Search results for 'Whiteford Boyle' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Whiteford Boyle & E. John (1977). Beyond the Present Prospect: The Impact of the Xxth Century Revolutions in Science on the Varieties of Ethical & Religious Experience. Wheat Forder's Press.
     
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  2. Robert Boyle (2008). The Excellencies of Robert Boyle. Broadview Press.
    Robert Boyle, one of the most important intellectuals of the seventeenth century, was a gifted experimenter, an exceptionally able philosopher, and a dedicated Christian. In Boyle's two Excellencies, The Excellency of Theology Compared with Natural Philosophy and About The Excellency and Grounds of the Mechanical Hypothesis, he explains and justifies his new philosophy of science while reconciling it with Christian theology. These pioneering works of early science and theology are now available in a modernized and accessible new edition. (...)
     
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  3.  3
    Robert Boyle (1999). The Works of the Honourable Robert Boyle. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  4. Robert Boyle & M. A. Stewart (1979). Selected Philosophical Papers of Robert Boyle. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  5.  4
    Robert Boyle (2010). And on the Role of ANALOGY. Boyle is Perhaps the Thinker Who Had the Greatest Positive Influ. In S. J. Savonius-Wroth Paul Schuurman & Jonathen Walmsley (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Locke. Continuum 47.
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  6. Robert Boyle (1689). A Catalogue of the Philosophical Books and Tracts. Printed by Edw. Jones.
     
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  7.  44
    Joseph Boyle (1997). Just and Unjust Wars: Casuistry and the Boundaries of the Moral World. Ethics and International Affairs 11 (1):83–98.
    Joseph Boyle discusses deontology, which derives precepts from moral principles, particularly making a case with reference to Alan Donagan's The Theory of Morality, which appeared the same year as Just and Unjust Wars.
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  8. James Boyle (ed.) (1992). Critical Legal Studies. New York University Press.
    This volume surveys the current state of the critical Legal Studies movement- a fifteen year old initiative whose proponents are committed to building a strong progrsseve community inside law schools and the legal profession. In his introduciton, Boyle argues that CLS has succeeded because it analyzes the inadequacies of rights talk, technocracy, and law and economics, and because it connects theory with the everyday experiences of lawyers and legal scholars. Articles present the CLS perspective on legal reasoning, legal hisory, (...)
     
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  9. Richard Boyle (2015). Natural Novelty: The Newness Manifest in Existence. Upa.
    Why do new things happen? Boyle answers through consideration of a conceptual history of the new, logical formalization of how novelty occurs, discussion of the relevance of novelty to scientific questions surrounding Earth, life and consciousness, and integrative reading of the respective philosophies of Ludwig Wittgenstein and Martin Heidegger.
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  10. Richard P. Boyle (2015). Realizing Awakened Consciousness: Interviews with Buddhist Teachers and a New Perspective on the Mind. Cup.
    If, as Buddhism claims, the potential for awakening exists in all human beings, we should be able to map the phenomenon with the same science we apply to other forms of consciousness. A student of cognitive social science and a Zen practitioner for more than forty years, Richard P. Boyle brings his sophisticated perspective to bear on the development of a theoretical model for both ordinary and awakened consciousness. Boyle conducts probing interviews with eleven prominent Western Buddhist teachers (...)
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  11.  75
    Matthew Boyle (2016). Additive Theories of Rationality: A Critique. European Journal of Philosophy 23 (4).
    Additive theories of rationality, as I use the term, are theories that hold that an account of our capacity to reflect on perceptually-given reasons for belief and desire-based reasons for action can begin with an account of what it is to perceive and desire, in terms that do not presuppose any connection to the capacity to reflect on reasons, and then can add an account of the capacity for rational reflection, conceived as an independent capacity to ‘monitor’ and ‘regulate’ our (...)
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  12. Matthew Boyle (2011). Transparent Self-Knowledge. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):223-241.
    I distinguish two ways of explaining our capacity for ‘transparent’ knowledge of our own present beliefs, perceptions, and intentions: an inferential and a reflective approach. Alex Byrne (2011) has defended an inferential approach, but I argue that this approach faces a basic difficulty, and that a reflective approach avoids the difficulty. I conclude with a brief sketch and defence of a reflective approach to our transparent self-knowledge, and I show how this approach is connected with the thesis that we must (...)
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  13. Matthew Boyle (2009). Two Kinds of Self-Knowledge. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 78 (1):133-164.
    I argue that a variety of influential accounts of self-knowledge are flawed by the assumption that all immediate, authoritative knowledge of our own present mental states is of one basic kind. I claim, on the contrary, that a satisfactory account of self-knowledge must recognize at least two fundamentally different kinds of self-knowledge: an active kind through which we know our own judgments, and a passive kind through which we know our sensations. I show that the former kind of self-knowledge is (...)
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  14. Matthew Boyle (2011). 'Making Up Your Mind' and the Activity of Reason. Philosophers' Imprint 11 (17).
    A venerable philosophical tradition holds that we rational creatures are distinguished by our capacity for a special sort of mental agency or self-determination: we can “make up” our minds about whether to accept a given proposition. But what sort of activity is this? Many contemporary philosophers accept a Process Theory of this activity, according to which a rational subject exercises her capacity for doxastic self-determination only on certain discrete occasions, when she goes through a process of consciously deliberating about whether (...)
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  15.  84
    Matthew Boyle (2015). Critical Study: Cassam on Self‐Knowledge for Humans. European Journal of Philosophy 23 (2):337-348.
    This paper is a critical study of Quassim Cassam’s Self-Knowledge for Humans (Oxford University Press, 2014). Cassam claims that theorists who emphasize the “transparency” of questions about our own attitudes to questions about the wider world are committed to an excessively rationalistic conception of human thought. I dispute this, and make some clarificatory points about how to understand the relevant notion of “transparency”. I also argue that Cassam’s own “inferentialist” account of attitudinal self-knowledge entails an unacceptable alienation from our own (...)
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  16. J. J. Fraser, Diana Reiss, Paul Boyle, Katherine Lemcke, Jessica Sickler, Elizabeth Elliott, Barbara Newman & Sarah Gruber (2006). Dolphins in Popular Literature and Media. Society and Animals 14 (4):321.
    This review of how dolphins are portrayed in popular media reveals four themes that may influence public acceptance of current scientific research into dolphin cognition. These themes are: dolphin as peer to humans, of equal intelligence or at least capable of communicating with or helping humans; the dolphin as the representation of a romantic notion of ideal freedom in nature, embodying principles of peace, harmony or love; the dolphin as a naïve, innocent being that is subordinate and in need of (...)
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  17. Joseph Boyle (2004). Medical Ethics and Double Effect: The Case of Terminal Sedation. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (1):51-60.
    The use of terminal sedation to control theintense discomfort of dying patients appearsboth to be an established practice inpalliative care and to run counter to the moraland legal norm that forbids health careprofessionals from intentionally killingpatients. This raises the worry that therequirements of established palliative care areincompatible with moral and legal opposition toeuthanasia. This paper explains how thedoctrine of double effect can be relied on todistinguish terminal sedation from euthanasia. The doctrine of double effect is rooted inCatholic moral casuistry, but (...)
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  18. J. Boyle (1997). Intentions, Christian Morality, and Bioethics: Puzzles of Double Effect. Christian Bioethics 3 (2):87-88.
  19.  33
    Deborah Boyle (2013). Margaret Cavendish on Gender, Nature, and Freedom. Hypatia 28 (3):516-532.
    Some scholars have argued that Margaret Cavendish was ambivalent about women's roles and capabilities, for she seems sometimes to hold that women are naturally inferior to men, but sometimes that this inferiority is due to inferior education. I argue that attention to Cavendish's natural philosophy can illuminate her views on gender. In section II I consider the implications of Cavendish's natural philosophy for her views on male and female nature, arguing that Cavendish thought that such natures were not fixed. However, (...)
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  20. Matthew Boyle (2009). Active Belief. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 39 (sup1):119-147.
    I argue that cognitively mature human beings have an important sort of control or discretion over their own beliefs, but that to make good sense of this control, we must reject the common idea that it consists in a capacity to act on our belief-state by forming new beliefs or modifying ones we already hold. I propose that we exercise agential control over our beliefs, not primarily in doing things to alter our belief-state, but in holding whatever beliefs we hold. (...)
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  21.  64
    Matthew Boyle & Douglas Lavin (2010). Goodness and Desire. In Sergio Tenenbaum (ed.), Desire, Practical Reason, and the Good. Oxford University Press 161--201.
  22. John Finnis, Joseph Boyle & Germain Grisez (1988). Nuclear Deterrence, Morality and Realism. Clarendon Press.
    Nuclear deterrence requires objective ethical analysis. In providing it, the authors face realities - the Soviet threat, possible nuclear holocaust, strategic imperatives - but they also unmask moral evasions - deterrence cannot be bluff, pure counterforce, the lesser (or greater) evil, or a step towards disarmament. They conclude that the deterrent is unjustifiable and examine the new question of conscience that this raises for everyone.
     
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  23. Matthew Boyle (2010). Bar-on on Self-Knowledge and Expression. Acta Analytica 25 (1):9-20.
    I critically discuss the account of self-knowledge presented in Dorit Bar-On’s Speaking My Mind (OUP 2004), focusing on Bar-On’s understanding of what makes our capacity for self-knowledge puzzling and on her ‘neo-expressivist’ solution to the puzzle. I argue that there is an important aspect of the problem of self-knowledge that Bar-On’s account does not sufficiently address. A satisfying account of self-knowledge must explain not merely how we are able to make accurate avowals about our own present mental states, but how (...)
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  24. Matthew Boyle (forthcoming). Kant and the Significance of Self-Consciousness. Philosophy.
    Human beings who have mastered a natural language are self-conscious creatures: they can think, and indeed speak, about themselves in the first person. This dissertation is about the significance of this capacity: what it is and what difference it makes to our minds. My thesis is that the capacity for self-consciousness is essential to rationality, the thing that sets the minds of rational creatures apart from those of mere brutes. This, I argue, is what Kant was getting at in a (...)
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  25. Mary-Ellen Boyle (2004). Walking Our Talk: Business Schools, Legitimacy, and Citizenship. Business and Society 43 (1):37-68.
  26.  86
    Joseph Boyle (1991). Who is Entitled to Double Effect? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 16 (5):475-494.
    The doctrine of double effect continues to be an important tool in bioethical casuistry. Its role within the Catholic moral tradition continues, and there is considerable interest in it by contemporary moral philosophers. But problems of justification and correct application remain. I argue that if the traditional Catholic conviction that there are exceptionless norms prohibiting inflicting some kinds of harms on people is correct, then double effect is justified and necessary. The objection that double effect is superfluous is a rejection (...)
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  27.  6
    J. Boyle (2015). Franciscan Compassion and Catholic Bioethical Engagement. Christian Bioethics 21 (1):35-55.
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  28.  7
    Brett A. Boyle (2000). The Impact of Customer Characteristics and Moral Philosophies on Ethicaljudgments of Salespeople. Journal of Business Ethics 23 (3):249 - 267.
    This study considers customer characteristics as situational influences on a salesperson'sethical judgment formation. Specifically, customer gender, income, and propensity to buy were considered as factors which may bias these judgments. Additionally, the gender of the salesperson and their moral value structure were examined as moderating effects. An experiment using real estate agents reading hypothetical sales scenarios revealed differences across (1) customer gender, (2) customer income, and (3) level of the respondent'sidealism. Significant interactive effects with these factors were also found involving (...)
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  29. Joseph Boyle (2003). Symposium: Responding to Terror. Just War Doctrine and the Military Response to Terrorism. Journal of Political Philosophy 11 (2):153–170.
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  30.  78
    Diana Reiss, Barbara Newman, Sarah Gruber, Paul Boyle, Katherine Lemcke, John Fraser, Jessica Sickler & Elizabeth Elliott (2006). Dolphins in Popular Literature and Media. Society and Animals 14 (4):321-349.
    This review of how dolphins are portrayed in popular media reveals four themes that may influence public acceptance of current scientific research into dolphin cognition. These themes are: dolphin as peer to humans, of equal intelligence or at least capable of communicating with or helping humans; the dolphin as the representation of a romantic notion of ideal freedom in nature, embodying principles of peace, harmony or love; the dolphin as a naïve, innocent being that is subordinate and in need of (...)
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  31.  19
    Deborah Boyle (2015). Margaret Cavendish on Perception, Self‐Knowledge, and Probable Opinion. Philosophy Compass 10 (7):438-450.
    Scholarly interest in Margaret Cavendish's philosophical views has steadily increased over the past decade, but her epistemology has received little attention, and no consensus has emerged; Cavendish has been characterized as a skeptic, as a rationalist, as presenting an alternative epistemology to both rationalism and empiricism, and even as presenting no clear theory of knowledge at all. This paper concludes that Cavendish was only a modest skeptic, for she believed that humans can achieve knowledge through sensitive and rational perception as (...)
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  32.  5
    G. Grisez, J. Boyle & J. Finnis (1987). Practical Principles, Moral Truth, and Ultimate Ends. American Journal of Jurisprudence 32 (1):99-151.
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  33. Germain Gabriel Grisez & Joseph M. Boyle (1983). The Way of the Lord Jesus.
     
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  34. Mary Boyle (2011). Making the World Go Away, and How Psychology and Psychiatry Benefit. In Joanna Moncrieff, Mark Rapley & Jacqui Dillon (eds.), De-Medicalizing Misery: Psychiatry, Psychology and the Human Condition. Palgrave Macmillan
     
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  35. Robert Boyle (1999). A Free Enquiry Into the Vulgarly Received Notion of Nature. Dialogue 38 (4):894-895.
     
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  36.  7
    Eric C. Jones, Albert J. Faas, Arthur D. Murphy, Graham A. Tobin, Linda M. Whiteford & Christopher McCarty (2013). Cross-Cultural and Site-Based Influences on Demographic, Well-Being, and Social Network Predictors of Risk Perception in Hazard and Disaster Settings in Ecuador and Mexico. Human Nature 24 (1):5-32.
    Although virtually all comparative research about risk perception focuses on which hazards are of concern to people in different culture groups, much can be gained by focusing on predictors of levels of risk perception in various countries and places. In this case, we examine standard and novel predictors of risk perception in seven sites among communities affected by a flood in Mexico (one site) and volcanic eruptions in Mexico (one site) and Ecuador (five sites). We conducted more than 450 interviews (...)
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  37.  17
    Mary-Ellen Boyle (2007). Learning to Neighbor? Service-Learning in Context. Journal of Academic Ethics 5 (1):85-104.
    Service-learning has received a great deal of attention in the management education literature over the past decade, as a method by which students can acquire moral and civic values as well as gain academic knowledge and practice real-world skills. Scholars focus on student and community impact, curricular design, and rationale. However, the educational environment (“context”) in which service-learning occurs has been given less attention, although experienced educators know that the classroom is hardly a vacuum and that students learn a great (...)
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  38.  5
    Bart Collopy, Philip Boyle & Bruce Jennings (1991). New Directions in Nursing Home Ethics. Hastings Center Report 21 (2):1-16.
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  39. Leonard E. Boyle (2002). The Setting of the Summa Theologiae of St. Thomas-Revisited. In Stephen J. Pope (ed.), The Ethics of Aquinas. 1--16.
     
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  40.  7
    Brendan Boyle (2012). Foucault Among the Classicists, Again. Foucault Studies 13:138-156.
    Foucault’s posthumously-published late work on epimeleia heautou might inaugurate a new partnership between classicists and Foucault. This work, however, has been misconstrued in recent classical scholarship, an important instance of which I consider here. I remedy the errors of one of Foucault’s classical interpreters; diagnose the reasons for the errors; and briefly suggest the transformative potential of Foucault’s work for students of antiquity.
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  41. John Finnis, Germain Grisez & Joseph Boyle (2001). «Direct» and «Indirect»: A Reply to Critics of Our Action Theory. The Thomist 65 (1):1-44.
     
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  42.  6
    R. J. Boyle (2004). Ethics of Refusing Parental Requests to Withhold or Withdraw Treatment From Their Premature Baby. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (4):402-405.
    In the United Kingdom women have access to termination of pregnancy for maternal reasons until 24 weeks’ completed gestation, but it is accepted practice for children born at or beyond 25 weeks’ gestation to be treated according to the child’s perceived best interests even if this is not in accordance with parental wishes. The authors present a case drawn from clinical practice which highlights the discomfort that parents may feel about such an abrupt change in their rights over their child, (...)
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  43. Leonard E. Boyle (2008). The Setting of the Summa Theologiae of Saint Thomas (1982). In James P. Reilly (ed.), The Gilson Lectures on Thomas Aquinas. Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies
     
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  44.  22
    Brendan Boyle (2011). The Bildungsroman After McDowell: Mind, World, and Moral Education. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (2):173-184.
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  45.  4
    Mathew Boyle (2007). The Relational Principle of Trust and Confidence. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 27 (4):633-657.
    This article seeks to explain why, in terms of Iain Macneil's relational theory of contract, the implied mutual duty of trust and confidence can be described as a quintessentially relational norm. The role played by the duty in the development of a relational approach to variation of the employment contract is examined. The potential for the trust duty to become a relational principle informing the content of the employment contract is explored. The impact of litigation based on the trust duty (...)
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  46.  36
    Kirk Boyle (2009). Reading the Dialectical Ontology of The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou Against the Ontological Monism of Adaptation. Film-Philosophy 11 (1):1-32.
    ‘Postmodern’ is a concept now deposited in the word banks of both highbrow cinephilesand lowbrow arbiters of popular filmic taste. How these two groups of critics deploy theterm, however, widely differs. Critiquing Wes Anderson’s The Life Aquatic with SteveZissou , for instance, Entertainment Weekly’s Owen Glieberman writes: ‘Once again,[Anderson] creates a hermetic, glassed-in movie world of postmodern anachronisms thatcharms and distances in equal measure’ . Characteristic of most reviewers of LifeAquatic, Glieberman uses ‘postmodern’ in a purely aesthetic sense. Although this (...)
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  47.  2
    Dana Snelling, D. Walter Rasugu Omariba, Sungjin Hong, Katholiki Georgiades, Yvonne Racine & Michael H. Boyle (2007). Hiv/Aids Knowledge, Women’s Education, Epidemic Severity and Protective Sexual Behaviour in Low- and Middle-Income Countries. Journal of Biosocial Science 39 (3):421.
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  48.  6
    Brett A. Boyle, Robert F. Dahlstrom & James J. Kellaris (1998). Points of Reference and Individual Differences as Sources of Bias in Ethical Judgments. Journal of Business Ethics 17 (5):63-71.
    The authors demonstrate that ethical judgments can be biased when previous judgments serve as a point of reference against which a current situation is judged. Scenarios describing ethical or unethical sales practices were used in an experiment to prime subjects who subsequently rated the ethics of an ethically ambiguous target scenario. The target tended to be rated as more ethical by subjects primed with unethical scenarios, and less ethical by subjects primed with ethical scenarios. This "contrast effect," however, is contingent (...)
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  49.  34
    Robert R. Boyle (1954). The Nature of Metaphor. Modern Schoolman 31 (4):257-280.
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  50.  8
    Cam Caldwell & Mary-Ellen Boyle (2007). Academia, Aristotle, and the Public Sphere – Stewardship Challenges to Schools of Business. Journal of Academic Ethics 5 (1):5-20.
    In this paper we suggest that the ethical duties of business schools can be understood as representing stewardship in the Aristotelian tradition. In Introduction section we briefly explain the nature of ethical stewardship as a moral guideline for organizations in examining their duties to society. Ethical Stewardship section presents six ethical duties of business schools that are owed to four distinct stakeholders, and includes examples of each of those duties. Utilizing this Framework section identifies how this framework of duties can (...)
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