Search results for 'Whiton S. Paine' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. T. T. Paine & J. S. (1962). Paternity and Predicamental Relations. Heythrop Journal 3 (3):248–261.score: 2400.0
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  2. Whiton S. Paine & Mary Lou Galantino (2007). Biomarketing Ethics, Functional Foods, Health, and Minors. Journal of Philosophical Research 32 (Supplement):163-176.score: 870.0
    In the next few years, biotechnology will continue to develop a wide variety of functional foods, foods whose benefits go well beyond basic nutrition. Minors are a major potential market for bioengineered foods that are promoted not as sustaining health but rather as supporting desired lifestyles through the enhancement of physical, athletic, intellectual, or social performance. The experience of other industries suggests that such biomarketing is likely to create a variety of highly public ethical controversies. After a discussion of some (...)
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  3. Thomas Paine (2010). Writings of Thomas Paine: A Collection of Pamphlets From America's Most Radical Founding Father. Red and Black Publishers.score: 780.0
    Common sense -- African slavery in America -- An occasional letter on the female sex -- Agrarian justice -- The rights of man -- The age of reason.
     
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  4. Thomas Paine (1987). Thomas Paine Reader. Penguin Books.score: 480.0
    Presents selections from Paine's political writings, including "Common Sense," "The Rights of Man," "The American Crisis," and "The Age of Reason".
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  5. Thomas Paine (1940/2008). The Essential Thomas Paine. Dover Publications, Inc..score: 480.0
    The impassioned democratic voice of the Age of Revolution, Paine possessed a gift for stating complex ideas in concise language. This accessible collection of highlights from the social and political philosopher's best-known works includes lengthy selections from Common Sense , The American Crisis , The Rights of Man , and The Age of Reason.
     
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  6. Thomas Paine (1792/1999). Rights of Man. Dover Publications.score: 300.0
    One of Paine’s greatest and most widely read works, considered a classic statement of faith in democracy and egalitarianism, defends the early events of the French Revolution, supports social security for workers, public employment for those in need of work, abolition of laws limiting wages, and other social reforms. An inspiring book that paved the way for the growth and development of democratic traditions in American and British society.
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  7. Thomas Paine (2003). Common Sense and Other Writings. Modern Library.score: 300.0
    Includes the complete texts of Common Sense; Rights of Man, Part the Second; The Age of Reason (part one); Four Letters on Interesting Subjects , published anonymously and just discovered to be Paine’s work; and Letter to the Abbé Raynal, Paine’s first examination of world events; as well as selections from The American Crises In 1776, America was a hotbed of enlightenment and revolution. Thomas Paine not only spurred his fellow Americans to action but soon came to (...)
     
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  8. Thomas Paine (2011). The Age of Reason. Broadview Press.score: 300.0
    The Age of Reason is one of the most influential defences of Deism (the idea that God can be known without organized religion) ever written. This edition presents Part 1, Paine's controversial philosophical argument against revealed religion, with representative excerpts of his biblical analysis from Parts 2 and 3. Appendices include numerous selections from Paine's other religious writing, his Deist influences, and his contemporary opposition.
     
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  9. Randall Paine (1989). "G. K. Chesterton: Philosopher Without Portfolio," by Quentin Lauer, S.J. The Chesterton Review 15 (3):370-376.score: 240.0
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  10. Thomas Paine (1937/2008). Rights of Man: Being an Answer to Mr. Burke's Attack on the French Revolution. Watts.score: 240.0
  11. Lynn Sharp Paine (2006). The Corporation's Evolving Personality. In Xiaohe Lu & Georges Enderle (eds.), Developing Business Ethics in China. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 240.0
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  12. Lynn Sharp Paine (1991). Corporate Policy and the Ethics of Competitor Intelligence Gathering. Journal of Business Ethics 10 (6):423 - 436.score: 120.0
    Competitor intelligence, information that helps managers understand their competitors, is highly valued in today's marketplace. Firms, large and small, are taking a more systematic approach to competitor intelligence collection. At the same time, information crimes and litigation over information disputes appear to be on the rise, and survey data show widespread approval of unethical and questionable intelligence-gathering methods. Despite these developments, few corporations address the ethics of intelligence gathering in their corporate codes of conduct. Neither managers nor management educators have (...)
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  13. Samuel M. Brown, C. Gregory Elliott & Robert Paine (2013). Withdrawal of Nonfutile Life Support After Attempted Suicide. American Journal of Bioethics: 13 (3):3 - 12.score: 120.0
    End-of-life decision making is fraught with ethical challenges. Withholding or withdrawing life support therapy is widely considered ethical in patients with high treatment burden, poor premorbid status, or significant projected disability even when such treatment is not ?futile.? Whether such withdrawal of therapy in the aftermath of attempted suicide is ethical is not well established in the literature. We provide a clinical vignette and propose criteria under which such withdrawal would be ethical. We suggest that it is appropriate to withdraw (...)
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  14. Lynn Sharp Paine (2000). Does Ethics Pay? Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (1):319-330.score: 120.0
    The relationship between ethics and economics has never been easy. Opponents in a tug of war, friends in a warm embrace, ships passing in the night—the relationship has been highly variable. In recent years, the friendship model has been gaining credence, particularly among U.S. corporate executives. Increasingly, companies are launching ethics programs, values initiatives, and community involvement activities premised on management’s belief that “Ethics pays.”.
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  15. W. S., H. A. & E. Kemmann (1998). Discussion. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 29 (4):639-652.score: 100.0
    Objective: To review the principles and practice of the use of conscious sedation for IVF.Design: The pertinent literature was reviewed and recommendations are provided.Result(s): Conscious sedation appears to be the most commonly used method of pain relief for transvaginal retrieval of oocytes. Conscious sedation does not require the presence of an anesthesiologist and can be done in freestanding clinics. Agents commonly used include opioids in combination with benzodiazepines. This combination minimizes pain, decreases anxiety, and provides sedation and some amnesia Adjuvants (...)
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  16. Sean Wilentz (2009). Paine's Legacy. In Joyce Chumbley (ed.), Thomas Paine: In Search of the Common Good. Spokesman Books.score: 78.0
     
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  17. Mark Philp (1993). The Role of America in the 'Debate on France' 1791–5: Thomas Paine's Insertion. Utilitas 5 (02):221-.score: 72.0
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  18. Harold P. Cooke (1913). Primus Annus Primus Annus. By W. L. Paine and C. L. Mainwaring (Whitgift School, Croydon). With an Introduction by S. O. Andrew. Pp. 138. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1912. 2s. Decem Fabulae. By W. L. Paine, C. L. Mainwaring, and Miss E. Ryle. With a Preface by W. H. D. Rouse. Pp. 94. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1912. 1s. 6d. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 27 (01):32-33.score: 72.0
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  19. Christopher Hitchens (2006/2007). Thomas Paine's Rights of Man. Atlantic Monthly Press.score: 72.0
     
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  20. Gary Kates (forthcoming). From Liberalism to Radicalism: Tom Paine's Rights of Man. Journal of the History of Ideas.score: 72.0
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  21. Louise Marcil-Lacoste (1990). Paine's Revolutionary Common Sense. Social Philosophy Today 3:171-194.score: 72.0
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  22. Strauss Arendt (2010). In Wokler and Goldie (Eds) The Cambridge History of Eighteenth Century Political Thought (2006);'On Not Inventing the British Revolution', in Glenn Burgess (Ed.) English Radicalism, 1550–1850 (CUP) and 'Did Paine Abridge His Rights of Man?', Enlightenment and Dissent (2007). He is Currently Preparing Burke's Post-Revolutionary Writings for CUP. [REVIEW] European Journal of Political Theory 9 (3):243-244.score: 72.0
  23. Joseph Priestley (1794/1977). A Continuation of the Letters to the Philosophers and Politicians of France on the Subject of Religion, and of the Letters to a Philosophical Unbeliever in Answer to Mr. Paine's Age of Reason. Kraus Reprint Co..score: 72.0
     
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  24. Thomas Dewitt Scoble (1946). Thomas Paine's Citizenship Record. New Rochelle, N.Y.,Thomas Paine National Historical Assn..score: 72.0
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  25. R. L. Barnette (1977). Kripke's Pains. Southern Journal of Philosophy 15 (1):3-14.score: 44.0
  26. Eric Foner (2005). Tom Paine and Revolutionary America. Oxford University Press.score: 42.0
    Since its publication in 1976, Tom Paine and Revolutionary America has been recognized as a classic study of the career of the foremost political pamphleteer of the Age of Revolution, and a model of how to integrate the political, intellectual, and social history of the struggle for American independence. Foner skillfully brings together an account of Paine's remarkable career with a careful examination of the social worlds within which he operated, in Great Britain, France, and especially the United (...)
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  27. Edward Larkin (2005). Thomas Paine and the Literature of Revolution. Cambridge University Press.score: 42.0
    Although the impact of works such as Common Sense and The Rights of Man has led historians to study Thomas Paine's role in the American Revolution and political scientists to evaluate his contributions to political theory, scholars have tacitly agreed not to treat him as a literary figure. This book not only redresses this omission, but also demonstrates that Paine's literary sensibility is particularly evident in the very texts that confirmed his importance as a theorist. And yet, because (...)
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  28. Vikki J. Vickers (2006). "My Pen and My Soul Have Ever Gone Together": Thomas Paine and the American Revolution. Routledge.score: 42.0
    It is the study of how Thomas Paine's religious beliefs shaped his political ideology and influenced his political activism.
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  29. Paul Collins (2005). The Trouble with Tom: The Strange Afterlife and Times of Thomas Paine. Distributed to the Trade by Holtzbrinck Publishers.score: 42.0
    Paul Collins travels the globe piecing together the missing body and soul of one of our most enigmatic founding fathers: Thomas Paine. A typical book about an American founding father doesn’t start at a gay piano bar and end in a sewage ditch. But then, Tom Paine isn’t your typical founding father. A firebrand rebel and a radical on the run, Paine alone claims a key role in the development of three modern democracies. In death, his story (...)
     
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  30. Foot (ed.) (1997). Thomas Paine: Life and Works. Routledge.score: 42.0
    Thomas Paine was a hugely influential revolutionary pamphleteer, whose writings were instrumental in bringing about some of the greatest political changes the world has seen. Paine's enduring importance lies not so much in the depth of his political philosophy as in his great abilities as a communicator of political ideas. Conway's Writings was the first complete critical collection of Paine's works, and his Life was the first account to show Paine in a positive light.
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  31. Harvey J. Kaye (2005). Thomas Paine and the Promise of America. Hill and Wang.score: 42.0
    America’s unfinished revolution The_revolutionary spirit that runs through American history and whose_founding_father and greatest advocate was Thomas Paine is fiercely traced in Thomas Paine and the Promise of America ._Showing how Paine turned Americans into radicals—and how we have remained radicals at heart ever since—Harvey J. Kaye presents the nation’s democratic story with wit, subtlety, and, above all, passion. Paine was one of the most remarkable political writers of the modern world and the greatest radical of (...)
     
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  32. Daniel S. Goldberg (2009). Exilic Effects of Illness and Pain in Solzhenitsyn's Cancer Ward: How Sharpening the Moral Imagination Can Facilitate Repatriation. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 30 (1):29-42.score: 38.0
    This essay uses Solzhenitsyn’s Cancer Ward to explore the exilic effects of illness and pain. The novel is uniquely suited for such an analysis given the theme of exile that predominates both in the narrative and in the composition of multiple characters within that narrative. I argue that illness, and in particular pain, is a liminal state, an existential hinterlands. The ethical approach to literature and medicine may suggest, as a response to these exilic effects, the need to cultivate connection (...)
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  33. Frédérique de Vignemont & Pierre Jacob (2012). What Is It Like to Feel Another's Pain? Philosophy of Science 79 (2):295-316.score: 36.0
    We offer an account of empathetic pain that preserves the distinctions among standard pain, contagious pain, empathetic pain, sympathy for pain, and standard pain ascription. Vicarious experiences of both contagious and empathetic pain resemble to some extent experiences of standard pain. But there are also crucial dissimilarities. As neuroscientific results show, standard pain involves a sensorimotor and an affective component. According to our account, contagious pain consists in imagining the former, whereas empathetic pain consists in imagining the latter. We further (...)
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  34. Adam Swenson (2009). Pain's Evils. Utilitas 21 (2):197-216.score: 36.0
    The traditional accounts of pain’s intrinsic badness assume a false view of what pains are. Insofar as they are normatively significant, pains are not just painful sensations. A pain is a composite of a painful sensation and a set of beliefs, desires, emotions, and other mental states. A pain’s intrinsic properties can include inter alia depression, anxiety, fear, desires, feelings of helplessness, and the pain’s meaning. This undermines the traditional accounts of pain’s intrinsic badness. Pain is intrinsically bad in two (...)
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  35. David Robjant (2012). Learning of Pains; Wittgenstein's Own Cartesian Mistake at Investigations 246. Wittgenstein Studien 2012 3 (2012):261-285.score: 36.0
    I consider the support variously offered for the remark at Philosophical Investigations 246: ‘It can’t be said of me at all (except perhaps as a joke) that I know I am in pain.’ Against the first sort of argument to be found in Wittgenstein and the literature I offer cases in which I learn of pain. Against the second sort of argument I develop the case in which I am persuaded by compelling evidence that I am, contrary to what I (...)
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  36. William R. Carter (1972). Locke on Feeling Another's Pain. Philosophical Studies 23 (June):280-285.score: 32.0
  37. Mary Sirridge (2005). Dream Bodies and Dream Pains in Augustine's "de Natura Et Origine Animae". Vivarium 43 (2):213-249.score: 32.0
    In his De Natura et Origine Animae, an answer to a work by Vincentius Victor, Augustine was drawn into attempting to answer some questions about what kind of reality dream-bodies, dream-worlds and dream-pains have. In this paper I concentrate on Augustine's attempts to show that none of Victor's arguments for the corporeality of the soul are any good, and that Victor's inflated claims about the extent of the soul's self-knowledge are the result of mistaking self-awareness for self-knowledge. Augustine takes the (...)
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  38. George Graham & G. Lynn Stephens (1987). Minding Your P's and Q's: Pain and Sensible Qualities. Noûs 21 (September):395-405.score: 32.0
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  39. John Michael & Francesca Fardo (forthcoming). What (If Anything) Is Shared in Pain Empathy? A Critical Discussion of De Vignemont and Jacob's Theory of the Neural Substrate of Pain Empathy. .score: 32.0
    In a recent article in Philosophy of Science, De Vignemont and Jacob defend the view that empathy involves interpersonal similarity between an empathizer and a target person with respect to internal affective states. Focusing on empathy for pain, they propose a theory of the neural substrate of pain empathy. We point out several flaws in their interpretation of the data and argue that currently available data do not differentiate between De Vignemont and Jacob’s model and alternative models. Finally, we offer (...)
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  40. Devon E. Hinton (2012). Pain's Description: Beginning Grammar and Biological Philology. Emotion Review 4 (3):322-323.score: 32.0
    How can pain complaints be elicited and analyzed so as to increase the empathic bond between patient and clinician? I will argue that though Wierzbicka’s approach to this question is useful—an exploration of certain abstract dimensions of pain’s meaning—it fails to examine key aspects that are the most useful and crucial for cultural analysis and for building empathic bonds between the clinician and patient. Not just a grammar of pain is needed; rather a biological philology of pain.
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  41. Joshua Seachris & Linda Zagzebski (2007). Weighing Evils: The C. S. Lewis Approach. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 62 (2):81 - 88.score: 30.0
    It is often argued that the great quantity of evil in our world makes God’s existence less likely than a lesser quantity would, and this, presumably, because the probability that some evils are gratuitous increases as the overall quantity of evil increases. Often, an additive approach to quantifying evil is employed in such arguments. In this paper, we examine C. S. Lewis’ objection to the additive approach, arguing that although he is correct to reject this approach, there is a sense (...)
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  42. Donald F. Gustafson (2000). Our Choice Between Actual and Remembered Pain and Our Flawed Preferences. Philosophical Psychology 13 (1):111-119.score: 30.0
    In Stephanie Beardman's discussion of the empirical results of Kahneman and Tversky and Kahneman, et al. on pain preference and rational utility decision she argues that an interpretation of these results does not require that false memory for pain episodes yields irrational preferences for future pain events. I concur with her conclusion and suggest that there are reasons from within the pain sciences for agreeing with Beardman's reinterpretation of the Kahneman, et al. data. I cite some of these theoretical and (...)
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  43. Michel Denuit, Claude Lefèvre & Marco Scarsini (2001). On S-Convexity and Risk Aversion. Theory and Decision 50 (3):239-248.score: 30.0
    The present note first discusses the concept of s-convex pain functions in decision theory. Then, the economic behavior of an agent with such a pain function is represented through the comparison of some recursive lotteries.
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  44. S. Benjamin Fink (2010). Review of Victoria Braithwaite's „Do Fish Feel Pain?“. [REVIEW] Metapsychology 14 (34).score: 30.0
  45. T. L. S. Sprigge (2004). A History of Philosophy in America 1720–2000 by Bruce Kuklick, Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2001. Philosophy 79 (2):348-350.score: 30.0
    Ranging from Joseph Bellamy to Hilary Putnam, and from early New England Divinity Schools to contemporary university philosophy departments, historian Bruce Kuklick recounts the story of the growth of philosophical thinking in the United States. Readers will explore the thought of early American philosphers such as Jonathan Edwards and John Witherspoon and will see how the political ideas of Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Paine and Thomas Jefferson influenced philosophy in colonial America. Kuklick discusses The Transcendental Club (members Henry David Thoreau, (...)
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  46. Peter S. Fosl (1999). Hume, Skepticism, and Early American Deism. Hume Studies 25 (1/2):171-192.score: 30.0
    This article first builds upon precedent work--including that of John M. Werner, Kerry S. Walters, and James Dye-to articulate a more complete understanding of David Hume's influence upon North American colonial and early U.S. thought. Secondly, through a comparison with arguments concerning miracles developed by early American deists Elihu Palmer, Ethan Allen, and Thomas Paine, the article clarifies and evaluates Hume's arguments against the rationality of belief in miracles. It judges Hume's arguments to be superior. Thirdly, the article uses (...)
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  47. Juan Rodríguez Larreta (2005). Conceiving of Someone Else's Pain on the Model of One's Own. Análisis Filosófico 25 (1):63-70.score: 30.0
    En What Emotions Really Are y en otros artículos, Griffiths afirma que las clases naturales de los organismos vivos en Biología son cladistas. La afirmación está inmersa en una nueva teoría acerca de las clases naturales. En este trabajo examinaré los argumentos esgrimidos por Griffiths para sostener el estatus privilegiado de las clasificaciones cladistas frente a otras clasificaciones. No se discutirá la teoría de las clases naturales ofrecida, de cuyos méritos no dudo, sino su capacidad para ofrecer una solución en (...)
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  48. Cheryl K. Chen (2005). Comments on Juan Rodríguez Larreta's Paper: "Conceiving of Someone Else's Pain on the Model of One's Own". Análisis Filosófico 25 (1):81-85.score: 30.0
    En What Emotions Really Are y en otros artículos, Griffiths afirma que las clases naturales de los organismos vivos en Biología son cladistas. La afirmación está inmersa en una nueva teoría acerca de las clases naturales. En este trabajo examinaré los argumentos esgrimidos por Griffiths para sostener el estatus privilegiado de las clasificaciones cladistas frente a otras clasificaciones. No se discutirá la teoría de las clases naturales ofrecida, de cuyos méritos no dudo, sino su capacidad para ofrecer una solución en (...)
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  49. Esther Cohen (2012). Reflections on the Diminishing of the Other's Pain. In , Knowledge and Pain. Rodopi. 84--25.score: 30.0
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  50. S. Benjamin Fink (2010). Review of Arne Vetlesen's „The Philosophy of Pain“. [REVIEW] Metapsychology 14 (25).score: 30.0
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