Search results for 'Will Grant Chambers' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Will Grant Chambers (1906). Memory Types of Colorado Pupils. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 3 (9):231-234.score: 870.0
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  2. C. K. Grant (1952). Free Will: A Reply to Professor Campbell's Is 'Free Will' a Pseudo-Problem?. Mind 61 (July):381-385.score: 480.0
     
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  3. Brian Grant (1976). Descartes, Belief and the Will. Philosophy 51 (198):401 - 419.score: 360.0
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  4. Timothy Chambers (forthcoming). The Free Will Defense: Do the Ends Justify the Means? Philosophia Christi,??(??),??-??.score: 360.0
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  5. Judith Grant (1993). Fundamental Feminism: Contesting the Core Concepts of Feminist Theory. Routledge.score: 300.0
    What makes feminist theory feminist? How did so many different feminisms come to exist? In Fundamental Feminism, Judith Grant addresses these questions by offering a critical exploration of the evolution of feminist theory and the state of feminist thinking today. Grant provides a lively assessment of the major problems of contemporary feminist thought and identifies a set of common assumptions that link the wide variety of feminist theories in existence. Fundamental Feminism calls for nothing less than a substantial (...)
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  6. Simone Chambers & Will Kymlicka (eds.) (2001). Alternative Conceptions of Civil Society. Princeton University Press.score: 240.0
    This text considers how a host of ethical traditions define civil society.
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  7. Joel Bateman and Will Grant (2005). Book Review: Honour Among Nations: Treaties and Agreements with Indigenous People, Edited by Marcia Langton, Maureen Tehan, Lisa Palmer and Kathryn Shain (Melbourne University Press, 2004) $39.95, ISBN 0-522 85106-1. [REVIEW] Dialogue 3 (2):109-113.score: 240.0
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  8. Joel Bateman and Will Grant (2005). Book Review: Helen Irving, Five Things to Know About the Australian Constitution. Melbourne, Cambridge, 2004. $32.95. 162pp. ISBN: 0 521 603706. [REVIEW] Dialogue 3 (2):107-109.score: 240.0
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  9. Vikram Chandra, J. Hillis Miller, Gayatri Chakravorty, Ben Baer, Homi Bhabha, Grant Farred, Paul Jahshan, Bill Ashcroft, Stephen Morton, Dorota Kolodziejczyk, Adam Muller, Claire Chambers, James M. Ivory, David Lorne Macdonald, Sangeeta Ray, Pushpa N. Parekh, Maria Sofia Pimentel Biscaia, David Mesher, Cara Cilano, Dora Sales Salvador, Ryan Mowat, Joanne Trevenna, Amy Lee & Sumana Roy (2006). (In)Fusion Approach: Theory, Contestation, Limits. University Press of America.score: 240.0
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  10. George Parkin Grant (1995). George Grant in Conversation. Anansi.score: 210.0
    "Historian Ramsay Cook called George Grant one of Canadas two most important political thinkers in the twentieth century.
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  11. Transforming Will (2010). Samoans Have a Word for “Will”—Loto—but Anthropologists Have Not Always Translated It Thusly, Which Puzzled Me When I First Began Doing Ethnography in American Sāmoa in the 1980s. I Was Taking a Language Class Kindly Offered to Stateside Teachers by a High-Ranking Member of the Government. He Decided to Teach Us a Love Song, Chanting the Language Into Our Heads. He Gave Us the Samoan Version and an English Translation with Every Word Glossed but One—Loto. After Class, I Asked Him to Translate It. He ... [REVIEW] In Keith M. Murphy & C. Jason Throop (eds.), Toward an Anthropology of the Will. Stanford University Press. 123.score: 210.0
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  12. Frederick L. Will (1947). Will the Future Be Like the Past? Mind 56 (224):332-347.score: 120.0
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  13. David McCabe (2003). Simone Chambers and Will Kymlicka, Eds., Alternative Conceptions of Civil Society:Alternative Conceptions of Civil Society. Ethics 113 (4):871-873.score: 120.0
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  14. Matt Matravers (2004). Simone Chambers and Will Kymlicka, Eds., Alternative Conceptions of Civil Society Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 24 (1):20-21.score: 120.0
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  15. Ben Woodard (2010). Mad Speculation and Absolute Inhumanism: Lovecraft, Ligotti, and the Weirding of Philosophy. Continent 1 (1):3-13.score: 81.0
    continent. 1.1 (2011): 3-13. / 0/ – Introduction I want to propose, as a trajectory into the philosophically weird, an absurd theoretical claim and pursue it, or perhaps more accurately, construct it as I point to it, collecting the ground work behind me like the Perpetual Train from China Mieville's Iron Council which puts down track as it moves reclaiming it along the way. The strange trajectory is the following: Kant's critical philosophy and much of continental philosophy which has followed, (...)
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  16. Vincent W. J. Van Gerven Oei (2012). The Poetry of Jean Daive. Continent 2 (2).score: 81.0
    continent. 2.2 (2012): 82–98 NOTE: This text is a translation of the original essay “Tekendichtheid: Over Jean Daives Narration d’équilibre 2: ‘Sllt’ ,” published in Parmentier 21.2 (2012): p. 65-71, accompanied by the same selection of poems in Dutch translation. It is not my intention to offer the following notes pertaining to one part of the series Narration d’équilibre [ Narrative of equilibrium ], written by the poet, translator, photographer, encyclopedist, and radio maker Jean Daive (1941), as a meticulous overview (...)
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  17. Bert Baumgaertner (2014). Yes, No, Maybe So: A Veritistic Approach to Echo Chambers Using a Trichotomous Belief Model. Synthese 191 (11):2549-2569.score: 66.0
    I approach the study of echo chambers from the perspective of veritistic social epistemology. A trichotomous belief model is developed featuring a mechanism by which agents will have a tendency to form agreement in the community. The model is implemented as an agent-based model in NetLogo and then used to investigate a social practice called Impartiality, which is a plausible means for resisting or dismantling echo chambers. The implementation exposes additional factors that need close consideration in an (...)
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  18. Malcolm Forster & Elliott Sober (1994). How to Tell When Simpler, More Unified, or Less Ad Hoc Theories Will Provide More Accurate Predictions. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (1):1-35.score: 54.0
    Traditional analyses of the curve fitting problem maintain that the data do not indicate what form the fitted curve should take. Rather, this issue is said to be settled by prior probabilities, by simplicity, or by a background theory. In this paper, we describe a result due to Akaike [1973], which shows how the data can underwrite an inference concerning the curve's form based on an estimate of how predictively accurate it will be. We argue that this approach throws (...)
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  19. David Basinger & Randall Basinger (1982). Divine Determinateness and the Free Will Defense. Philosophy Research Archives 8:531-534.score: 54.0
    Proponents of The Free Will Defense frequently argue that it is necessary for God to create self-directing beings who possess the capacity for producing evil because, in the words of F.R. Tennant, “moral goodness must be the result of a self-directing developmental process.” But if this is true, David Paulsen has recently argued, then the proponent of the Free Will Defense cannot claim that God has an eternally determinate nature. For if God has an eternally determinatenature and moral (...)
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  20. Grant R. Gillett (2001). Free Will and Events in the Brain. Journal of Mind and Behavior 22 (3):287-310.score: 48.0
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  21. Grant R. Gillett (1993). Freedom of the Will and Mental Content. Ratio 6 (2):89-107.score: 48.0
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  22. Vincent W. J. Van Gerven Oei (2012). Cumposition: Theses on Philosophy's Etymology. Continent 2 (1).score: 43.0
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 44–55. Philosophers are sperm, poetry erupts sperm and dribbles, philosopher recodes term, to terminate, —A. Staley Groves 1 There is, in the relation of human languages to that of things, something that can be approximately described as “overnaming”—the deepest linguistic reason for all melancholy and (from the point of view of the thing) for all deliberate muteness. Overnaming as the linguistic being of melancholy points to another curious relation of language: the overprecision that obtains in the tragic (...)
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  23. Grant Gillett & Sam C. Liu (2012). Free Will and Necker's Cube: Reason, Language and Top-Down Control in Cognitive Neuroscience. Philosophy 87 (01):29-50.score: 42.0
    The debates about human free will are traditionally the concern of metaphysics but neuroscientists have recently entered the field arguing that acts of the will are determined by brain events themselves causal products of other events. We examine that claim through the example of free or voluntary switch of perception in relation to the Necker cube. When I am asked to see the cube in one way, I decide whether I will follow the command (or do as (...)
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  24. Abigail L. Rosenthal (1998). In 'Windowless Chambers'. Inquiry 41 (1):3-20.score: 42.0
    Taking exception to Gilbert Ryle's influentially ironical remark about introspection, that it would be like peering into a 'windowless chamber illuminated by a very peculiar sort of light, and one to which only he [the one attempting the introspecting] has access', this essay claims that introspective awareness of one's actions and motivations in their chronological sequence is not empty but highly informative, not trivial but inseparable from any significant life, and not hopeless but entirely feasible. It is argued that informative (...)
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  25. Matthew Frise (2014). Speaking Freely: On Free Will and the Epistemology of Testimony. Synthese 191 (7):1587-1603.score: 38.0
    Peter Graham has recently given a dilemma purportedly showing the compatibility of libertarianism about free will and the anti-skeptical epistemology of testimony. In the first part of this paper I criticize his dilemma: the first horn either involves a false premise or makes the dilemma invalid. The second horn relies without argument on an implausible assumption about testimonial knowledge, and even if granted, nothing on this horn shows libertarianism does not entail skepticism about testimonial justification. I then argue for (...)
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  26. Roman Altshuler (forthcoming). Free Will, Narrative, and Retroactive Self-Constitution. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-17.score: 38.0
    John Fischer has recently argued that the value of acting freely is the value of self-expression. Drawing on David Velleman’s earlier work, Fischer holds that the value of a life is a narrative value and free will is valuable insofar as it allows us to shape the narrative structure of our lives. This account rests on Fischer’s distinction between regulative control and guidance control. While we lack the former kind of control, on Fischer’s view, the latter is all that (...)
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  27. Michael E. Bratman (2003). A Desire of One's Own. Journal of Philosophy 100 (5):221-42.score: 36.0
    You can sometimes have and be moved by desires which you in some sense disown. The problem is whether we can make sense of these ideas of---as I will say---ownership and rejection of a desire, without appeal to a little person in the head who is looking on at the workings of her desires and giving the nod to some but not to others. Frankfurt's proposed solution to this problem, sketched in his 1971 article, has come to be called (...)
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  28. Daniel Howard-Snyder & Frances Howard-Snyder (1993). The Christian Theodicist's Appeal to Love. Religious Studies 29 (2):185 - 192.score: 36.0
    Many Christian theodicists believe that God's creating us with the capacity to love Him and each other justifies, in large part, God's permitting evil. For example, after reminding us that, according to Christian doctrine, the supreme good for human beings is to enter into a reciprocal love relationship with God, Vincent Brummer recently wrote: In creating human persons in order to love them, God necessarily assumes vulnerability in relation to them. In fact, in this relation, he becomes even more vulnerable (...)
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  29. Alexander Jech (2013). To Will One Thing. American Philosophical Quarterly 50 (2):153-166.score: 36.0
    Before committing suicide, Othello says, "Speak of me as I am; . . . speak of one who loved not wisely, but too well."1 Thinking of his love for Desdemona, we are not likely to agree with his assessment that he loved her "too well," especially if loving well is supposed to require some kind of dependability or concern for her well-being; we would be loath even to grant that he loved her "too much." Othello's love for his wife (...)
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  30. Grant Gillett (2001). Arthroscopic Knee Surgery. Daddy Will Make It Better, Even If It's Arthritis. Hastings Center Report 32 (5):8-8.score: 36.0
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  31. Grant Sterling (2011). The Free Will Defense to the Problem of Evil. In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 36.0
  32. Cathal T. Gallagher, Lisa J. McDonald & Niamh P. McCormack (2014). Undergraduate Research Involving Human Subjects Should Not Be Granted Ethical Approval Unless It is Likely to Be of Publishable Quality. HEC Forum 26 (2):169-180.score: 34.0
    Small-scale research projects involving human subjects have been identified as being effective in developing critical appraisal skills in undergraduate students. In deciding whether to grant ethical approval to such projects, university research ethics committees must weigh the benefits of the research against the risk of harm or discomfort to the participants. As the learning objectives associated with student research can be met without the need for human subjects, the benefit associated with training new healthcare professionals cannot, in itself, justify (...)
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  33. Grant Gillett (2009). The Mind and its Discontents: An Essay in Discursive Psychiatry. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    The first edition of The Mind and its Discontents was a powerful analysis of how, as a society, we view mental illness. In the ten years since the first edition, there has been growing interest in the philosophy of psychiatry, and a new edition of this text is more timely and important than ever. -/- In The Mind and its Discontents, Grant Gillett argues that an understanding of mental illness requires more than just a study of biological models of (...)
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  34. Peter Carruthers (2013). On Central Cognition. Philosophical Studies 170 (1):1-20.score: 28.0
    This article examines what is known about the cognitive science of working memory, and brings the findings to bear in evaluating philosophical accounts of central cognitive processes of thinking and reasoning. It is argued that central cognition is sensory based, depending on the activation and deployment of sensory images of various sorts. Contrary to a broad spectrum of philosophical opinion, the central mind does not contain any workspace within which goals, decisions, intentions, or non-sensory judgments can be active.Introduction: philosophers’ commitmentsMost (...)
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  35. Gang Chen (2009). Hierarchy, Form, and Reality. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (3):437-453.score: 28.0
    Scientific progress in the 20th century has shown that the structure of the world is hierarchical. A philosophical analysis of the hierarchy will bear obvious significance for metaphysics and philosophy in general. Jonathan Schaffer’s paper, “Is There a Fundamental Level?”, provides a systematic review of the works in the field, the difficulties for various versions of fundamentalism, and the prospect for the third option, i.e., to treat each level as ontologically equal. The purpose of this paper is to provide (...)
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  36. Christopher Martin (2011). Philosophy of Education in the Public Sphere: The Case of “Relevance”. Studies in Philosophy and Education 30 (6):615-629.score: 28.0
    Universities are under increasing pressure to demonstrate the economic and social relevance of the research they produce. In the UK, for example, recent developments in the UK under the Research Excellence Framework (REF) suggest that future funding schemes will grant “significant additional recognition…where researchers build on excellent research to deliver demonstrable benefits to the economy, society, public policy, culture and quality of life” (HEFCE 2009 ). Having conceded that this and similar developments are likely to continue into the (...)
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  37. Lauren Slive & Ryan Cramer (2012). Health Reform and the Preservation of Confidential Health Care for Young Adults. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (2):383-390.score: 28.0
    A major issue facing the health of young adults in the United States is the often unintentional lack of confidentiality maintained in the provision of sensitive health services. Of primary concern is that young adults who remain on their parents' health insurance plans forgo Sexually Transmitted Infection screening and treatment, as well as other sensitive services such as family planning services and mental health treatment out of a concern that explanation of benefit forms from such services will inform their (...)
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  38. Akbar Nikkhah (2012). Frontier Science Philosophies for Quality Lives. Open Journal of Philosophy 2 (2):128-129.score: 28.0
    The optimum science benefits to routine life have insufficiently been proved. Science progress is not merely reflected in machinery and technological breakthroughs. Subordinate impacts of science and scientists on global interactions are an evidence for the major deficiencies and futility of the many current science designations. A primary objective is to describe postmodern global interrelations of science mentoring policies and life quality. Also, global programs are proposed that will aid in the timely achievement of optimal real-life science goals. The (...)
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  39. Robert H. Kane (ed.) (2001). Free Will. Blackwell.score: 27.0
    Over the past three decades, I have been developing a distinctive view of free will motivated by a desire to reconcile a non-determinist (incompatibilistor libertarian) view of free will with modern science as well as with recent developments in philosophy. A view of free will of the kind I defend (called a “causalindeterminist” or “event-causal” view in the current literature) did not exist in a developed form before the 1980s, but is now discussed in the philosophical literature (...)
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  40. Manuel Vargas (forthcoming). Situationism and Moral Responsibility: Free Will in Fragments. In Tillman Vierkant, Julian Kiverstein & Andy Clark (eds.), Decomposing the Will. Oxford UP.score: 27.0
    Many prominent accounts of free will and moral responsibility make use of the idea that agents can be responsive to reasons. Call such theories Reasons accounts. In what follows, I consider the tenability of Reasons accounts in light of situationist social psychology and, to a lesser extent, the automaticity literature. In the first half of this chapter, I argue that Reasons accounts are genuinely threatened by contemporary psychology. In the second half of the paper I consider whether such threats (...)
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  41. Manuel Vargas (2011). Revisionist Accounts of Free Will: Origins, Varieties, and Challenges. In Robert Kane (ed.), Oxford Handbook on Free Will, 2nd Edition. Oxford UP.score: 27.0
    The present chapter is concerned with revisionism about free will. It begins by offering a new characterization of revisionist accounts and the way such accounts fit (or do not) in the familiar framework of compatibilism and incompatibilism. It then traces some of the recent history of the development of revisionist accounts, and concludes by remarking on some challenges for them.
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  42. Gregg Caruso (2013). Introduction: Exploring the Illusion of Free Will and Moral Responsibility. In Gregg D. Caruso (ed.), Exploring the Illusion of Free Will and Moral Responsibility. Lexington Books.score: 27.0
    This introductory chapter discusses the philosophical and scientific arguments for free will skepticism and their implications--including the debate between Saul Smilansky's "illusionism," Thomas Nadelhoffer's "disillusionism," Shaun Nichols' "anti-revolution," and the "optimistic skepticism" of Derk Pereboom, Bruce Waller, Tamler Sommers, and others.
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  43. Timothy Morton (2011). Objects as Temporary Autonomous Zones. Continent 1 (3):149-155.score: 27.0
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 149-155. The world is teeming. Anything can happen. John Cage, “Silence” 1 Autonomy means that although something is part of something else, or related to it in some way, it has its own “law” or “tendency” (Greek, nomos ). In their book on life sciences, Medawar and Medawar state, “Organs and tissues…are composed of cells which…have a high measure of autonomy.”2 Autonomy also has ethical and political valences. De Grazia writes, “In Kant's enormously influential moral philosophy, autonomy (...)
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  44. Benjamin Vilhauer (2008). Incompatibilism and Ontological Priority in Kant's Theory of Free Will. In Pablo Muchnik (ed.), Incompatibilism and Ontological Priority in Kant's Theory of Free Will.score: 27.0
    This paper concerns the role of the transcendental distinction between agents qua phenomena and qua noumena in Kant's theory of free will. It argues (1) that Kant's incompatibilism can be accommodated if one accepts the "ontological" interpretation of this distinction (i.e. the view that agents qua noumena are ontologically prior to agents qua phenomena), and (2) that Kant's incompatibilism cannot be accommodated by the "two-aspect" interpretation, whose defining feature is the rejection of the ontological priority of agents qua noumena. (...)
     
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  45. Christian Miller (forthcoming). Situationism and Free Will. In Griffith Meghan, Timpe Kevin & Levy Neil (eds.), Routledge Companion to Free Will. Routledge.score: 27.0
    This handbook article reviews the situationist movements in psychology and philosophy, before turning to possible implications for issues about free will and moral responsibility. Particular attention is paid to possible threats to reasons-responsiveness and to agency.
     
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  46. Harry G. Frankfurt (1971). Freedom of the Will and the Concept of a Person. Journal of Philosophy 68 (1):5-20.score: 24.0
    It is my view that one essential difference between persons and other creatures is to be found in the structure of a person's will. Besides wanting and choosing and being moved to do this or that, men may also want to have (or not to have) certain desires and motives. They are capable of wanting to be different, in their preferences and purposes, from what they are. Many animals appear to have the capacity for what I shall call "first-order (...)
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  47. Marcus Arvan (2013). A New Theory of Free Will. Philosophical Forum 44 (1):1-48.score: 24.0
    This paper shows that several live philosophical and scientific hypotheses – including the holographic principle and multiverse theory in quantum physics, and eternalism and mind-body dualism in philosophy – jointly imply an audacious new theory of free will. This new theory, "Libertarian Compatibilism", holds that the physical world is an eternally existing array of two-dimensional information – a vast number of possible pasts, presents, and futures – and the mind a nonphysical entity or set of properties that "read" that (...)
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  48. Peter van Inwagen (1983). An Essay on Free Will. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    "This is an important book, and no one interested in issues which touch on the free will will want to ignore it."--Ethics. In this stimulating and thought-provoking book, the author defends the thesis that free will is incompatible with determinism. He disputes the view that determinism is necessary for moral responsbility. Finding no good reason for accepting determinism, but believing moral responsiblity to be indubitable, he concludes that determinism should be rejected.
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  49. Peter van Inwagen (2008). How to Think About the Problem of Free Will. Journal of Ethics 12 (3/4):327 - 341.score: 24.0
    In this essay I present what is, I contend, the free-will problem properly thought through, or at least presented in a form in which it is possible to think about it without being constantly led astray by bad terminology and confused ideas. Bad terminology and confused ideas are not uncommon in current discussions of the problem. The worst such pieces of terminology are "libertarian free will" and "compatibilist free will." The essay consists partly of a defense of (...)
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  50. Peter van Inwagen (1975). The Incompatibility of Free Will and Determinism. Philosophical Studies 27 (March):185-99.score: 24.0
    In this paper I shall define a thesis I shall call 'determinism', and argue that it is incompatible with the thesis that we are able to act otherwise than we do (i.e., is incompatible with 'free will'). Other theses, some of them very different from what I shall call 'determinism', have at least an equal right to this name, and, therefore, I do not claim to show that every thesis that could be called 'determinism' without historical impropriety is incompatible (...)
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