Search results for 'Whole' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  37
    Ronald P. Endicott (forthcoming). Developing The Explanatory Dimensions of Part-Whole Realization. Philosophical Studies.
    I use Carl Gillett's much heralded dimensioned theory of realization as a platform to develop a plausible part-whole theory. I begin with some basic desiderata for a theory of realization that its key terms should be defined and that it should be explanatory. I then argue that Gillett's original theory violates these conditions because its explanatory force rests upon an unspecified "in virtue of" relation. I then examine Gillett's later version that appeals instead to theoretical terms tied to "mechanisms." (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  92
    Andreas Hüttemann (forthcoming). Physicalism and the Part-Whole Relation. In Christian Wüthrich & Tomasz Bigaj (eds.), Metaphysics in Contemporary Physics.
    In this paper I intend to analyse whether a certain kind of physicalism (part-wholephysicalism)is supported by what classical mechanics and quantum mechanics have to say about the part whole relation. I will argue that not even the most likely candidates – namely cases of microexplanation of the dynamics of compound systems – provide evidence for part whole-physicalism, i.e. the thesis that the behaviour of the compound obtains in virtue of the behaviour of the parts. Physics does not dictate (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Fred Feldman (2008). Whole Life Satisfaction Concepts of Happiness. Theoria 74 (3):219-238.
    The most popular concepts of happiness among psychologists and philosophers nowadays are concepts of happiness according to which happiness is defined as " satisfaction with life as a whole ". Such concepts are " Whole Life Satisfaction " concepts of happiness. I show that there are hundreds of non-equivalent ways in which a WLS conception of happiness can be developed. However, every precise conception either requires actual satisfaction with life as a whole or requires hypothetical satisfaction with (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  4.  53
    Jussi Suikkanen (2011). An Improved Whole Life Satisfaction Theory of Happiness. International Journal of Wellbeing 1 (1):149-166.
    According to the popular Whole Life Satisfaction theories of happiness, an agent is happy when she judges that her life fulfils her ideal life-plan. Fred Feldman has recently argued that such views cannot accommodate the happiness of spontaneous or pre-occupied agents who do not consider how well their lives are going. In this paper, I formulate a new Whole Life Satisfaction theory which can deal with this problem. My proposal is inspired by Michael Smith’s advice-model of desirability. According (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  9
    Josée Johnston & Michelle Szabo (2011). Reflexivity and the Whole Foods Market Consumer: The Lived Experience of Shopping for Change. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 28 (3):303-319.
    There has been widespread academic and popular debate about the transformative potential of consumption choices, particularly food shopping. While popular food media is optimistic about “shopping for change,” food scholars are more critical, drawing attention to fetishist approaches to “local” or “organic,” and suggesting the need for reflexive engagement with food politics. We argue that reflexivity is central to understanding the potential and limitations of consumer-focused food politics, but argue that this concept is often relatively unspecified. The first objective of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  6.  21
    Alexandra Arapinis (2015). Whole-for-Part Metonymy, Classification, and Grounding. Linguistics and Philosophy 38 (1):1-29.
    Since the early 1980s, metonymy has progressively gained central stage in linguistic investigations. The advent of cognitive linguistics marked a new turn in the study of this trope conceived, not as a deviation from semantic conventions, but as a phenomenon rooted in non-language-specific mechanisms of conceptualization of the world. Acknowledging that metonymy is ultimately cognitive in nature, this paper proposes to consider metonymy from its multiple levels of manifestation, integrating cognitive, pragmatic, semantic, but also ontological angles of approach. Taking (...)-for-part metonymies as a case study, I aim to show how recent developments within these respective disciplines can enrich our understanding of such metonymic mechanisms, sometimes without even identifying them as such. This paper proposes to establish a dialog between these disciplines on the topic of WP-metonymy. So, after a presentation of the most standard cognitive and pragmatic approaches to WP-metonymy, I will argue for the relevance of recent semantic investigations on quantity gradability, and for the theoretical importance of keeping these two kinds of part-reference clearly apart. I will show that the literature on gradability provides strong semantic arguments for doing so. Finally, connecting the debate on WP-metonymy with the ontological debate on property inherence will open the way for a formal treatment of WP-metonymy within ground logic. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  25
    Galen Wright, Pieter Koornhof, Adebowale Adeyemo & Nicki Tiffin (2013). Ethical and Legal Implications of Whole Genome and Whole Exome Sequencing in African Populations. BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):21.
    Rapid advances in high throughput genomic technologies and next generation sequencing are making medical genomic research more readily accessible and affordable, including the sequencing of patient and control whole genomes and exomes in order to elucidate genetic factors underlying disease. Over the next five years, the Human Heredity and Health in Africa (H3Africa) Initiative, funded by the Wellcome Trust (United Kingdom) and the National Institutes of Health (United States of America), will contribute greatly towards sequencing of numerous African samples (...)
    Direct download (16 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8.  64
    John L. Bell (2004). Whole and Part in Mathematics. Axiomathes 14 (4):285-294.
    The centrality of the whole/part relation in mathematics is demonstrated through the presentation and analysis of examples from algebra, geometry, functional analysis,logic, topology and category theory.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  9.  69
    Friederike Moltmann (2005). Part Structures in Situations: The Semantics of 'Individual' and 'Whole'. Linguistics and Philosophy 28 (5):599 - 641.
    This paper develops the notion of a situated part structure and applies it to the semantics of the modifiers 'whole' and 'individual'. It argues that the ambiguity of 'whole' should be traced to two different conceptions of part structures of objects being at play: one according to which the parts of an objects are just the material parts and another, Aristotelian conception according to which the parts of an object include properties of form.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  10.  37
    Robert Mayhew (1997). Part and Whole in Aristotle's Political Philosophy. Journal of Ethics 1 (4):325-340.
    It is often held that according to Aristotle the city is a natural organism. One major reason for this organic interpretation is no doubt that Aristotle describes the relationship between the individual and the city as a part-whole relationship, seemingly the same relationship that holds between the parts of a natural organism and the organism itself. Moreover, some scholars (most notably Jonathan Barnes) believe this view of the city led Aristotle to accept an implicit totalitarianism. I argue, however, that (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  27
    Corey Anton (2006). Dreamless Sleep and the Whole of Human Life: An Ontological Exposition. [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (2):181 - 202.
    This paper explores the meaning of dreamless sleep. First, I consider four reasons why we commonly pass over sleep's ontological significance. Second, I compare and contrast death and sleep to show how each is oriented to questions regarding the possibilities of "being-a-whole." In the third and final part, I explore the meaning and implications of "being-toward-sleep," arguing that human existence emerges atop naturally anonymous corporeality (i.e. living being). In sum, I try to show that we can recover an authentic (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  4
    Jan Helge Solbakk (forthcoming). The Whole and the Art of Medical Dialectic: A Platonic Account. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy:1-14.
    The aim of this paper is to investigate Plato’s conception of the whole in the Phaedrus and the theory of medical dialectic underlying this conception. Through this analysis Plato’s conception of kairos will also be adressed. It will be argued that the epistemological holism developed in the dialogue and the patient-typology emerging from it provides us with a way of perceiving individual situations of medical discourse and decision-making that makes it possible to bridge the gap between observations of a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. R. K. Mishra (2011). The Whole Being: A Journey Towards Harmony and Happiness. Rupa Publications India in Association with Brahma Vidya Kendra.
    Section 1. Prologue -- section 2. The whole being -- section 3. Engaging with wholeness -- section 4. Wholeness in Kashmiri Shaivism -- section 5. The Buddhist perspective -- section 6. Wholeness in the modern world -- section 7. The workings of wholeness in our world -- section 8. Epilogue.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Jonathan Schaffer (2010). Monism: The Priority of the Whole. Philosophical Review 119 (1):31-76.
    Consider a circle and a pair of its semicircles. Which is prior, the whole or its parts? Are the semicircles dependent abstractions from their whole, or is the circle a derivative construction from its parts? Now in place of the circle consider the entire cosmos (the ultimate concrete whole), and in place of the pair of semicircles consider the myriad particles (the ultimate concrete parts). Which if either is ultimately prior, the one ultimate whole or its (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   137 citations  
  15.  26
    Friederike Moltmann (forthcoming). Partial Content and Expressions of Part and Whole. Discussion of Stephen Yablo: Aboutness. Philosophical Studies.
    In 'Aboutness' (MIT Press 2014), Yablo argues for the notion of partial content and partial truth. This paper provides a range of linguistic support for those notions and argues that they or their extensions are involved in a much greater range of entities than acknowledged by Yablo.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Andreas Hüttemann, Reimer Kühn & Orestis Terzidis (2015). Stability, Emergence and Part-Whole-Reduction. In Brigitte Falkenburg & Margret Morrison (eds.), Why More Is Different. Philosophical Issues in Condensed Matter Physics and Complex Systems. Springer 169-200.
    We address the question whether there is an explanation for the fact that as Fodor put it the micro-level “converges on stable macro-level properties”, and whether there are lessons from this explanation for other issues in the vicinity. We argue that stability in large systems can be understood in terms of statistical limit theorems. In the thermodynamic limit of infinite system size N → ∞ systems will have strictly stable macroscopic properties in the sense that transitions between different macroscopic phases (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  17.  7
    Andrew Miles (2009). On a Medicine of the Whole Person: Away From Scientistic Reductionism and Towards the Embrace of the Complex in Clinical Practice. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (6):941-949.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
  18. Brad Berman (forthcoming). Making the World Body Whole and Complete: Plato's Timaeus, 32c5-33b1. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition.
    Plato’s demiurge makes a series of questionable decisions in creating the world. Most notoriously, he endeavors to replicate, to the extent possible, some of the features that his model possesses just insofar as it is a Form. This has provoked the colorful complaint that the demiurge is as raving mad as a general contractor who constructs a house of vellum to better realize the architect’s vellum plans (Keyt 1971). The present paper considers the sanity of the demiurge’s reasoning in light (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  3
    Michael J. Deem (2016). Whole-Genome Sequencing and Disability in the NICU: Exploring Practical and Ethical Challenges. Pediatrics 137 (s1):S47-S55.
  20.  52
    H. Hudson (1955). People and Part-Whole Talk. Analysis 15 (March):90-93.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  6
    Edward A. Bilodeau (1955). Variations in Knowledge of Component Performance and its Effects Upon Part-Part and Part-Whole Relations. Journal of Experimental Psychology 50 (3):215.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  3
    S. D. S. Spragg (1943). The Relative Difficulty of Morse Code Alphabet Characters Learned by the Whole Method. Journal of Experimental Psychology 33 (2):108.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  23.  3
    Gordon Wood (1969). Whole-Part Transfer From Paired-Associate to Free Recall Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 82 (3):532.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  3
    Allan L. Fingeret & W. J. Brogden (1970). Part Versus Whole Practice in the Acquisition of Serial Lists as a Function of Class and Organization of Material. Journal of Experimental Psychology 83 (3p1):406.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  3
    Kristien Hens (2011). Whole Genome Sequencing of Children’s DNA for Research: Points to Consider. Journal of Clinical Research and Bioethics 2 (7).
    This report is grounded in several social concepts: First, the primary goal of genetic testing should be to promote the well-being of the child. Second, the recognition that children are part of a network of family relationships supports an approach to potential conflicts that is not adversarial but, rather, emphasizes a deliberative process that seeks to promote the child's well-being within this context. Third, as children grow through successive stages of cognitive and moral development, parents and professionals should be attentive (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  1
    E. M. Hanawalt (1934). Whole and Part Methods in Trial and Error Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 17 (5):691.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  1
    H. L. Koch (1923). A Neglected Phase of the Part-Whole Problem. Journal of Experimental Psychology 6 (5):366.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  1
    Allan L. Fingeret & W. J. Brogden (1972). Item Arrangement Effects on Transfer and Serial Position Errors in Part-Whole Learning of Different Materials. Journal of Experimental Psychology 93 (2):249.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  1
    Judith Goggin & Charles Stokes (1969). Whole and Part Learning as a Function of Approximation to English. Journal of Experimental Psychology 81 (1):67.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  1
    Gordon Wood (1969). Whole-Part Transfer From Free Recall to Serial Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 79 (3p1):540.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Leo Postman & Judith Goggin (1966). Whole Versus Part Learning of Paired-Associate Lists. Journal of Experimental Psychology 71 (6):867.
  32.  1
    Lynn Hasher (1971). Retention of Free Recall Learning: The Whole-Part Problem. Journal of Experimental Psychology 90 (1):8.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  1
    Robert E. Hicks & Robert K. Young (1972). Part-Whole List Transfer in Free Recall: A Reappraisal. Journal of Experimental Psychology 96 (2):328-333.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  1
    Robert E. Hicks & Robert K. Young (1973). Part-Whole Transfer in Free Recall as a Function of Word Class and Imagery. Journal of Experimental Psychology 101 (1):100.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  1
    Michael Gladis & Osborne Abbey (1969). Relationship Between Whole and Part Methods of Learning and Degree of Meaningfulness of Serial Lists. Journal of Experimental Psychology 81 (1):194.
  36.  1
    Henry Loess & Alan Brown (1969). Word Fragments as Aids to Recall a Whole Word. Journal of Experimental Psychology 80 (2p1):384.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Ronald Okada & Stephen T. Carey (1974). Whole-List Retention Following Whole-Part Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (2):332.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. M. V. Seagoe (1936). The Influence of Degree of Wholeness on Whole-Part Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 19 (6):763.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Biswanath Sen (1985). The Concepts of Part and Whole (Avayava and Avayavi). Rabindra Bharati University.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  44
    Roberto Loss (forthcoming). Parts Ground the Whole and Are Identical to It. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-10.
    What is the relation between parts taken together and the whole that they compose? The recent literature appears to be dominated by two different answers to this question, which are normally thought of as being incompatible. According to the first, parts taken together are identical to the whole that they compose. According to the second, the whole is grounded in its parts. The aim of this paper is to make some theoretical room for the view according to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Ross P. Cameron (2014). Parts Generate the Whole, but They Are Not Identical to It. In Aaron J. Cotnoir & Donald L. M. Baxter (eds.), Composition as Identity. Oxford University Press
    The connection between whole and part is intimate: not only can we share the same space, but I’m incapable of leaving my parts behind; settle the nonmereological facts and you thereby settle what is a part of what; wholes don’t seem to be an additional ontological commitment over their parts. Composition as identity promises to explain this intimacy. But it threatens to make the connection too intimate, for surely the parts could have made a different whole and the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Ben Bramble (2014). Whole-Life Welfarism. American Philosophical Quarterly 51 (1):63-74.
    In this paper, I set out and defend a new theory of value, whole-life welfarism. According to this theory, something is good only if it makes somebody better off in some way in his life considered as a whole. By focusing on lifetime, rather than momentary, well-being, a welfarist can solve two of the most vexing puzzles in value theory, The Badness of Death and The Problem of Additive Aggregation.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  43. Alex Steinberg (2015). Priority Monism and Part/Whole Dependence. Philosophical Studies 172 (8):2025-2031.
    Priority monism is the view that the cosmos is the only independent concrete object. The paper argues that, pace its proponents, Priority monism is in conflict with the dependence of any whole on any of its parts: if the cosmos does not depend on its parts, neither does any smaller composite.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Matthew W. Parker (2013). Set Size and the Part-Whole Principle. Review of Symbolic Logic (4):1-24.
    Recent work has defended “Euclidean” theories of set size, in which Cantor’s Principle (two sets have equally many elements if and only if there is a one-to-one correspondence between them) is abandoned in favor of the Part-Whole Principle (if A is a proper subset of B then A is smaller than B). It has also been suggested that Gödel’s argument for the unique correctness of Cantor’s Principle is inadequate. Here we see from simple examples, not that Euclidean theories of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  4
    Ben Chan, Flavia M. Facio, Haley Eidem, Sara Chandros Hull, Leslie G. Biesecker & Benjamin E. Berkman (2012). Genomic Inheritances: Disclosing Individual Research Results From Whole-Exome Sequencing to Deceased Participants' Relatives. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (10):1-8.
    Whole-genome analysis and whole-exome analysis generate many more clinically actionable findings than traditional targeted genetic analysis. These findings may be relevant to research participants themselves as well as for members of their families. Though researchers performing genomic analyses are likely to find medically significant genetic variations for nearly every research participant, what they will find for any given participant is unpredictable. The ubiquity and diversity of these findings complicate questions about disclosing individual genetic test results. We outline an (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  46. William Lauinger (2014). Eternity, Boredom, and One's Part-Whole-Reality Conception. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 88 (1):1-28.
    Bernard Williams famously argued that eternal life is undesirable for a human because it would inevitably grow intolerably boring. I will argue against Williams and those who share his view. To make my case, I will provide an account of what staves off boredom in our current, earthly-mortal lives, and then I will draw on this account while advancing reasons for thinking that eternal life is desirable, given certain conditions. Though my response to Williams will partly overlap with some prior (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  6
    Roberto Loss (2015). Parts Ground the Whole and Are Identical to It. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 94 (3):489-498.
    ABSTRACTWhat is the relation between parts taken together and the whole that they compose? The recent literature appears to be dominated by two different answers to this question, which are normally thought of as being incompatible. According to the first, parts taken together are identical to the whole that they compose. According to the second, the whole is grounded in its parts. The aim of this paper is to make some theoretical room for the view according to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Alan C. Love & Andreas Hüttemann (2011). COMPARING PART-WHOLE REDUCTIVE EXPLANATIONS IN BIOLOGY AND PHYSICS. In Dennis Dieks, Wenceslao Gonzalo, Thomas Uebel, Stephan Hartmann & Marcel Weber (eds.), Explanation, Prediction, and Confirmation. Springer 183--202.
    Many biologists and philosophers have worried that importing models of reasoning from the physical sciences obscures our understanding of reasoning in the life sciences. In this paper we discuss one example that partially validates this concern: part-whole reductive explanations. Biology and physics tend to incorporate different models of temporality in part-whole reductive explanations. This results from differential emphases on compositional and causal facets of reductive explanations, which have not been distinguished reliably in prior philosophical analyses. Keeping these two (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  49. Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther (2011). Part-Whole Science. Synthese 178 (3):397-427.
    A scientific explanatory project, part-whole explanation, and a kind of science, part-whole science are premised on identifying, investigating, and using parts and wholes. In the biological sciences, mechanistic, structuralist, and historical explanations are part-whole explanations. Each expresses different norms, explananda, and aims. Each is associated with a distinct partitioning frame for abstracting kinds of parts. These three explanatory projects can be complemented in order to provide an integrative vision of the whole system, as is shown for (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  50.  62
    Mike Nair-Collins (2010). Death, Brain Death, and the Limits of Science: Why the Whole-Brain Concept of Death Is a Flawed Public Policy. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 38 (3):667-683.
    Legally defining “death” in terms of brain death unacceptably obscures a value judgment that not all reasonable people would accept. This is disingenuous, and it results in serious moral flaws in the medical practices surrounding organ donation. Public policy that relies on the whole-brain concept of death is therefore morally flawed and in need of revision.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000