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Wes Sharrock [22]Wesley W. Sharrock [1]
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Profile: Wes Sharrock (Victoria University of Manchester)
  1. Christian Greiffenhagen & Wes Sharrock, Linguistic Relativism: Logic, Grammar, and Arithmetic in Cultural Comparison.
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  2. Rupert Read & Wes Sharrock (2012). 4 Kuhn's Fundamental Insight. In Vasō Kintē & Theodore Arabatzis (eds.), Kuhn's the Structure of Scientific Revolutions Revisited. Routledge. 64.
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  3. Wes Sharrock (2009). Closet Cartesianism in Discursive Psychology. In Ivan Leudar & Alan Costall (eds.), Against Theory of Mind. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  4. Wes Sharrock & Jeff Coulter (2009). Tom : A Critical Commentary Continued. In Ivan Leudar & Alan Costall (eds.), Against Theory of Mind. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  5. Christian Greiffenhagen & Wes Sharrock (2008). Where Do the Limits of Experience Lie? Abandoning the Dualism of Objectivity and Subjectivity. History of the Human Sciences 21 (3):70-93.
    The relationship between 'subjective' and 'objective' features of social reality (and between 'subjectivist' and 'objectivist' sociological approaches) remains problematic within social thought. Phenomenology is often taken as a paradigmatic example of subjectivist sociology, since it supposedly places exclusive emphasis on actors' 'subjective' interpretations, thereby neglecting 'objective' social structures. In this article, we question whether phenomenology is usefully understood as falling on either side of the standard divides, arguing that phenomenology's conception of 'subjective' experience of social reality includes many features taken (...)
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  6. Wes Sharrock & Jeff Coulter (2007). Revisiting 'the Unconscious'. In Danièle Moyal-Sharrock (ed.), Perspicuous Presentations: Essays on Wittgenstein's Philosophy of Psychology. Palgrave Macmillan.
     
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  7. Christian Greiffenhagen & Wes Sharrock (2006). Mathematical Relativism: Logic, Grammar, and Arithmetic in Cultural Comparison. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 36 (2):97–117.
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  8. Ivan Leudar & Wes Sharrock (2003). Changing the Past? History of the Human Sciences 16 (3):105-121.
    The value of the notion of ‘indeterminacy in the past’ continues to be contested. Ian Hacking’s claim that the notion is perspicuous in the examination of historical instances is questioned through discussion of the possibility of retrospective application of the relatively recent diagnostic category ‘Post-traumatic stress disorder’. Kevin McMillan maintains that there are deeper philosophical merits to the idea–particularly with respect to questions of truth–but neither Hacking’s treatment of historical cases nor McMillan’s directly philosophical elaboration of Hacking’s position sustain this (...)
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  9. Wes Sharrock & Ivan Leudar (2003). Action, Description, Redescription and Concept Change: A Reply to Fuller and Roth. History of the Human Sciences 16 (2):101-115.
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  10. Wes Sharrock & Rupert Read (2003). Does Thomas Kuhn Have a 'Model of Science'? Social Epistemology 17 (2-3):293-296.
  11. Jeff Coulter & Wes Sharrock (2002). The Hinterland of the Chinese Room. In John M. Preston & John Mark Bishop (eds.), Views Into the Chinese Room: New Essays on Searle and Artificial Intelligence. Oxford University Press. 181.
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  12. Rupert Read & Wes Sharrock (2002). Kripke's Conjuring Trick. Journal of Thought 37:3-65.
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  13. Rupert Read & Wes Sharrock (2002). Thomas Kuhn's Misunderstood Relation to Kripke-Putnam Essentialism. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 33 (1):151-8.
    Kuhn's ‘taxonomic conception’ of natural kinds enables him to defend and re-specify the notion of incommensurability against the idea that it is reference, not meaning/use, that is overwhelmingly important. Kuhn's ghost still lacks any reason to believe that referentialist essentialism undercuts his central arguments in SSR – and indeed, any reason to believe that such essentialism is even coherent, considered as a doctrine about anything remotely resembling our actual science. The actual relation of Kuhn to Kripke-Putnam essentialism, is as follows: (...)
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  14. Wes Sharrock & Ivan Leudar (2002). Indeterminacy in the Past? History of the Human Sciences 15 (3):95-115.
    This article discusses some issues that arise from the fact of `conceptual change'. We focus on the difficulties that Ian Hacking encountered when considering whether the consequence of conceptual change is the fact that the past of individual actions is indeterminate (Hacking, 1995). We consider his use of Anscombe's thesis on actions under description and find that he misrepresents it. We further find that he neglects tenses of descriptions and redescriptions, the contrast of which is essential to concepts that entail (...)
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  15. Wes Sharrock (2001). Fundamentals of Ethnomethodology. In Barry Smart & George Ritzer (eds.), Handbook of Social Theory. Sage. 249--259.
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  16. Graham Button, Jeff Coulter, John R. E. Lee & Wes Sharrock (2000). Re-Entering the Chinese Room. Minds and Machines 10 (1):149-152.
  17. Wes Sharrock & Wil Coleman (2000). It Don't Mean a Thing: On What Computers Have to Say. Communication and Cognition. Monographies 33 (1-2):83-95.
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  18. Wes Sharrock & Graham Button (1999). Do the Right Thing! Rule Finitism, Rule Scepticism and Rule Following. Human Studies 22 (2-4):193-210.
    Rule following is often made an unnecessary mystery in the philosophy of social science. One form of mystification is the issue of 'rule finitism', which raises the puzzle as to how a learner can possibly extend the rule to applications beyond those examples which have been given as instruction in the rule. Despite the claim that this problem originated in the work of Wittgenstein, it is clear that his philosophical method is designed to evaporate, not perpetuate, such problems. The supposed (...)
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  19. Wil Coleman & Wes Sharrock (1998). Unconstructive. In Irving Velody & Robin Williams (eds.), The Politics of Constructionism. Sage Publications.
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  20. Wes Sharrock & N. Ikeya (1998). The Practical Management of Visual Orientation. Communication and Cognition. Monographies 31 (2-3):229-242.
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  21. Graham Button, Jeff Coulter, John R. E. Lee & Wes Sharrock (1995). Computers, Minds, and Conduct. Polity Press.
  22. Graham Button & Wes Sharrock (1993). A Disagreement Over Agreement and Consensus in Constructionist Sociology. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 23 (1):1–25.
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  23. Wesley W. Sharrock & Roy Turner (1980). Observation, Esoteric Knowledge, and Automobiles. Human Studies 3 (1):19 - 31.
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