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Whitney Bauman [6]Whitney A. Bauman [4]
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  1.  30
    Whitney Bauman (2015). Religion, Science, and Globalization: Beyond Comparative Approaches. Zygon 50 (2):389-402.
    Using case studies from the Indonesian context, this article argues that the current truth regimes we now live by are always and already “hybrid” and that we need new methods for understanding meaning-making practices in an era of globalization and climate change than comparative approaches allow. Following the works of such thinkers as physicist Karen Barad, political philosopher William Connolly, and eco-critic Timothy Morton, this article develops the idea that an event-oriented or object-oriented approach better captures our hybrid meaning-making practices. (...)
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  2. Whitney A. Bauman (2014). Religion and Ecology: Developing a Planetary Ethic. Columbia University Press.
    Moving beyond identity politics while continuing to respect diverse entities and concerns, Whitney A. Bauman builds a planetary politics that better responds to the realities of a pluralistic world. Calling attention to the historical, political, and ecological influences shaping our understanding of nature, religion, humanity, and identity, Bauman collapses the boundaries separating male from female, biology from machine, human from more than human, and religion from science, encouraging readers to embrace hybridity and the inherent fluctuations of an open, evolving global (...)
     
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  3.  72
    Whitney Bauman (2011). Religion, Science, and Nature: Shifts in Meaning on a Changing Planet. Zygon 46 (4):777-792.
    Abstract This article explores how religion and science, as worlding practices, are changed by the processes of globalization and global climate change. In the face of these processes, two primary methods of meaning making are emerging: the logic of globalization and planetary assemblages. The former operates out of the same logic as extant axial age religions, the Enlightenment, and Modernity. It is caught up in the process of universalizing meanings, objective truth, and a single reality. The latter suggests that the (...)
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  4.  30
    Whitney Bauman (2009). Theology, Creation, and Environmental Ethics: From Creatio Ex Nihilo to Terra Nullius. Routledge.
    Introduction : points of departure -- A genealogy of the Christian colonial mindset : ex nihilo from disputed beginnings to orthodox origins -- Ex nihilo and the origin of an empire -- Ex nihilo, erasure and discovery? -- The cogito, ex nihilo, and the legacy of John Locke -- The creation ex nihilo of terra nullius lands : omnipotent nations and the logic of global-colonization -- From epistemologies of domination to grounded thinking -- Opening words about God onto creatio continua (...)
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  5.  27
    Whitney A. Bauman (2007). The Eco-Ontology of Social/Ist Ecofeminist Thought. Environmental Ethics 29 (3):279-298.
    The epistemological and ontological claims of social/ist ecofeminist thought (a combination of social and socialist ecofeminism) are moving away from the dichotomy between idealism and materialism (both forms of colonial thinking about humans and the rest of the natural world). The social/ist ecofeminists have constructed a postfoundational “eco-ontology” of nature-cultures (Haraway) in which the ideal and the material are co-agents in the continuing process of creation. Given that contemporary public discourse in the United States on the topic of “environmental issues” (...)
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  6.  5
    Whitney A. Bauman (2011). Theological Foundations for Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 33 (3):331-333.
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  7. Whitney Bauman (2007). Creatio Ex Nihilo, Terra Nullius, and the Erasure of Presence. In Laurel Kearns & Catherine Keller (eds.), Ecospirit: Religions and Philosophies for the Earth. Fordham University Press 353--372.
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  8. Whitney A. Bauman (2016). How Forests Think: Toward an Anthropology Beyond the Human. Philosophy, Theology and the Sciences 3 (2):258-262.
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  9. Emily Leah Silverman, Dirk von der Horst & Whitney Bauman (2014). Voices of Feminist Liberation. Routledge.
    'Voices of Feminist Liberation' brings together a wide range of scholars to explore the work of Rosemary Radford Ruether, one of the most influential feminist and liberation theologians of our time. Ruether's extraordinary and ground-breaking thinking has shaped debates across liberation theology, feminism and eco-feminism, queer theology, social justice and inter-religious dialogue. At the same time, her commitment to practice and agency has influenced sites of local resistance around the world as well as on globalised strategies for ecological sustainability and (...)
     
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  10. Emily Leah Silverman, Dirk von der Horst & Whitney Bauman (2014). Voices of Feminist Liberation. Routledge.
    'Voices of Feminist Liberation' brings together a wide range of scholars to explore the work of Rosemary Radford Ruether, one of the most influential feminist and liberation theologians of our time. Ruether's extraordinary and ground-breaking thinking has shaped debates across liberation theology, feminism and eco-feminism, queer theology, social justice and inter-religious dialogue. At the same time, her commitment to practice and agency has influenced sites of local resistance around the world as well as on globalised strategies for ecological sustainability and (...)
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