Search results for 'Wen-jiuan Yendoctoral Student' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  7
    Beth L. Rodgers Phd Rn Faanprofessor & Wen-jiuan Yendoctoral Student (2002). Re-Thinking Nursing Science Through the Understanding of Buddhism. Nursing Philosophy 3 (3):213–221.
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  2.  7
    Xing Wen (2013). Did King Wen of Zhou Develop the Zhouyi? Contemporary Chinese Thought 44 (3):60-85.
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  3.  9
    Beth L. Rodgers & Wen-Jiuan Yen (2002). Re-Thinking Nursing Science Through the Understanding of Buddhism. Nursing Philosophy 3 (3):213-221.
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  4. Dennis F. Thompson (1976). Bibliography: The Education of a Founding Father. The Reading List for John Witherspoon's Course in Political Theory, as Taken by James Madison. Political Theory 4 (4):523-529.
    ...Witherspoon's Course in Political Theory, as Taken by James Madison Dennis F. Thompson Princeton University [523...Witherspoon's Course in Political Theory, as Taken by James Madison. James Madison was an unusually wen-prepared student when, at eighteen...
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  5.  24
    E. Alpay (2013). Student-Inspired Activities for the Teaching and Learning of Engineering Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (4):1455-1468.
    Ethics teaching in engineering can be problematic because of student perceptions of its subjective, ambiguous and philosophical content. The use of discipline-specific case studies has helped to address such perceptions, as has practical decision making and problem solving approaches based on some ethical frameworks. However, a need exists for a wider range of creative methods in ethics education to help complement the variety of activities and learning experiences within the engineering curriculum. In this work, a novel approach is presented (...)
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  6.  34
    Sarah B. Laditka & Margaret M. Houck (2006). Student-Developed Case Studies: An Experiential Approach for Teaching Ethics in Management. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 64 (2):157 - 167.
    To prepare for ethically challenging situations in the workplace, it is useful for students to explore their attitudes toward ethical issues and their own value systems. An experiential assignment to teach ethics in business programs is presented. This method allows instructors to incorporate a “stand alone” assignment in ethics into a course that focuses on another area in management. The assignment, student-developed case studies of ethical situations in the workplace, requires students to develop individual case studies in ethics drawing (...)
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  7.  84
    Robert M. Siegfried (2004). Student Attitudes on Software Piracy and Related Issues of Computer Ethics. Ethics and Information Technology 6 (4):215-222.
    Software piracy is older than the PC and has been the subject of several studies, which have found it to be a widespread phenomenon in general, and among university students in particular. An earlier study by Cohen and Cornwell from a decade ago is replicated, adding questions about downloading music from the Internet. The survey includes responses from 224 students in entry-level courses at two schools, a nondenominational suburban university and a Catholic urban college with similar student profiles. The (...)
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  8.  23
    Arthur Coren (2011). Turning a Blind Eye: Faculty Who Ignore Student Cheating. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 9 (4):291-305.
    In this study, 40.3% of faculty members admitted to ignoring student cheating on one or more occasions. The quality of past experience in dealing with academic integrity violations was examined. Faculty members with previous bad experiences were more likely to prefer dealing with cheating by ignoring it. The data were further analysed to determine beliefs and attitudes that distinguish between faculty who have never ignored an instance of cheating and those who indicated that they have ignored one or more (...)
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  9.  7
    Rodney C. Roberts (2016). Are Some of the Things Faculty Do to Maximize Their Student Evaluation of Teachers Scores Unethical? Journal of Academic Ethics 14 (2):133-148.
    This paper provides a philosophical analysis of some of the things faculty do to maximize their Student Evaluation of Teachers scores. It examines 28 practices that are claimed to be unethical methods for maximizing SET scores. The paper offers an argument concerning the morality of each behavior and concludes that 13 of the 28 practices suggest unethical behavior. The remaining 15 behaviors are morally permissible.
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  10.  13
    Laura Welfare & Corrine Sackett (2010). Authorship in Student-Faculty Collaborative Research: Perceptions of Current and Best Practices. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (3):199-215.
    Determining appropriate authorship recognition in student-faculty collaborative research is a complex task. In this quantitative study, responses from 1346 students and faculty in education and some social science disciplines at 36 research-intensive institutions in the United States were analyzed to provide a description of current and recommended practices for authorship in student-faculty collaborative research. The responses revealed practices and perceptions that are not aligned with ethical guidelines and a lack of consensus among respondents about appropriate practice. Faculty and (...)
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  11.  13
    Mary E. Sunderland (2013). Using Student Engagement to Relocate Ethics to the Core of the Engineering Curriculum. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-18.
    One of the core problems with engineering ethics education is perceptual. Although ethics is meant to be a central component of today’s engineering curriculum, it is often perceived as a marginal requirement that must be fulfilled. In addition, there is a mismatch between faculty and student perceptions of ethics. While faculty aim to communicate the nuances and complexity of engineering ethics, students perceive ethics as laws, rules, and codes that must be memorized. This paper provides some historical context to (...)
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  12.  11
    Bradley J. Sleeper, Kenneth C. Schneider, Paula S. Weber & James E. Weber (2006). Scale and Study of Student Attitudes Toward Business Education's Role in Addressing Social Issues. Journal of Business Ethics 68 (4):381 - 391.
    Corporations and investors are responding to recent major ethical scandals with increased attention to the social impacts of business operations. In turn, business colleges and their international accrediting body are increasing their efforts to make students more aware of the social context of corporate activity. Business education literature lacks data on student attitudes toward such education. This study found that postscandal business students, particularly women, are indeed interested in it. Their interest is positively related to their past donation, volunteerism, (...)
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  13.  9
    Erika Löfström & Pauliina Kupila (2013). The Instructional Challenges of Student Plagiarism. Journal of Academic Ethics 11 (3):231-242.
    The focus of this article is university teachers’ and students’ views of plagiarism, plagiarism detection, and the use of plagiarism detection software as learning support. The data were collected from teachers and students who participated in a pilot project to test plagiarism detection software at a major university in Finland. The data were analysed through factor analysis, T-tests and inductive content analysis. Three distinct reasons for plagiarism were identified: intentional, unintentional and contextual. The teachers did not utilise plagiarism detection to (...)
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  14.  19
    Alia Al-Saji (2012). Creating Possibility: The Time of the Quebec Student Movement. Theory and Event 15 (3).
    Introduction: -/- Walking, illegally, down main Montreal thoroughfares with students in nightly demonstrations, with neighbors whom I barely knew before, banging pots and pans, and with tens, if not hundreds, of thousands of people on every 22nd of the month since March—this was unimaginable a year ago.1 Unimaginable that the collective and heterogeneous body, which is the “manif [demonstration]”, could feel so much like home, despite its internal differences. Unimaginable that this mutual dependence on one another could enable not only (...)
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  15.  3
    Kathryn M. Weston, Judy R. Mullan, Wendy Hu, Colin Thomson, Warren C. Rich, Patricia Knight-Billington, Brahmaputra Marjadi & Peter L. McLennan (2016). Academic Guidance in Medical Student Research: How Well Do Supervisors and Students Understand the Ethics of Human Research? Journal of Academic Ethics 14 (2):87-102.
    Research is increasingly recognised as a key component of medical curricula, offering a range of benefits including development of skills in evidence-based medicine. The literature indicates that experienced academic supervision or mentoring is important in any research activity and positively influences research output. The aim of this project was to investigate the human research ethics experiences and knowledge of three groups: medical students, and university academic staff and clinicians eligible to supervise medical student research projects; at two Australian universities. (...)
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  16.  13
    Michael H. Malloy (2012). The Osler Student Societies of the University of Texas Medical Branch: A Medical Professionalism Translational Tool. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 24 (4):273-278.
    This essay reviews some of the issues associated with the challenge of integrating the concepts of medical professionalism into the socialization and identity formation of the undergraduate medical student. A narrative-based approach to the integration of professionalism in medical education proposed by Coulehan (Acad Med 80(10):892–898, 2005) offers an appealing method to accomplish the task in a less didactic format and in a way that promotes more personal growth. In this essay, I review how the Osler Student Societies (...)
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  17.  1
    Ana M. Martínez-Alemán (2007). The Nature of the Gift: Accountability and the Professor-Student Relationship. Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (6):574–591.
    In this paper I introduce the theory of gift giving as a possible means to reconcile the contradictions inherent in accountability measures of ‘faculty productivity’ in the American university. In this paper I sketch the theory of gift economies to show how, given the historical ideals that characterize the faculty‐student relationship, a theory of gift giving could help us better judge the labor of the faculty. I suggest that it is the relational character of teaching that frustrates accountability measures (...)
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  18.  3
    M. L. Jennings (2009). Medical Student Burnout: Interdisciplinary Exploration and Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 30 (4):253-269.
    Burnout—a stress-related syndrome characterized by exhaustion, depersonalization, and a diminished sense of accomplishment—is a common phenomenon among medical students with significant potential consequences for student health, professionalism, and patient care. This essay proposes that the epidemic of medical student burnout can be attributed to a technocratic paradigm that fails to value medical students as persons with human needs and limitations. After briefly reviewing the literature on medical student burnout, the author uses two theories to elucidate potential causes: (...)
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  19.  2
    Lisa M. Robins & Peter J. Kanowski (2008). PhD by Publication: A Student's Perspective. Journal of Research Practice 4 (2):Article M3.
    This article presents the first author's experiences as an Australian doctoral student undertaking a PhD by publication in the arena of the social sciences. She published nine articles in refereed journals and a peer-reviewed book chapter during the course of her PhD. We situate this experience in the context of current discussion about doctoral publication practices, in order to inform both postgraduate students and academics in general. The article discusses recent thinking about PhD by publication and identifies the factors (...)
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  20.  20
    Cynthia D. Rittenhouse (1996). Survival Skills and Ethics Training for Graduate Students: A Graduate Student Perspective. Science and Engineering Ethics 2 (3):367-380.
    Graduate students in the sciences must develop practical skills geared toward scientific survival and success. This is particularly true now, given the paucity of research funds and jobs. Along with more elementary skills, research ethics should be an integral part of students’ scientific training. Survival skills include research skills, communication skills, general efficiency, and preparation for post-graduate work. Ethics training covers guidelines for use of animal and human subjects, data treatment, disclosure, credit issues, conflicts of interest, and response to misconduct. (...)
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  21.  22
    Corrine R. Sackett (2010). Authorship in Student-Faculty Collaborative Research: Perceptions of Current and Best Practices. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (3):199-215.
    Determining appropriate authorship recognition in student-faculty collaborative research is a complex task. In this quantitative study, responses from 1346 students and faculty in education and some social science disciplines at 36 research-intensive institutions in the United States were analyzed to provide a description of current and recommended practices for authorship in student-faculty collaborative research. The responses revealed practices and perceptions that are not aligned with ethical guidelines and a lack of consensus among respondents about appropriate practice. Faculty and (...)
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  22.  23
    Nalinaksha Bhattacharyya (2004). Student Evaluations and Moral Hazard. Journal of Academic Ethics 2 (3):263-271.
    Most universities solicit feedback from students at the end of a course in order to assess student perceptions of the course. This feedback is used for various objectives, including for evaluating teaching by academic administrators. One would therefore expect faculty to rationally take this into account while formulating their teaching strategy. In certain cases, such strategic considerations can give rise to moral hazard. I have modelled the situation using the well-known Prisoners Dilemma game and found that in equilibrium, the (...)
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  23.  3
    Yingying Lee, Manlai You & Ming-Ying Yang (2015). A Survey of Student Opinions on Ethical Design Standards in Taiwan. Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (2):505-530.
    Design ethics has been offered as a course in undergraduate design programs in Taiwan for over a decade, but research on teaching design ethics and the results of teaching these courses is scant. We conducted two tests to examine the effect of an ethics course, and the differences among the effects of design department, gender, and study year on student opinions regarding ethical design standards at the National Yunlin University of Science and Technology in Taiwan. The participants comprised 934 (...)
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  24.  1
    Dan Childers & Sam Bruton (2016). “Should It Be Considered Plagiarism?” Student Perceptions of Complex Citation Issues. Journal of Academic Ethics 14 (1):1-17.
    Most research on student plagiarism defines the concept very narrowly or with much ambiguity. Many studies focus on plagiarism involving large swaths of text copied and pasted from unattributed sources, a type of plagiarism that the overwhelming majority of students seem to have little trouble identifying. Other studies rely on ambiguous definitions, assuming students understand what the term means and requesting that they self-report how well they understand the concept. This study attempts to avoid these problems by examining (...) perceptions of more complex citation issues. We presented 240 students with a series of examples, asked them to indicate whether or not each should be considered plagiarism, and followed up with a series of demographic and attitudinal questions. The examples fell within the spectrum of inadequate citation, patchwriting, and the reuse of other people’s ideas. Half were excerpted from publicized cases of academic plagiarism, and half were modified from other sources. Our findings indicated that students shared a very strong agreement that near verbatim copy and paste and patchwriting should be considered plagiarism, but that they were much more conflicted regarding the reuse of ideas. Additionally, this study found significant correlation between self-reported confidence in their understanding and the identification of more complex cases as plagiarism, but this study found little correlation between academic class status or exposure to plagiarism detection software and perceptions of plagiarism. The latter finding goes against a prevailing sentiment in the academic literature that the ability to recognize plagiarism is inherently linked to academic literacy. Overall, our findings indicate that more pedagogical emphasis may need to be placed on complex forms of plagiarism. (shrink)
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  25.  1
    Colleen Halupa & Doris U. Bolliger (2015). Student Perceptions of Self-Plagiarism: A Multi-University Exploratory Study. Journal of Academic Ethics 13 (1):91-105.
    The purpose of this study was to assess student perceptions of self-plagiarism. Students at three university campuses offering graduate and undergraduate classes in a residential and online format were queried; 284 students responded. Overwhelmingly, students perceived they owned their own previous published works and over half reported they believed self-plagiarism should not be considered an academic honesty offense. Most faculty members did not provide information about self-plagiarism to their students. Only about one-fourth of the students reported recycling parts of (...)
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  26.  6
    André Baier (2013). Student-Driven Courses on the Social and Ecological Responsibilities of Engineers. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (4):1469-1472.
    A group of engineering students at the Technical University of Berlin, Germany, designed a course on engineering ethics. The core element of the developed Blue Engineering course are self-contained teaching-units, “building blocks”. These building blocks typically cover one complex topic and make use of various teaching methods using moderators who lead discussions, rather than experts who lecture. Consequently, the students themselves started to offer the credited course to their fellow students who take an active role in further developing the course (...)
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  27.  10
    Ruyu Hung (2013). Educational Hospitality and Trust in Teacher–Student Relationships: A Derridarian Visiting. Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (1):87-99.
  28.  50
    Wayne S. Mcgowan & Lee Partridge (2013). Student Engagement and Making Community Happen. Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (3):1-18.
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  29.  3
    Doris Santoro Gómez (2008). Women’s Proper Place and Student-Centered Pedagogy. Studies in Philosophy and Education 27 (5):313-333.
  30.  2
    Rachel E. Davis, Devavrata Joshi, Krishan Patel, M. Briggs & Charles A. Vincent (2013). The Medical Student as a Patient: Attitudes Towards Involvement in the Quality and Safety of Health Care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (5):812-818.
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  31. Patricia M. Lampkin (1999). Mountains and Passes: Traversing the Landscape of Ethics and Student Affairs Administration. National Association of Student Personnel Administration.
     
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  32. Thaddeus Metz (2016). The South African Student/Worker Uprisings in Light of Just War Theory. In Susan Booysen (ed.), FeesMustFall: Student Revolt, Decolonisation and Governance in South Africa. Wits University Press ch. 14.
    I critically examine the South African university student and worker protests of 2015/2016 in light of moral principles governing the use of force that are largely uncontested in both the contemporary Western and African philosophies of just war, violence and threats. Amongst these principles are: “discrimination”, according to which force should be directed not towards innocent bystanders but instead should target those particularly responsible for injustice; “likely success”, meaning that, instead of being counter-productive, the use of force must be (...)
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  33.  2
    Herbert Hewitt Stroup (1964). Toward a Philosophy of Organized Student Activities. Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press.
  34.  37
    John Danaher (forthcoming). Should We Use Commitment Contracts to Regulate Student Use of Cognitive Enhancing Drugs? Bioethics.
    Are universities justified in trying to regulate student use of cognitive enhancing drugs? In this paper I argue that they can be, but that the most appropriate kind of regulatory intervention is likely to be voluntary in nature. To be precise, I argue that universities could justifiably adopt a commitment contract system of regulation wherein students are encouraged to voluntarily commit to not using cognitive enhancing drugs (or to using them in a specific way). If they are found to (...)
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  35.  72
    Sandra Pellanda Dieci, Laura Weise & Anne Monnier (2012). Analyse contrastée des attentes et des représentations d’étudiants en formation initiale à l’enseignement secondaire en fonction de leur engagement ou non dans un établissement scolaireComparative analysis of the students’ expectations and representations in pre-service teacher training for secondary school depending on whether they have a student teaching placement or not. Phronesis 1 (2):63-81.
    In Geneva, since the beginning of pre-service secondary teacher training at university, two different types of students in teacher preparation coexist: some of them have got part-time classes, others have no teaching assignment. In an introduction to the teaching profession, students from different disciplines of the two types take a course on the same sources of professional knowledge. By analyzing the representations of the teaching profession, we find that the process of construction of their professional identity varies according to whether (...)
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  36.  26
    Diannah Lowry (2003). An Investigation of Student Moral Awareness and Associated Factors in Two Cohorts of an Undergraduate Business Degree in a British University: Implications for Business Ethics Curriculum Design. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 48 (1):7-19.
    Debate exists as to the timing of student exposure to business ethics modules, and the degree to which business ethics education is integrated throughout business school curricula. The argument for an integrated model of business ethics education is well documented, however, such arguments do not stem from an empirical basis. Much of the debate about when and how business ethics should be taught rests on assumptions regarding the stage of moral awareness of business students. The research reported here adds (...)
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  37.  16
    William R. Wynd & John Mager (1989). The Business and Society Course: Does It Change Student Attitudes? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 8 (6):487 - 491.
    The purpose of this research was to determine if there is a significant difference in the attitudes of students toward situations involving ethical decisions before and after taking a course in Business and Society. A simulated before and after design was used with Clark's personal business ethics and social responsibility scale serving as the measurement instrument. The result of the study indicated that the Business and society class had no statistically significant impact on student attitudes.
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  38.  55
    Neil Granitz & Dana Loewy (2007). Applying Ethical Theories: Interpreting and Responding to Student Plagiarism. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 72 (3):293 - 306.
    Given the tremendous proliferation of student plagiarism involving the Internet, the purpose of this study is to determine which theory of ethical reasoning students invoke when defending their transgressions: deontology, utilitarianism, rational self-interest, Machiavellianism, cultural relativism, or situational ethics. Understanding which theory of ethical reasoning students employ is critical, as preemptive steps can be taken by faculty to counteract this reasoning and prevent plagiarism. Additionally, it has been demonstrated that unethical behavior in school can lead to unethical behavior in (...)
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  39.  22
    Robert W. Kolodinsky, Timothy M. Madden, Daniel S. Zisk & Eric T. Henkel (2010). Attitudes About Corporate Social Responsibility: Business Student Predictors. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 91 (2):167 - 181.
    Four predictors were posited to affect business student attitudes about the social responsibilities of business, also known as corporate social responsibility (CSR). Applying Forsyth's (1980, "Journal of Personality and Social Psychology" 39, 175–184, 1992, "Journal of Business Ethics" 11, 461–470) personal moral philosophy model, we found that ethical idealism had a positive relationship with CSR attitudes, and ethical relativism a negative relationship. We also found materialism to be negatively related to CSR attitudes. Spirituality among business students did not significantly (...)
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  40.  68
    Gert Biesta (2010). Learner, Student, Speaker: Why It Matters How We Call Those We Teach. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (5):540-552.
    In this paper I discuss three different ways in which we can refer to those we teach: as learner, as student or as speaker. My interest is not in any aspect of teaching but in the question whether there can be such a thing as emancipatory education. Working with ideas from Jacques Rancière I offer the suggestion that emancipatory education can be characterised as education which starts from the assumption that all students can speak. It starts from the assumption, (...)
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  41.  10
    S. Shah & T. Wu (2008). The Medical Student Global Health Experience: Professionalism and Ethical Implications. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (5):375-378.
    Medical student and resident participation in global health experiences (GHEs) has significantly increased over the last decade. In response to growing student interest and the proven impact of such experiences on the education and career decisions of resident physicians, many medical schools have begun to establish programmes dedicated to global health education. For the innumerable benefits of GHEs, it is important to note that medical students have the potential to do more harm than good in these settings when (...)
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  42.  30
    Joshua Rust & Eric Schwitzgebel (2013). Ethicists' and Nonethicists' Responsiveness to Student E‐Mails: Relationships Among Expressed Normative Attitude, Self‐Described Behavior, and Empirically Observed Behavior. Metaphilosophy 44 (3):350-371.
    Do professional ethicists behave any morally better than other professors do? Do they show any greater consistency between their normative attitudes and their behavior? In response to a survey question, a large majority of professors (83 percent of ethicists, 83 percent of nonethicist philosophers, and 85 percent of nonphilosophers) expressed the view that “not consistently responding to student e-mails” is morally bad. A similarly large majority of professors claimed to respond to at least 95 percent of student e-mails. (...)
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  43.  93
    Daniel Cho (2005). Lessons of Love: Psychoanalysis and Teacher-Student Love. Educational Theory 55 (1):79-96.
    What is the relation of love and pedagogy? Two recent phenomena have called into question whether love has any place within pedagogy at all: teacher‐student sexual scandal and the standardization movement. As love walks the thin line between inspiration and sex, and as standardization has assumed love to be synonymous with bias, it has become more important than ever to provide a clear account of love and its relation to teaching. For this account, I turn to Lacanian psychoanalysis and, (...)
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  44.  14
    Linda Achey Kidwell (2001). Student Honor Codes as a Tool for Teaching Professional Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 29 (1-2):45 - 49.
    Today''s business students have grown up in a society where distinctions between right and wrong have become blurred and where unethical behavior is observed and even expected in high-profile leaders. Especially troubling is the impression educators have that many students no longer view cheating as morally wrong (Pavela and McCabe, 1993). By contrast, the general public is demanding higher ethics of businesspeople. In this environment, educators are challenged to instill ethical norms in business students, especially when recent research indicates that (...)
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  45.  6
    Saadia Mahmud & Tracey Bretag (2015). Integrity in Postgraduate Research: The Student Voice. Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (6):1657-1672.
    There is a limited understanding of the student perspective of integrity in postgraduate research. This is of concern given that ‘research trainees’ may have a vulnerable position in formal investigations of research misconduct. This paper analyses qualitative data drawn from an Australian online academic integrity survey in a mixed methods research study. This analysis complements the quantitative survey data analysed earlier and sought to explore factors contributing to postgraduate research students’ satisfaction with policy and process, the ways institutions can (...)
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  46.  16
    Patricia J. Carlson & Frances Burke (1998). Lessons Learned From Ethics in the Classroom: Exploring Student Growth in Flexibility, Complexity and Comprehension. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 17 (11):1179-1187.
    This study shows the link between teaching ethics in a college setting and the evolution of student thinking about ethical dilemmas. At the beginning of the semester, students have a rigid "black and white" conception of ethics. By the end of the semester, they are thinking more flexibly about the responsibilities of leaders in corporate ethical dilemmas, and they are able to appreciate complex situations that influence ethical behavior. The study shows that education in ethics produces more "enlightened" consumers (...)
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  47.  25
    Thomas Hobbes (2005). A Dialogue Between a Philosopher and a Student, of the Common Laws of England. Oxford University Press.
    This volume in the Clarendon Edition of the Works of Thomas Hobbes contains A dialogue between a philosopher and a student, of the common laws of England, edited by Alan Cromartie, supplemented by the important fragment "Questions relative to Hereditary Right," discovered and edited by Quentin Skinner. As a critique of common law by a great philosopher, the Dialogue should be essential reading for anybody interested in English political thought or legal theory. Cromartie has established when and why the (...)
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  48.  15
    Brian Talbot (2012). Student Relativism: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb. Teaching Philosophy 35 (2):171-187.
    I present a novel approach to teaching ethics to students who are moral relativists. I argue that we should not try to convince students to abandon moral relativism; while we can and should present arguments against the view, we should not try to use these arguments to change students’ minds. Attempts to convince student relativists to change their minds can be disrespectful, and often overlook the reasons why students are relativists. I explain how instead to show moral relativists that (...)
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  49.  27
    Gavin G. Enck (2013). Ideals of Student Excellence and Enhancement. Neuroethics 6 (1):155-164.
    Discussions about the permissibility of students using enhancements in education are often framed by the question, “Is a student who uses cognitive-enhancing drugs cheating?” While the question of cheating is interesting, it is but only one question concerning the permissibility of enhancement in education. Another interesting question is, “What kinds of students do we want in our academic institutions?” I suggest that one plausible answer to this question concerns the ideals of human excellence or virtues. The students we want (...)
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  50.  21
    Peter Ashworth, Ranald MacDonald & Madeleine Freewood (2003). The Student Lifeworld and the Meanings of Plagiarism. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 34 (2):257-278.
    As plagiarism is a notion specific to a particular culture and epoch, and is also understood in a variety of ways by individuals, particular attention must be paid to the putting of the phenomenological question, What is plagiarism in its appearing? Resolution of this issue leads us to locate students' perceptions and opinions within the lifeworld, and to seek an initially idiographic set of descriptions. Of twelve interview analyses, three are presented. A student who took an especially anxious line, (...)
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