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Wendy Austin [10]Wendy J. Austin [3]
  1. Wendy Austin (2012). Moral Distress and the Contemporary Plight of Health Professionals. HEC Forum 24 (1):27-38.
    Once a term used primarily by moral philosophers, “moral distress” is increasingly used by health professionals to name experiences of frustration and failure in fulfilling moral obligations inherent to their fiduciary relationship with the public. Although such challenges have always been present, as has discord regarding the right thing to do in particular situations, there is a radical change in the degree and intensity of moral distress being expressed. Has the plight of professionals in healthcare practice changed? “Plight” encompasses not (...)
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  2. Wendy J. Austin (2011). The Incommensurability of Nursing as a Practice and the Customer Service Model: An Evolutionary Threat to the Discipline. Nursing Philosophy 12 (3):158-166.
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  3. Deborah L. Olmstead, Shannon D. Scott & Wendy J. Austin (2010). Unresolved Pain in Children: A Relational Ethics Perspective. Nursing Ethics 17 (6):695-704.
    It is considered the right of children to have their pain managed effectively. Yet, despite extensive research findings, policy guidelines and practice standard recommendations for the optimal management of paediatric pain, clinical practices remain inadequate. Empirical evidence definitively shows that unrelieved pain in children has only harmful consequences, with no benefits. Contributing factors identified in this undermanaged pain include the significant role of nurses. Nursing attitudes and beliefs about children’s pain experiences, the relationships nurses share with children who are suffering, (...)
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  4. Wendy Austin, Erika Goble, Brendan Leier & Paul Byrne (2009). Compassion Fatigue: The Experience of Nurses. Ethics and Social Welfare 3 (2):195-214.
    The term compassion fatigue has come to be applied to a disengagement or lack of empathy on the part of care-giving professionals. Empathy and emotional investment have been seen as potentially costing the caregiver and putting them at risk. Compassion fatigue has been equated with burnout, secondary traumatic stress disorder, vicarious traumatization, secondary victimization or co-victimization, compassion stress, emotional contagion, and counter-transference. The results of a Canadian qualitative research project on nurses? experience of compassion fatigue are presented. Nurses, self-identified as (...)
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  5. Wendy Austin, Julija Kelecevic, Erika Goble & Joy Mekechuk (2009). An Overview of Moral Distress and the Paediatric Intensive Care Team. Nursing Ethics 16 (1):57-68.
    A summary of the existing literature related to moral distress (MD) and the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) reveals a high-tech, high-pressure environment in which effective teamwork can be compromised by MD arising from different situations related to: consent for treatment, futile care, end-of-life decision making, formal decision-making structures, training and experience by discipline, individual values and attitudes, and power and authority issues. Attempts to resolve MD in PICUs have included the use of administrative tools such as shift worksheets, the (...)
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  6. Joanne Whitty-Rogers, Marion Alex, Cathy MacDonald, Donna Pierrynowski Gallant & Wendy Austin (2009). Working with Children in End-of-Life Decision Making. Nursing Ethics 16 (6):743-758.
    Traditionally, physicians and parents made decisions about children’s health care based on western practices. More recently, with legal and ethical development of informed consent and recognition for decision making, children are becoming active participants in their care. The extent to which this is happening is however blurred by lack of clarity about what children — of diverse levels of cognitive development — are capable of understanding. Moreover, when there are multiple surrogate decision makers, parental and professional conflict can arise concerning (...)
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  7. Wendy J. Austin, Leon Kagan, Marlene Rankel & Vangie Bergum (2008). The Balancing Act: Psychiatrists' Experience of Moral Distress. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (1):89-97.
    Experiences of moral distress encountered in psychiatric practice were explored in a hermeneutic phenomenological study. Moral distress is the state experienced when moral choices and actions are thwarted by constraints. Psychiatrists describe struggling ‘to do the right thing’ for individual patients within a societal system that places unrealistic demands on psychiatric expertise. Certainty on the part of the psychiatrist is an expectation when judgments of dangerousness and/or the need for coercive treatments are made. This assumption, however, ignores the uncertainty and (...)
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  8. Wendy Austin (2007). The Terminal: A Tale of Virtue. Nursing Ethics 14 (1):54-61.
    The movie, The terminal, is used to illustrate Mac Intyre's description of virtue ethics. The terminal is a mythical tale about a traveler, Viktor Navorski, who is stranded by circumstances in a New York airport. Viktor is a person who, without a strict reliance on duty or rules, has developed the disposition to act well despite variation in his circumstances. His character is revealed in contrast to that of three other characters: a cleaner, a flight attendant and the airport manager. (...)
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  9. Wendy Austin, Vangie Bergum, Simon Nuttgens & Cindy Peternelj-Taylor (2006). A Re-Visioning of Boundaries in Professional Helping Relationships: Exploring Other Metaphors. Ethics and Behavior 16 (2):77 – 94.
    There are many ethical issues arising for practitioners in what are termed the boundaries of professional helping relationships. In this article, the authors argue that the boundary metaphor is not sufficient for conceptualizing these ethical issues and propose that alternative metaphors be considered. The use of a different metaphor might allow practitioners to re-vision the relationship issues in a more realistic, richer, and holistic way. Those explored here include highway, bridge, and territory. For the authors, it is territory that seems (...)
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  10. Wendy Austin, Gillian Lemermeyer, Miriam Brouillet & Leigh Turner (2005). Anderson-Shaw, Lisa, Meadow, William with Policy? HEC Forum 17 (4):327-329.
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  11. Wendy Austin, Gillian Lemermeyer, Lisa Goldberg, Vangie Bergum & Melissa S. Johnson (2005). Moral Distress in Healthcare Practice: The Situation of Nurses. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 17 (1):33-48.
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  12. Wendy Austin, Marlene Rankel, Leon Kagan, Vangie Bergum & Gillian Lemermeyer (2005). To Stay or to Go, to Speak or Stay Silent, to Act or Not to Act: Moral Distress as Experienced by Psychologists. Ethics and Behavior 15 (3):197 – 212.
    The moral distress of psychologists working in psychiatric and mental health care settings was explored in an interdisciplinary, hermeneutic phenomenological study situated at the University of Alberta, Canada. Moral distress is the state experienced when moral choices and actions are thwarted by constraints. Psychologists described specific incidents in which they felt their integrity had been compromised by such factors as institutional and interinstitutional demands, team conflicts, and interdisciplinary disputes. They described dealing with the resulting moral distress by such means as (...)
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  13. Wendy Austin, Vangie Bergum & Lisa Goldberg (2003). Unable to Answer the Call of Our Patients: Mental Health Nurses' Experience of Moral Distress. Nursing Inquiry 10 (3):177-183.
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