Search results for 'Wildness' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Martin Drenthen (2005). Wildness as Critical Border Concept; Nietzsche and the Debate on Wilderness Restoration. Environmental Values 14 (3):317-337.score: 24.0
    How can environmental philosophy benefit from Friedrich Nietzsche's radical critique of morality? In this paper, it is argued that Nietzsche's account of nature provides us with a challenging diagnosis of the modern crisis in our relationship with nature. Moreover, his interpretation of wildness can elucidate our concern with the value of wilderness as a place of value beyond the sphere of human intervention. For Nietzsche, wild nature is a realm where moral valuations are out of order. In his work, (...)
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  2. Thomas H. Birch (1990). The Incarceration of Wildness: Wilderness Areas as Prisons. Environmental Ethics 12 (1):3-26.score: 18.0
    Even with the very best intentions , Western culture’s approach to wilderness and wildness, the otherness of nature, tends to be one of imperialistic domination and appropriation. Nevertheless, in spite of Western culture’s attempt to gain total control over nature by imprisoning wildness in wilderness areas, which are meant to be merely controlled “simulations” of wildness, a real wildness, a real otherness, can still be found in wilderness reserves . This wildness can serve as the (...)
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  3. Isis Brook (2008). Wildness in the English Garden Tradition: A Reassessment of the Picturesque From Environmental Philosophy. Ethics and the Environment 13 (1):pp. 105-119.score: 18.0
    The picturesque is usually interpreted as an admiration of 'picture-like,' and thus inauthentic, nature. In contrast, this paper sets out an interpretation that is more in accord with the contemporary love of wildness. This paper will briefly cover some garden history in order to contextualize the discussion and proceed by reassessing the picturesque through the eighteenth century works of Price and Watelet. It will then identify six themes in their work (variety, intricacy, engagement, time, chance, and transition) and show (...)
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  4. K. I. Booth (forthcoming). In Wilderness and Wildness: Recognising and Responding Within the Agency of Relational Memory. Environmental Ethics 10 (x):xx.score: 18.0
    There are complexity of entities and happenings embodied within the pillars that frame the doorways in our homes and support broad flat spaces that form supermarkets and department stores. Each pillar speaks to the mythology encircling the origins of Gothic architecture; the ideas surrounding the shift from the trunks and boughs of the scared grove towards the columns, arches and vaults of church and cathedral. Each pillar embodies the evolution of life and the history of the earth. Awakening towards the (...)
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  5. Jim Cheney (1996). The Dusty World: Wildness and Higher Laws in Thoreau's Walden. Ethics and the Environment 1 (2):75 - 90.score: 18.0
    To the attentive reader, the high contrast between Thoreau's depiction of a life in conformity to "Higher Laws" and his depiction of Wildness can seem to be yet another endorsement of nature/culture dualism. I argue that while such a dualism frames much of Thoreau's "experiment" at Walden Pond, a deeper understanding of the relationship between Higher Laws and Wildness emerges which is decidedly nondualistic, an understanding for which I invoke the Buddhist image of the Dusty World. I conclude (...)
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  6. R. Edward Grumbine (1994). Wildness, Wise Use, and Sustainable Development. Environmental Ethics 16 (3):227-249.score: 18.0
    Ideas of wilderness in North America are evolving toward some new configuration. Current wilderness ideology, among other weaknesses, has been charged with encouraging a radical separation between people and nature and with being inadequate to serve the protection of biodiversity. Sustainable development and “wise use” privatization of wildlands have been offered as alternatives to the Western wilderness concept. I review this wilderness debate and argue that critical distinctions between wildness and wilderness and self and other must be settled before (...)
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  7. Kate Booth (2011). In Wilderness and Wildness. Environmental Ethics 33 (3):283-293.score: 18.0
    There is a complexity of entities and happenings embodied within the pillars that frame the doorways in our homes and support the broad flat spaces that form supermarkets and department stores. Each pillar speaks to the mythology encircling the origins of Gothic architecture; the ideas surrounding the shift from the trunks and boughs of the sacred grove toward the columns, arches, and vaults of church and cathedral. Each pillar embodies the evolution of life and the history of the Earth. Awakening (...)
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  8. Sean Williams (2006). Chiasmic Wildness. Environmental Philosophy 3 (1):6-12.score: 18.0
    Whether one’s attention lies with the big wilderness outside or the wild people and places that survive amidst our ecologically impoverished cities and towns, a thorough and rigorous reflection on wildness remains as a task for environmental philosophy. The political and literary movements concerned with the wilderness have sparked passion, insight, and moments of brilliance, but by and large leave us today at best confused, and at worst naïve, with respect to our thinking of wildness. The attempts at (...)
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  9. Kenneth H. Simonsen (1981). The Value of Wildness. Environmental Ethics 3 (3):259-263.score: 16.0
    In his article, “The Nature and Possibility of an Environmental Ethics,” Tom Regan says that the fitting attitude toward nature “is one of admiring respect.” What folIows is an attempt to discover what in nature should impel us to respond in this way. Ultimately I argue that the value of wild nature is found in the fact that it has emerged spontaneously, independent of human designs.
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  10. Kingsley Goodwin (2007). Postmodernism, Deep Ecology and the Idea of Wildness. Ethical Perspectives 14 (4):501-512.score: 15.0
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  11. Boria Sax (1997). What is a "Jewish Dog"? Konrad Lorenz and the Cult of Wildness. Society and Animals 5 (1):3-21.score: 15.0
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  12. Paul F. Schmidt (1987). Freedom and Wildness in Thoreau's “Walking”. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 35:11-15.score: 15.0
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  13. Christopher Thacker (1983). The Wildness Pleases: The Origins of Romanticism. St. Martin's Press.score: 15.0
     
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  14. Carlo Toffalori (1997). Wildness Implies Undecidability for Lattices Over Group Rings. Journal of Symbolic Logic 62 (4):1429-1447.score: 15.0
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  15. Glen Wunderlich (2001). David Peterson, Heartsblood: Hunting, Spirituality, and Wildness in America. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 14 (3):354-358.score: 15.0
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  16. Douglas R. Anderson (1998). Wildness as Political Act. The Personalist Forum 14 (1):65-72.score: 15.0
  17. Mark Halsey (2009). Deleuze and Deliverance : Body, Wildness, Ethics. In Bernd Herzogenrath (ed.), Deleuze/Guattari & Ecology. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 15.0
  18. J. Th Leerssen (1995). Wildness, Wilderness and Ireland: Medieval and Early-Modern Patterns in the Demarcation of Civility. Journal of the History of Ideas 56:25-39.score: 15.0
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  19. Eileen O'Rourke (2000). The Reintroduction and Reinterpretation of the Wild. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 13 (1):144-165.score: 10.0
    This paper is concerned with changing social representations of the ``wild,'' in particular wild animals. We argue that within a contemporary Western context the old agricultural perception of wild animals as adversarial and as a threat to domestication, is being replaced by an essentially urban fascination with certain emblematic wild animals, who are seen to embody symbols of naturalness and freedom. On closer examination that carefully mediatized ``naturalness'' may be but another form of domestication. After an historical overview of the (...)
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  20. Joel MacClellan (2013). What the Wild Things Are: A Critique on Clare Palmer's" What (If Anything) Do We Owe Animals?&Quot;. Between the Species: An Electronic Journal for the Study of Philosophy and Animals 16 (1):6.score: 10.0
    This paper critiques Clare Palmer’s “What (if anything) do we owe wild animals?” on three grounds. First, it is argued that, Palmer’s opening case study notwithstanding, there are good empirical reasons to think that we should assist domesticated horses and not wild deer. Then, Palmer’s claim that “wildness is not a capacity” is brought into question, and it is argued that wildness connotes certain capacities which wild animals generally have and which domesticated animals generally lack. Lastly, the “supererogation (...)
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  21. Martin Drenthen (2009). Fatal Attraction. Wildnes in Contemporary Film. Environmental Ethics 31 (3):297-315.score: 9.0
    The concept of wildness not only plays a role in philosophical debates, but also in popular culture. Wild nature is often seen as a place outside the cultural sphere where one can still encounter instances of transcendence. Some writers and moviemakers contest the dominant romanticized view of wild nature by telling stories that somehow show a different harsher face of nature. In encounters with the wild and unruly, humans can sometimes experience the misfit between their well-ordered, human-centered, self-created world (...)
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  22. Nivedita Gangopadhyay (2011). The Extended Mind: Born to Be Wild? A Lesson From Action-Understanding. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (3):377-397.score: 8.0
    The extended mind hypothesis (Clark and Chalmers in Analysis 58(1):7–19, 1998; Clark 2008) is an influential hypothesis in philosophy of mind and cognitive science. I argue that the extended mind hypothesis is born to be wild. It has undeniable and irrepressible tendencies of flouting grounding assumptions of the traditional information-processing paradigm. I present case-studies from social cognition which not only support the extended mind proposal but also bring out its inherent wildness. In particular, I focus on cases of action-understanding (...)
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  23. Bernice Bovenkerk, Frans Stafleu, Ronno Tramper, Jan Vorstenbosch & Frans W. A. Brom (2003). To Act or Not to Act? Sheltering Animals From the Wild: A Pluralistic Account of a Conflict Between Animal and Environmental Ethics. Ethics, Place and Environment 6 (1):13 – 26.score: 8.0
    The leading question of this article is whether it is acceptable, from a moral point of view, to take wild animals that are ill out of their natural habitat and temporarily bring them under human control with the purpose of curing them. To this end the so-called 'seal debate' was examined. In the Netherlands, seals that are lost or ill are rescued and taken into shelters, where they are cured and afterwards reintroduced into their natural environment. Recently, this practice has (...)
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  24. Eric Katz (1992). The Call of the Wild: The Struggle Against Domination and the Technological Fix of Nature. Environmental Ethics 14 (3):265-273.score: 8.0
    In this essay, I use encounters with the white-tailed deer of Fire Island to explore the “call of the wild”—the attraction to value that exists in a natural world outside of human control. Value exists in nature to the extent that it avoids modification by human technology. Technology “fixes” the natural world by improving it for human use or by restoring degraded ecosystems. Technology creates a “new world,” an artifactual reality that is far removed from the “wildness” of nature. (...)
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  25. Jac A. A. Swart (2004). The Wild Animal as a Research Animal. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (2):181-197.score: 8.0
    Most discussions on animal experimentation refer to domesticated animals and regulations are tailored to this class of animals. However, wild animals are also used for research, e.g., in biological field research that is often directed to fundamental ecological-evolutionary questions or to conservation goals. There are several differences between domesticated and wild animals that are relevant for evaluation of the acceptability of animal experiments. Biological features of wild animals are often more critical as compared with domesticated animals because of their survival (...)
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  26. Lida Anestidou (2004). Commentary on “the Gladiator Sparrow: Ethical Issues in Behavioral Research on Captive Populations of Wild Animals”. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (4):731-734.score: 8.0
    This case involves invasive research on captive wild populations of birds to study aggressive animal behavior. The case and associated commentaries raise and examine fundamental issues: whether and under what conditions, such research is ethically justified when the research has no expected, direct application to the human species; the moral status of animals and how one balances concern for the animal’s interests against the value of gains in scientific knowledge. They also emphasize the issue of the importance of a thorough (...)
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  27. Brian Schrag (2004). Commentary on “the Gladiator Sparrow: Ethical Issues in Behavioral Research on Captive Populations of Wild Animals”. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (4):726-730.score: 8.0
    This case involves invasive research on captive wild populations of birds to study aggressive animal behavior. The case and associated commentaries raise and examine fundamental issues: whether and under what conditions, such research is ethically justified when the research has no expected, direct application to the human species; the moral status of animals and how one balances concern for the animal’s interests against the value of gains in scientific knowledge. They also emphasize the issue of the importance of a thorough (...)
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  28. Henning Trüper (2013). Wild Archives Unsteady Records of the Past in the Travels of Enno Littmann. History of the Human Sciences 26 (4):128-148.score: 8.0
    The article examines the scholarly travels of Enno Littmann (1875–1958) in Syria and Ethiopia as providing an alternative model for understanding ‘the archive’ as a theoretical topos in connection with the production of historical knowledge in the 19th century. The argument seeks to dismantle the nexus between classification and modern European statehood – here discussed with the help of Derrida’s Mal d’archive – that has come to dominate debates on the epistemological place of the archive. Instead, the article seeks to (...)
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  29. I. I. I. Rolston (1983). Values Gone Wild. Inquiry 26 (2):181 – 207.score: 8.0
    Wilderness valued as mere resource for human?interest satisfaction is challenged in favor of wilderness as a productive source, in which humans have roots, but which also yields wild neighbors and aliens with intrinsic value. Wild value is storied achievement in an evolutionary ecosystem, with instrumental and intrinsic, organismic and systemic values intermeshed. Survival value is reconsidered in this light. Changing cultural appreciations of values in wilderness can transform and relativize our judgments about appropriate conduct there. A final valued element in (...)
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  30. Christine M. Reed (2012). Enriching the Lives of Wild Horses: Designing Opportunities for Them to Flourish. Environmental Values 21 (3):317 - 329.score: 8.0
    Wild horses are becoming dependent on transitional environments between domesticity and wildness. In Dutch new nature areas they are learning to perform roles as ecological surrogates for their extinct ancestors. In the U.S. wild horses are 'feral' and exist in numbers deemed to be in excess of the carrying capacity of semi-arid public range lands. The federal government is removing and relocating thousands to long-term holding pastures. The capabilities approach of Nussbaum (2006) allows us to evaluate this transitional environment (...)
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  31. Todd M. Freeberg (2004). Commentary on “the Gladiator Sparrow: Ethical Issues in Behavioral Research on Captive Populations of Wild Animals”. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (4):721-725.score: 8.0
    This case involves invasive research on captive wild populations of birds to study aggressive animal behavior. The case and associated commentaries raise and examine fundamental issues: whether and under what conditions, such research is ethically justified when the research has no expected, direct application to the human species; the moral status of animals and how one balances concern for the animal’s interests against the value of gains in scientific knowledge. They also emphasize the issue of the importance of a thorough (...)
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  32. Susan Nance (2012). On Wild Animals, Hubris, and Redemption. Society and Animals 20 (4):401-407.score: 7.0
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  33. Marc Bekoff (2004). Wild Justice and Fair Play: Cooperation, Forgiveness, and Morality in Animals. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 19 (4):489-520.score: 6.0
    In this paper I argue that we can learn much about wild justice and the evolutionary origins of social morality – behaving fairly – by studying social play behavior in group-living animals, and that interdisciplinary cooperation will help immensely. In our efforts to learn more about the evolution of morality we need to broaden our comparative research to include animals other than non-human primates. If one is a good Darwinian, it is premature to claim that only humans can be empathic (...)
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  34. Stephen R. L. Clark (1979). The Rights of Wild Things. Inquiry 22 (1-4):171 – 188.score: 6.0
    It has been argued that if non-human animals had rights we should be obliged to defend them against predators. I contend that this either does not follow, follows in the abstract but not in practice, or is not absurd. We should defend non-humans against large or unusual dangers, when we can, but should not claim so much authority as to regulate all the relationships of wild things. Some non-human animals are members of our society, and the rhetoric of 'the land (...)
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  35. Ben Ridder (2007). An Exploration of the Value of Naturalness and Wild Nature. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (2):195-213.score: 6.0
    The source of the value of naturalness is of considerable relevance for the conservation movement, to philosophers, and to society generally. However, naturalness is a complex quality and resists straightforward definition. Here, two interpretations of what is “natural” are explored. One of these assesses the naturalness of species and ecosystems with reference to a benchmark date, such as the advent of industrialization. The value of naturalness in this case largely reflects prioritization of the value of biodiversity. However, the foundation of (...)
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  36. Mark Alfano (2012). Wilde Heuristics and Rum Tum Tuggers: Preference Indeterminacy and Instability. Synthese 189 (S1):5-15.score: 6.0
    Models in decision theory and game theory assume that preferences are determinate: for any pair of possible outcomes, a and b, an agent either prefers a to b, prefers b to a, or is indifferent as between a and b. Preferences are also assumed to be stable: provided the agent is fully informed, trivial situational influences will not shift the order of her preferences. Research by behavioral economists suggests, however, that economic and hedonic preferences are to some degree indeterminate and (...)
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  37. Christophe Boesch (2005). Joint Cooperative Hunting Among Wild Chimpanzees: Taking Natural Observations Seriously. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):692-693.score: 6.0
    Ignoring most published evidence on wild chimpanzees, Tomasello et al.'s claim that shared goals and intentions are uniquely human amounts to a faith statement. A brief survey of chimpanzee hunting tactics shows that group hunts are compatible with a shared goals and intentions hypothesis. The disdain of observational data in experimental psychology leads some to ignore the reality of animal cognitive achievements.
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  38. Doug Anderson (2003). Respectability and the Wild Beasts of the Philosophical Desert: The Heart of James's. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 17 (1):1-13.score: 6.0
    This commentary was suggested to me in part by a colleague's remark that it would be nice if we could make William James's The Varieties of Religious Experience "respectable." The implication was that though there was something redeemable about the book, it somehow wasn't philosophically or scientifically proper. The remark awakened me to—or at least reminded me of—the fact that this has been a traditional take on James's text. As Julius Bixler points out, ridicule began soon after the book was (...)
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  39. Jac Swart & Jozef Keulartz (2011). Wild Animals in Our Backyard. A Contextual Approach to the Intrinsic Value of Animals. Acta Biotheoretica 59 (2):185-200.score: 6.0
    As a reflection on recent debates on the value of wild animals we examine the question of the intrinsic value of wild animals in both natural and man-made surroundings. We examine the concepts being wild and domesticated. In our approach we consider animals as dependent on their environment, whether it is a human or a natural environment. Stressing this dependence we argue that a distinction can be made between three different interpretations of a wild animal’s intrinsic value: a species-specific, a (...)
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  40. William L. McBride (2011). John Wild, Phenomenology in America, and the Origins of SPEP. Continental Philosophy Review 44 (3):281-284.score: 6.0
    John Wild, phenomenology in America, and the origins of SPEP Content Type Journal Article Pages 281-284 DOI 10.1007/s11007-011-9194-5 Authors William L. McBride, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA Journal Continental Philosophy Review Online ISSN 1573-1103 Print ISSN 1387-2842 Journal Volume Volume 44 Journal Issue Volume 44, Number 3.
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  41. Sarah Mercer & Clare Sandford-Couch (2013). Legal Ethics in the Trial of Oscar Wilde. Legal Ethics 16 (1):119-133.score: 6.0
    This paper considers, in the context of an undergraduate law degree, how to encourage students to develop an awareness of ethical issues relating to membership of a 'profession' and how lawyers could and should conduct themselves, whilst retaining the notion of a law degree as part of a liberal arts education. It suggests an interdisciplinary approach, both in its content and its methodologies, as an innovative and interesting means of addressing issues of legal ethics and professional responsibility. It offers an (...)
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  42. J. Baird Callicott, Jonathan Parker, Jordan Batson, Nathan Bell, Keith Brown & Samantha Moss (2011). The Other in A Sand County Almanac. Aldo Leopold’s Animals and His Wild-Animal Ethic. Environmental Ethics 33 (2):115-146.score: 6.0
    Much philosophical attention has been devoted to “The Land Ethic,” especially by Anglo-American philosophers, but little has been paid to A Sand County Almanac as a whole. Read through the lens of continental philosophy, A Sand County Almanac promulgates an evolutionary-ecological world view and effects a personal self- and a species-specific Self-transformation in its audience. It’s author, Aldo Leopold, realizes these aims through descriptive reflection that has something in common with phenomenology-although Leopold was by no stretch of the imagination a (...)
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  43. Charles J. List (2005). The Virtues of Wild Leisure. Environmental Ethics 27 (4):355-373.score: 6.0
    The land ethic of Aldo Leopold has increasingly received attention as an example of an environmental virtue ethic. However, an important remaining question is how to cultivate and transmit environmental virtues. The answer to this question can be found in the pursuit of wild leisure. The classical view of leisure primarily as articulated in Aristotle’s Politics provides a good starting point for an examination of wild leisure. Leopold thought wild leisure was important and associated it with his land ethic. Leopold’s (...)
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  44. Beril İdemen Sözmen (2013). Harm in the Wild: Facing Non-Human Suffering in Nature. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (5):1075-1088.score: 6.0
    The paper is concerned with whether the reductio of the natural-harm-argument can be avoided by disvaluing non-human suffering and death. According to the natural-harm-argument, alleviating the suffering of non-human animals is not a moral obligation for human beings because such an obligation would also morally prescribe human intervention in nature for the protection of non-human animal interests which, it claims, is absurd. It is possible to avoid the reductio by formulating the moral obligation to alleviate non-human suffering and death with (...)
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  45. Julia V. Douthwaite (2002). The Wild Girl, Natural Man, and the Monster: Dangerous Experiments in the Age of Enlightenment. University of Chicago Press.score: 6.0
    This study looks at the lives of the most famous "wild children" of eighteenth-century Europe, showing how they open a window onto European ideas about the potential and perfectibility of mankind. Julia V. Douthwaite recounts reports of feral children such as the wild girl of Champagne (captured in 1731 and baptized as Marie-Angelique Leblanc), offering a fascinating glimpse into beliefs about the difference between man and beast and the means once used to civilize the uncivilized. A variety of educational experiments (...)
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  46. Morris Kaplan, Literature in the Dock: The Trials of Oscar Wilde.score: 6.0
    This essay uses the recently published expanded record of the Queensberry libel trial to revisit the relationship between the 'literary' and 'sexual' dimensions of the Wilde scandal. The defence was guided by an integrated conception of the links between the two that shaped both the public responses and the legal proceedings, including the criminal prosecution. The conflict between moral literalism and aesthetic indeterminacy not only informed the legal determination of sexual guilt but also was inflected by social class in ways (...)
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  47. James M. Tallmon (1994). How Jonsen Really Views Casuistry: A Note on the Abuse of Father Wildes. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19 (1):103-113.score: 6.0
    Kevin Wildes has recently argued in the Journal that Albert Jonsen's model of casuistry is ill-suited to a secular world context, because this model is rooted in a particular history and because of the moral pluralism of contemporary society in which a content-specific method of moral reasoning cannot readily be deployed. Contra Wildes, two arguments are offered. First, casuistry is not tied exclusively to Roman Catholic theology; casuistry also has deep roots in Classical thought, (...) roots that Jonsen and Toulmin underscore. Second, the context of Roman Catholic theology can be distinguished from the method of casuistry, permitting that method to be deployed successfully in morally pluralistic contexts. Keywords: casuistry, content, Jonsen, method, rhetoric, Toulmin, Wildes CiteULike Connotea Del.icio.us What's this?. (shrink)
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  48. Adam Clark Arcadi (2003). Is Gestural Communication More Sophisticated Than Vocal Communication in Wild Chimpanzees? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):210-211.score: 6.0
    The communicative behavior of chimpanzees has been cited in support of the hypothesis that language evolved from gesture. In this commentary, I compare gestural and vocal communication in wild chimpanzees. Because the use of gesture in wild chimpanzees is limited, whereas their vocal behavior is relatively complex, I argue that wild chimpanzee behavior fails to support the gestural origins hypothesis.
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  49. Morgan Fritz (2013). Utopian Experimentation and Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray. [REVIEW] Utopian Studies 24 (2):283-311.score: 6.0
    Oscar Wilde’s interest in utopia is well known, largely because of the famous aphoristic statement—a departure from the usual Wildean epigram—found in the midst of his essay “The Soul of Man Under Socialism” (1891). To the anticipated criticism that his vision of a world in which scientists use “wonderful and marvelous things” to replace human labor might seem pejoratively “Utopian,” he responds that “a map of the world that does not include Utopia is not worth even glancing at, for it (...)
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