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Wendy Lipworth [16]Wendy L. Lipworth [1]
  1. Bronwen Morrell, Wendy L. Lipworth, Rowena Forsyth, Christopher F. C. Jordens & Ian Kerridge (2014). Power and Control in Interactions Between Journalists and Health-Related Industries: The View From Industry. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):233-244.
    The mass media is a major source of health information for the public, and as such the quality and independence of health news reporting is an important concern. Concerns have been expressed that journalists reporting on health are increasingly dependent on their sources—including representatives of industries responsible for manufacturing health-related products—for story ideas and content. Many critics perceive an imbalance of power between journalists and industry sources, with industry being in a position of relative power, however the empirical evidence to (...)
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  2. Narcyz Ghinea, Wendy Lipworth, Miles Little, Ian Kerridge & Richard Day (2013). Overcoming Entrenched Disagreements: The Case of Misoprostol for Post‐Partum Haemorrhage. Developing World Bioethics 14 (3):n/a-n/a.
    The debate about whether misoprostol should be distributed to low resource communities to prevent post-partum haemorrhage (PPH), recognised as a major cause of maternal mortality, is deeply polarised. This is in spite of stakeholders having access to the same evidence about the risks and benefits of misoprostol. To understand the disagreement, we conducted a qualitative analysis of the values underpinning debates surrounding community distribution of misoprostol. We found that different moral priorities, epistemic values, and attitudes towards uncertainty were the main (...)
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  3. Wendy Lipworth, Miles Little, Pippa Markham, Jill Gordon & Ian Kerridge (2013). Doctors on Status and Respect: A Qualitative Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (2):205-217.
    While doctors generally enjoy considerable status, some believe that this is increasingly threatened by consumerism, managerialism, and competition from other health professions. Research into doctors’ perceptions of the changes occurring in medicine has provided some insights into how they perceive and respond to these changes but has generally failed to distinguish clearly between concerns about “status,” related to the entitlements associated with one’s position in a social hierarchy, and concerns about “respect,” related to being held in high regard for one’s (...)
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  4. Wendy Lipworth, Kathleen Montgomery & Miles Little (2013). How Pharmaceutical Industry Employees Manage Competing Commitments in the Face of Public Criticism. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (3):355-367.
    The pharmaceutical industry has been criticised for pervasive misconduct. These concerns have generally resulted in increasing regulation. While such regulation is no doubt necessary, it tends to assume that everyone working for pharmaceutical companies is equally motivated by commerce, without much understanding of the specific views and experiences of those who work in different parts of the industry. In order to gain a more nuanced picture of the work that goes on in the “medical affairs” departments of pharmaceutical companies, we (...)
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  5. Rowena Forsyth, Bronwen Morrell, Wendy Lipworth, Ian Kerridge, Christopher F. C. Jordens & Simon Chapman (2012). Health Journalists' Perceptions of Their Professional Roles and Responsibilities for Ensuring the Veracity of Reports of Health Research. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 27 (2):130 - 141.
    Health industries attempt to influence the public through the news media and through their relationships with expert academics and opinion leaders. This study reports journalists' perceptions of their professional roles and responsibilities regarding the relationships between industry and academia and research results. Journalists believe that responsibility for the scientific validity of their reports rests with academics and systems of peer review. However, this approach fails to account for the extent of industry-academy interactions and the flaws of peer review. Health journalists' (...)
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  6. Wendy Lipworth, Ian Kerridge, Miles Little, Jill Gordon & Pippa Markham (2012). Meaning and Value in Medical School Curricula. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):1027-1035.
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  7. Miles Little, Wendy Lipworth, Jill Gordon, Pippa Markham & Ian Kerridge (2012). Values‐Based Medicine and Modest Foundationalism. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):1020-1026.
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  8. Helen Crowther, Wendy Lipworth & Ian Kerridge (2011). Evidence‐Based Medicine and Epistemological Imperialism: Narrowing the Divide Between Evidence and Illness. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):868-872.
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  9. Ian Kerridge & Wendy Lipworth (2011). Shifting Power Relations and the Ethics of Journal Peer Review. Social Epistemology 25 (1):97-121.
    Peer review of manuscripts has recently become a subject of academic research and ethical debate. Critics of the review process argue that it is a means by which powerful members of the scientific community maintain their power, and achieve their personal and communal aspirations, often at others' expense. This qualitative study aimed to generate a rich, empirically?grounded understanding of the process of manuscript review, with a view to informing strategies to improve the review process. Open?ended interviews were carried out with (...)
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  10. Wendy Lipworth, Ian Kerridge, Stacy Carter & Miles Little (2011). Should Biomedical Publishing Be “Opened Up”? Toward a Values-Based Peer-Review Process. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (3):267-280.
    Peer review of manuscripts for biomedical journals has become a subject of intense ethical debate. One of the most contentious issues is whether or not peer review should be anonymous. This study aimed to generate a rich, empirically-grounded understanding of the values held by journal editors and peer reviewers with a view to informing journal policy. Qualitative methods were used to carry out an inductive analysis of biomedical reviewers’ and editors’ values. Data was derived from in-depth, open-ended interviews with journal (...)
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  11. Wendy Lipworth & Ian Kerridge (2010). Impediments to “T2” Research: Are Ethics Really to Blame? American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):39-40.
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  12. Ian Kerridge, Stacy M. Carter & Wendy Lipworth (2008). The “EBM Movement”: Where Did It Come From, Where is It Going, and Why Does It Matter? Social Epistemology 22 (4):425-431.
    Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) has now been part of the dominant medical paradigm for 15 years, and has been frequently debated and progressively modified. One question about EBM that has not yet been considered systematically, and is now particularly timely, is the question of the novelty, or otherwise, of the principles and practices of EBM. We argue that answering this question, and the related question of whether EBM-type principles and practices are unique to medicine, sheds new light on EBM and has (...)
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  13. Paul A. Komesaroff, Ian Kerridge & Wendy Lipworth (2008). The Epistemology and Ethics of Journal Reviewing: A Second Look. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (1):3-6.
  14. Wendy Lipworth, Stacy M. Carter & Ian Kerridge (2008). The “Ebm Movement”: Where Did It Come From, Where is It Going, and Why Does It Matter? Social Epistemology 22 (4):425 – 431.
    Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) has now been part of the dominant medical paradigm for 15 years, and has been frequently debated and progressively modified. One question about EBM that has not yet been considered systematically, and is now particularly timely, is the question of the novelty, or otherwise, of the principles and practices of EBM. We argue that answering this question, and the related question of whether EBM-type principles and practices are unique to medicine, sheds new light on EBM and has (...)
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  15. Wendy Lipworth, Bronwen Morrell & Ian Kerridge (2008). Ethics as an Act of Listening. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (10):80-81.
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  16. Wendy Lipworth (2005). Generating a Taxonomy of Regulatory Responses to Emerging Issues in Biomedicine. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 2 (3):130-141.
    In the biomedical field, calls for the generation of new regulations or for the amendment of existing regulations often follow the emergence of apparently new research practices (such as embryonic stem cell research), clinical practices (such as facial transplantation) and entities (such as Avian Influenza/’Bird Flu’). Calls for regulatory responses also arise as a result of controversies which bring to light longstanding practices, such as the call for increased regulation of human tissue collections that followed the discovery of unauthorised post-mortem (...)
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