Faculty members with previous bad experiences were more likely to prefer dealing with cheating by ignoring it. The data were further analysed to determine beliefs and attitudes that distinguish between faculty who have never ignored an instance of cheating and those who indicated that they have ignored one or more (...)
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  7. E. Alpay (2013). Student-Inspired Activities for the Teaching and Learning of Engineering Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (4):1455-1468.score: 24.0
    Ethics teaching in engineering can be problematic because of student perceptions of its subjective, ambiguous and philosophical content. The use of discipline-specific case studies has helped to address such perceptions, as has practical decision making and problem solving approaches based on some ethical frameworks. However, a need exists for a wider range of creative methods in ethics education to help complement the variety of activities and learning experiences within the engineering curriculum. In this work, a novel approach is presented (...)
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  8. Nalinaksha Bhattacharyya (2004). Student Evaluations and Moral Hazard. Journal of Academic Ethics 2 (3):263-271.score: 24.0
    Most universities solicit feedback from students at the end of a course in order to assess student perceptions of the course. This feedback is used for various objectives, including for evaluating teaching by academic administrators. One would therefore expect faculty to rationally take this into account while formulating their teaching strategy. In certain cases, such strategic considerations can give rise to moral hazard. I have modelled the situation using the well-known Prisoners Dilemma game and found that in equilibrium, the (...)
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  9. Corrine R. Sackett (2010). Authorship in Student-Faculty Collaborative Research: Perceptions of Current and Best Practices. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (3):199-215.score: 24.0
    Determining appropriate authorship recognition in student-faculty collaborative research is a complex task. In this quantitative study, responses from 1346 students and faculty in education and some social science disciplines at 36 research-intensive institutions in the United States were analyzed to provide a description of current and recommended practices for authorship in student-faculty collaborative research. The responses revealed practices and perceptions that are not aligned with ethical guidelines and a lack of consensus among respondents about appropriate practice. Faculty and (...)
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  10. Dennis F. Thompson (1976). Bibliography: The Education of a Founding Father. The Reading List for John Witherspoon's Course in Political Theory, as Taken by James Madison. Political Theory 4 (4):523-529.score: 24.0
    ...Witherspoon's Course in Political Theory, as Taken by James Madison Dennis F. Thompson Princeton University [523...Witherspoon's Course in Political Theory, as Taken by James Madison. James Madison was an unusually wen-prepared student when, at eighteen...
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  11. Laura Welfare & Corrine Sackett (2010). Authorship in Student-Faculty Collaborative Research: Perceptions of Current and Best Practices. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (3):199-215.score: 24.0
    Determining appropriate authorship recognition in student-faculty collaborative research is a complex task. In this quantitative study, responses from 1346 students and faculty in education and some social science disciplines at 36 research-intensive institutions in the United States were analyzed to provide a description of current and recommended practices for authorship in student-faculty collaborative research. The responses revealed practices and perceptions that are not aligned with ethical guidelines and a lack of consensus among respondents about appropriate practice. Faculty and (...)
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  12. Cynthia D. Rittenhouse (1996). Survival Skills and Ethics Training for Graduate Students: A Graduate Student Perspective. Science and Engineering Ethics 2 (3):367-380.score: 24.0
    Graduate students in the sciences must develop practical skills geared toward scientific survival and success. This is particularly true now, given the paucity of research funds and jobs. Along with more elementary skills, research ethics should be an integral part of students’ scientific training. Survival skills include research skills, communication skills, general efficiency, and preparation for post-graduate work. Ethics training covers guidelines for use of animal and human subjects, data treatment, disclosure, credit issues, conflicts of interest, and response to misconduct. (...)
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  13. Erika Löfström & Pauliina Kupila (2013). The Instructional Challenges of Student Plagiarism. Journal of Academic Ethics 11 (3):231-242.score: 24.0
    The focus of this article is university teachers’ and students’ views of plagiarism, plagiarism detection, and the use of plagiarism detection software as learning support. The data were collected from teachers and students who participated in a pilot project to test plagiarism detection software at a major university in Finland. The data were analysed through factor analysis, T-tests and inductive content analysis. Three distinct reasons for plagiarism were identified: intentional, unintentional and contextual. The teachers did not utilise plagiarism detection to (...)
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  14. Mary E. Sunderland (2013). Using Student Engagement to Relocate Ethics to the Core of the Engineering Curriculum. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-18.score: 24.0
    One of the core problems with engineering ethics education is perceptual. Although ethics is meant to be a central component of today’s engineering curriculum, it is often perceived as a marginal requirement that must be fulfilled. In addition, there is a mismatch between faculty and student perceptions of ethics. While faculty aim to communicate the nuances and complexity of engineering ethics, students perceive ethics as laws, rules, and codes that must be memorized. This paper provides some historical context to (...)
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  15. Michael H. Malloy (2012). The Osler Student Societies of the University of Texas Medical Branch: A Medical Professionalism Translational Tool. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 24 (4):273-278.score: 24.0
    This essay reviews some of the issues associated with the challenge of integrating the concepts of medical professionalism into the socialization and identity formation of the undergraduate medical student. A narrative-based approach to the integration of professionalism in medical education proposed by Coulehan (Acad Med 80(10):892–898, 2005) offers an appealing method to accomplish the task in a less didactic format and in a way that promotes more personal growth. In this essay, I review how the Osler Student Societies (...)
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  16. Bradley J. Sleeper, Kenneth C. Schneider, Paula S. Weber & James E. Weber (2006). Scale and Study of Student Attitudes Toward Business Education's Role in Addressing Social Issues. Journal of Business Ethics 68 (4):381 - 391.score: 24.0
    Corporations and investors are responding to recent major ethical scandals with increased attention to the social impacts of business operations. In turn, business colleges and their international accrediting body are increasing their efforts to make students more aware of the social context of corporate activity. Business education literature lacks data on student attitudes toward such education. This study found that post-scandal business students, particularly women, are indeed interested in it. Their interest is positively related to their past donation, volunteerism, (...)
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  17. Lisa M. Robins & Peter J. Kanowski (2008). PhD by Publication: A Student's Perspective. Journal of Research Practice 4 (2):Article M3.score: 24.0
    This article presents the first author's experiences as an Australian doctoral student undertaking a PhD by publication in the arena of the social sciences. She published nine articles in refereed journals and a peer-reviewed book chapter during the course of her PhD. We situate this experience in the context of current discussion about doctoral publication practices, in order to inform both postgraduate students and academics in general. The article discusses recent thinking about PhD by publication and identifies the factors (...)
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  18. M. L. Jennings (2009). Medical Student Burnout: Interdisciplinary Exploration and Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 30 (4):253-269.score: 24.0
    Burnout—a stress-related syndrome characterized by exhaustion, depersonalization, and a diminished sense of accomplishment—is a common phenomenon among medical students with significant potential consequences for student health, professionalism, and patient care. This essay proposes that the epidemic of medical student burnout can be attributed to a technocratic paradigm that fails to value medical students as persons with human needs and limitations. After briefly reviewing the literature on medical student burnout, the author uses two theories to elucidate potential causes: (...)
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  19. Yingying Lee, Manlai You & Ming-Ying Yang (forthcoming). A Survey of Student Opinions on Ethical Design Standards in Taiwan. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-26.score: 24.0
    Design ethics has been offered as a course in undergraduate design programs in Taiwan for over a decade, but research on teaching design ethics and the results of teaching these courses is scant. We conducted two tests to examine (1) the effect of an ethics course, and (2) the differences among the effects of design department, gender, and study year on student opinions regarding ethical design standards (EDSs) at the National Yunlin University of Science and Technology (YunTech) in Taiwan. (...)
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  20. Jun Ye (2009). Yi Wen Hua Bo Yi: Zhongguo Xian Dai Liu Ou Xue Ren Yu Xi Xue Dong Jian. Beijing da Xue Chu Ban She.score: 24.0
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  21. Ying Guo, Carol M. Connor, Virginia Tompkins & Frederick J. Morrison (2011). Classroom Quality and Student Engagement: Contributions to Third-Grade Reading Skills. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 22.0
    This study, using NICHD-Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development longitudinal data, investigated the effects of global classroom quality and students’ 3rd grade behavioral engagement on students’ 3rd grade reading achievement (n = 1364) and also examined the extent to which students’ 3rd grade behavioral engagement mediated the association between global classroom quality and children’s’ reading skills. Structural equation modeling (SEM) results revealed that controlling for family sociodemographic risk and students’ 1st grade reading achievement, global classroom quality significantly promote (...)
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  22. André Baier (2013). Student-Driven Courses on the Social and Ecological Responsibilities of Engineers. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (4):1469-1472.score: 22.0
    A group of engineering students at the Technical University of Berlin, Germany, designed a course on engineering ethics. The core element of the developed Blue Engineering course are self-contained teaching-units, “building blocks”. These building blocks typically cover one complex topic and make use of various teaching methods using moderators who lead discussions, rather than experts who lecture. Consequently, the students themselves started to offer the credited course to their fellow students who take an active role in further developing the course (...)
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  23. Wayne S. Mcgowan & Lee Partridge (2013). Student Engagement and Making Community Happen. Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-18.score: 21.0
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  24. Ruyu Hung (2013). Educational Hospitality and Trust in Teacher–Student Relationships: A Derridarian Visiting. Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (1):87-99.score: 21.0
  25. Doris Santoro Gómez (2008). Women's Proper Place and Student-Centered Pedagogy. Studies in Philosophy and Education 27 (5):313-333.score: 21.0
  26. Rachel E. Davis, Devavrata Joshi, Krishan Patel, M. Briggs & Charles A. Vincent (2013). The Medical Student as a Patient: Attitudes Towards Involvement in the Quality and Safety of Health Care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (5):812-818.score: 21.0
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  27. Ana M. Martínez-Alemán (2007). The Nature of the Gift: Accountability and the Professor-Student Relationship. Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (6):574–591.score: 21.0
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  28. Patricia M. Lampkin (1999). Mountains and Passes: Traversing the Landscape of Ethics and Student Affairs Administration. National Association of Student Personnel Administration.score: 21.0
     
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  29. Amy S. Nowacki (2013). Making the Grade in a Portfolio-Based System: Student Performance and the Student Perspective. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 21.0
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  30. Herbert Hewitt Stroup (1964). Toward a Philosophy of Organized Student Activities. Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press.score: 21.0
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  31. Gert Biesta (2010). Learner, Student, Speaker: Why It Matters How We Call Those We Teach. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (5):540-552.score: 20.0
    In this paper I discuss three different ways in which we can refer to those we teach: as learner, as student or as speaker. My interest is not in any aspect of teaching but in the question whether there can be such a thing as emancipatory education. Working with ideas from Jacques Rancière I offer the suggestion that emancipatory education can be characterised as education which starts from the assumption that all students can speak. It starts from the assumption, (...)
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  32. Julie E. Maybee (2011). Audience Matters: Teaching Issues of Race and Racism for a Predominantly Minority Student Body. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (8):853-873.score: 20.0
    Some of the literature about teaching issues of race and racism in classrooms has addressed matters of audience. Zeus Leonardo, for example, has argued that teachers should use the language of white domination, rather than white privilege, when teaching about race and racism because the former language presupposes a minority audience, while the latter addresses an imaginary or presupposed white one. However, there seems to be little discussion in the literature about teaching these issues to an audience that is in (...)
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  33. Gavin G. Enck (2013). Ideals of Student Excellence and Enhancement. Neuroethics 6 (1):155-164.score: 20.0
    Discussions about the permissibility of students using enhancements in education are often framed by the question, “Is a student who uses cognitive-enhancing drugs cheating?” While the question of cheating is interesting, it is but only one question concerning the permissibility of enhancement in education. Another interesting question is, “What kinds of students do we want in our academic institutions?” I suggest that one plausible answer to this question concerns the ideals of human excellence or virtues. The students we want (...)
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  34. Schuyler W. Henderson (2002). Medical Student Elegies: The Poetics of Caring. Journal of Medical Humanities 23 (2):119-132.score: 20.0
    This paper examines three medical student poems about death to explore how medical students use poetry to understand their encounters with dying patients and to discuss how these poems function as elegies in the context of medical culture.
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  35. Pat Cryer (2000). The Research Student's Guide to Success. Open University Press.score: 20.0
    "...{The first edition of Professor Cryer's book was} absolutely outstanding, in four main respects. First, it is comprehensive in its scope, covering everything from applying to undertaking a research degree. Second, it is applicable to PhDs across the board. Third, the book is exceptionally well written and highly readable. Finally, at each stage Pat Cryer has included questions and exercises to enable readers to reflect on their practice, check out whether they are on track and, if not, discover how they (...)
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  36. Charles R. R. Hayter (2006). Medicine's Moment of Misrule: The Medical Student Show. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 27 (4):215-229.score: 20.0
    Medical student shows are a prominent feature of medical student life around the world. Following a traditional vaudeville format of skits and songs, the shows are notorious for their exuberance, bawdiness, and lack of political correctness. Despite their widespread prevalence and sometimes hostile reactions, there has been no previous study of these shows. Based on research of scripts, programs, reviews, and oral history, this article explores their history and content and argues that, far from being irrelevant frivolities, these (...)
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  37. Daniel McCall & Ana S. Iltis (forthcoming). Health Care Voluntourism: Addressing Ethical Concerns of Undergraduate Student Participation in Global Health Volunteer Work. HEC Forum:1-13.score: 20.0
    The popularity and availability of global health experiences has increased, with organizations helping groups plan service trips and companies specializing in “voluntourism,” health care professionals volunteering their services through different organizations, and medical students participating in global health electives. Much has been written about global health experiences in resource poor settings, but the literature focuses primarily on the work of health care professionals and medical students. This paper focuses on undergraduate student involvement in short term medical volunteer work in (...)
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  38. Michael Huemer, Student Evaluations: A Critical Review.score: 18.0
    Informal student evaluations of faculty were started in the 1960's by enterprising college students.(1) Since then, their use has spread so that now they are administered in almost all American colleges and universities and are probably the main source of information used for evaluating faculty teaching performance.(2) There is an enormous literature on the subject of student evaluations of faculty (SEF).(3) The following is a summary of some developments in that literature that should be of special interest to (...)
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  39. Fred K. Beard (2003). College Student Attitudes Toward Advertising's Ethical, Economic, and Social Consequences. Journal of Business Ethics 48 (3):217-228.score: 18.0
    Little research has focused on college students'' attitudes toward advertising''s ethical, economic, and social consequences over the last two decades. Exploring and tracking the attitudes of college students toward advertising is important, however, for several reasons. College students represent an important segment of consumers for many marketers, negative attitudes toward advertising on the part of college students could lead to their support for restrictive regulation in the future, and there are potentially negative consequences concerning the effects of advertising that college (...)
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  40. Stephen A. Satris (1986). Student Relativism. Teaching Philosophy 9 (3):193-205.score: 18.0
    In this paper I offer an analysis of, and suggest some methods for dealing with, a quite particular and peculiar problem in teaching philosophy. It is, perhaps,not a problem essential to the discipline or to its teaching, but it is nevertheless one of the most serious, pervasive, and frustrating problems confronting mostphilosophy teachers today. I speak of the problem of student relativism-or, SR for short.
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  41. Chloë Taylor (2011). Disciplinary Relations/Sexual Relations: Feminist and Foucauldian Reflections on Professor–Student Sex. Hypatia 26 (1):187-206.score: 18.0
    Drawing on Michel Foucault's writings as well as the writings of feminist scholars bell hooks and Jane Gallop, this paper examines faculty–student sexual relations and the discourses and policies that surround them. It argues that the dominant discourses on professor–student sex and the policies that follow from them misunderstand the form of power that is at work within pedagogical institutions, and it examines some of the consequences that result from this misunderstanding. In Foucault's terms, we tend to theorize (...)
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  42. Neil Granitz & Dana Loewy (2007). Applying Ethical Theories: Interpreting and Responding to Student Plagiarism. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 72 (3):293 - 306.score: 18.0
    Given the tremendous proliferation of student plagiarism involving the Internet, the purpose of this study is to determine which theory of ethical reasoning students invoke when defending their transgressions: deontology, utilitarianism, rational self-interest, Machiavellianism, cultural relativism, or situational ethics. Understanding which theory of ethical reasoning students employ is critical, as preemptive steps can be taken by faculty to counteract this reasoning and prevent plagiarism. Additionally, it has been demonstrated that unethical behavior in school can lead to unethical behavior in (...)
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  43. Simone de Beauvoir, Barbara Klaw & Margaret A. Simons (eds.) (2006). Diary of a Philosophy Student, Volume 1: 1926-27. University of Illinois Press.score: 18.0
    Revelatory insights into the early life and thought of the preeminent French feminist philosopher Dating from her years as a philosophy student at the Sorbonne, this is the 1926-27 diary of the teenager who would become the famous French philosopher, author, and feminist, Simone de Beauvoir. Written years before her first meeting with Jean-Paul Sartre, these diaries reveal previously unknown details about her life and offer critical insights into her early philosophy and literary works. Presented here for the first (...)
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  44. Joan F. Goodman (2010). Respect-Due and Respect-Earned: Negotiating Student-Teacher Relationships. Ethics and Education 4 (1):3-17.score: 18.0
    Respect is a cardinal virtue in schools and foundational to our common ethical beliefs, yet its meaning is muddled. For philosophers Kant, Mill, and Rawls, whose influential theories span three centuries, respect includes appreciation of universal human dignity, equality, and autonomy. In their view children, possessors of human dignity, but without perspective and reasoning ability, are entitled only to the most minimal respect. While undeserving of mutual respect they are nonetheless expected to show unilateral respect. Dewey and Piaget, scions of (...)
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  45. Thorsten Botz-Bornstein (2010). Genes, Memes, and the Chinese Concept of Wen : Toward a Nature/Culture Model of Genetics. Philosophy East and West 60 (2):pp. 167-186.score: 18.0
    The Chinese concept of wen is examined here in the context of contemporary gene theory and the "cultural branch" of gene theory called "memetics." The Chinese notion of wen is an untranslatable term meaning "pattern," "structure," "writing," and "literature." Wen hua—generally translated as "culture"—signifies the process through which one adopts wen. However, this process is not simply one of civilizational mimesis or imitation but the "creation" of a new pattern. Within a gene-wen debate we are able to read genes neither (...)
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  46. Gregory K. Plagens (2011). Social Capital and Education: Implications for Student and School Performance. Education and Culture 27 (1):40-64.score: 18.0
    Scholars seeking to understand why some students and schools perform better than others have suggested that social capital might be part of the explanation. Social capital in today's terms is argued to be an intangible resource that emerges—or fails to emerge—from social relations and social structure. Use of the term in this sense has been traced to John Dewey's writings in 1900 in The Elementary School Record. The idea that outcomes in education are conditioned by social interactions has intuitive appeal. (...)
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  47. S. A. Stearns (2001). The Student-Instructor Relationship's Effect on Academic Integrity. Ethics and Behavior 11 (3):275 – 285.score: 18.0
    In this study, I surveyed students' evaluative perceptions of instructor behavior and their possible influence on academic dishonesty. Slightly over 20% of 1,369 student respondents admitted to academic dishonesty in at least 1 class during 1 term at college. Students who admitted to acts of academic dishonesty had lower overall evaluations of instructor behavior than students who reported not committing academic dishonesty. Implications for student learning and the enhancement of academic integrity in the classroom are discussed.
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  48. Diannah Lowry (2003). An Investigation of Student Moral Awareness and Associated Factors in Two Cohorts of an Undergraduate Business Degree in a British University: Implications for Business Ethics Curriculum Design. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 48 (1):7-19.score: 18.0
    Debate exists as to the timing of student exposure to business ethics modules, and the degree to which business ethics education is integrated throughout business school curricula. The argument for an integrated model of business ethics education is well documented, however, such arguments do not stem from an empirical basis. Much of the debate about when and how business ethics should be taught rests on assumptions regarding the stage of moral awareness of business students. The research reported here adds (...)
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  49. A. Carson-Stevens, M. M. Davies, R. Jones, A. D. Pawan Chik, I. J. Robbe & A. N. Fiander (2013). Framing Patient Consent for Student Involvement in Pelvic Examination: A Dual Model of Autonomy. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (11):676-680.score: 18.0
    Patient consent has been formulated in terms of radical individualism rather than shared benefits. Medical education relies on the provision of patient consent to provide medical students with the training and experience to become competent doctors. Pelvic examination represents an extreme case in which patients may legitimately seek to avoid contact with inexperienced medical students particularly where these are male. However, using this extreme case, this paper will examine practices of framing and obtaining consent as perceived by medical students. This (...)
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  50. Patricia R. Owen & Jennifer Zwahr-Castro (2007). Boundary Issues in Academia: Student Perceptions of Faculty - Student Boundary Crossings. Ethics and Behavior 17 (2):117 – 129.score: 18.0
    Boundary crossings in academia are rarely addressed by university policy despite the risk of problematic or unethical faculty - student interactions. This study contributes to an understanding of undergraduate college student perceptions of appropriateness of faculty - student nonsexual interactions by investigating the influence of gender and ethnicity on student judgments of the appropriateness of numerous hypothetical interactions. Overall, students deemed the majority of interactions as inappropriate. Female students judged a number of interactions as more inappropriate (...)
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