Search results for 'Will History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Manuel Vargas (2010). The Revisionist Turn: A Brief History of Recent Work on Free Will. In Jesus Aguilar, Andrei Buckareff & Keith Frankish (eds.), New Waves in Philosophy of Action. Palgrave.score: 63.0
    I’ve been told that in the good old days of the 1970s, when Quine’s desert landscapes were regarded as ideal real estate and David Lewis and John Rawls had not yet left a legion of influential students rewriting the terrain of metaphysics and ethics respectively, compatibilism was still compatibilism about free will. And, of course, incompatibilism was still incompatibilism about free will. That is, compatibilism was the view that free will was compatible with determinism. Incompatibilism was the (...)
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  2. Thomas Pink & M. W. F. Stone (eds.) (2003). The Will and Human Action: From Antiquity to the Present Day. Routledge.score: 51.0
    What is the will? And what is its relation to human action? Throughout history, philosophers have been fascinated by the idea of "the will": the source of the drive that motivates human beings to act. However, there has never been a clear consensus as to what the will is and how it relates to human action. Some philosophers have taken the will to be based firmly in reason and rational choice, and some have seen it (...)
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  3. Laurie Shrage (2008). Will Philosophers Study Their History, Or Become History? Radical Philosophy Review 11 (2):125-150.score: 48.0
    This paper contends that philosophers should consult the work of intellectual historians, who write on the history of the social formation of philosophy in the U.S., in order to understand our past role in American society and our intellectual niche in the academy. By understanding the history of our field as a social and cultural phenomenon, and not as a set of ideas that transcend their human contexts, we will be in a better position to set a (...)
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  4. Susan Cartier Poland (2000). Genes, Patents, and Bioethics--Will History Repeat Itself? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 10 (3):265-281.score: 45.0
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  5. J. C. B. Gosling (1990). Weakness of the Will. Routledge.score: 42.0
    Weakness of the Will gives an excellent historical survey of philosophers' puzzles about the possibility of deliberately taking the worse course. Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics, a selection of medieval philosophers, and more contemporary philosophers are explored to illustrate why and how they avoid discussing the problem.
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  6. Risto Saarinen (1994). Weakness of the Will in Medieval Thought: From Augustine to Buridan. E.J. Brill.score: 42.0
    This book sets out to examine the medieval understanding of Aristotle's famous discussion of "weakness of the will" (akrasia, incontinentia) in the seventh book of his Nicomachean Ethics. The medieval views are outlined primarily on the basis of the commentaries on Aristotle's "Ethics by Albert the Great, Thomas Aquinas, Walter Burley, Gerald Odonis and John Buridan. An investigation of the earlier Augustinian discussion concerning reluctant actions (invitus facere) rounds out the study. The recent studies of weakness of the (...) have neglected the medieval philosophers. The present volume fills this gap in historical research and shows that especially the conceptual refinement of the fourteenth-century discussion makes contributions that are comparable to those of twentieth-century philosophers. (shrink)
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  7. Robert H. Kane (1999). New Directions on Free Will. In The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy, Volume 2: Metaphysics. Bowling Green: Philosophy Doc Ctr. 135-142.score: 42.0
    Libertarian or incompatibilist conceptions of free will (according to which free will is incompatible with determinism) have been under withering attack in the modern era of Western philosophy as obscure and unintelligible and have been dismissed as outdated by many twentieth century philosophers and scientists because of their supposed lack of fit with modern images of human beings in the natural and human sciences. In a recent book (The Significance of Free Will), I attempt to reconcile incompatibilist (...)
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  8. Jürgen Overhoff (2000). Hobbes's Theory of the Will: Ideological Reasons and Historical Circumstances. Rowman & Littlefield.score: 42.0
    In Hobbes's Theory of the Will, Jurgen Overhoff reveals the religious, ethical, and political consequences of Thomas Hobbes's doctrine of volition.
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  9. Steven M. Nadler (2001). Gersonides on Providence: A Jewish Chapter in the History of the General Will. Journal of the History of Ideas 62 (1):37-57.score: 39.0
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  10. Fritz J. McDonald (2014). Review of Heidi M. Ravven, The Self Beyond Itself: An Alternative History of Ethics, the New Brain Sciences, and the Myth of Free Will. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 7 (2):251-252.score: 39.0
    The Self Beyond Itself is a defense of an incompatibilist, hard determinist view of free will. Free will is here defined in a very strong sense, as the existence of actions that do not result from any causes other than the agent herself. The question of how to define free will, especially whether it consists in the ability to do otherwise, and what the ability to do otherwise amounts to, is not given much consideration in this book.Ravven (...)
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  11. John M. McDermott (1983). Love and Understanding: The Relation of Will and Intellect in Pierre Rousselot's Christological Vision. Università Gregoriana.score: 39.0
    Abridgement of thesis (doctoral)--Gregorian University, Rome.
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  12. Marco Menin (2013). 'Who Will Write the History of Tears?'History of Ideas and History of Emotions From Eighteenth-Century France to the Present. History of European Ideas:1-17.score: 39.0
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  13. James M. Petrik (1992). Descartes' Theory of the Will. Hollowbrook Pub..score: 39.0
     
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  14. Louis P. Pojman (1986). Religious Belief and the Will. Routledge & K. Paul.score: 39.0
     
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  15. Ilham Dilman (1999). Free Will: An Historical and Philosophical Introduction. Routledge.score: 36.0
    The debate between free will and its opposing doctrine, determinism, is one of the key issues in philosophy. Ilham Dilman brings together all the dimensions of the problem of free will with examples from literature, ethics and psychoanalysis, and draws out valuable insights from both sides of the freedom-determinism divide. The book provides a comprehensive introduction to this highly important question and examines the contributions made by sixteen of the most outstanding thinkers from the time of early Greece (...)
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  16. Paul Katsafanas (2011). The Relevance of History for Moral Philosophy: A Study of Nietzsche's Genealogy. In Simon May (ed.), Nietzsche's 'On the Genealogy of Morality': A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.score: 36.0
    The Genealogy takes a historical form. But does the history play an essential role in Nietzsche's critique of modern morality? In this essay, I argue that the answer is yes. The Genealogy employs history in order to show that acceptance of modern morality was causally responsible for producing a dramatic change in our affects, drives, and perceptions. This change led agents to perceive actual increases in power as reductions in power, and actual decreases in power as increases in (...)
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  17. Michelle Kosch (2006). Freedom and Reason in Kant, Schelling, and Kierkegaard. Oxford University Press.score: 36.0
    Michelle Kosch examines the conceptions of free will and the foundations of ethics in the work of Kant, Schelling, and Kierkegaard. She seeks to understand the history of German idealism better by looking at it through the lens of these issues, and to understand Kierkegaard better by placing his thought in this context. Kosch argues for a new interpretation of Kierkegaard's theory of agency, that Schelling was a major influence and Kant a major target of criticism, and that (...)
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  18. Victor Terras (1999). Anyone Contemplating to Write a Narrative History of a National Literature, That is, a Work Which is More Than a Mere Chronicle, Catalogue, or Collection of Articles, Loosely Connected by Their Subject, Will Face Several Questions. Empirically, Such Enterprise Would Seem to Presuppose, at Least, the Existence of a National Language and a Cultural Identity, as Well as, Almost Inevitably, a Certain Amount of Linkage to Political and Social History. In the Case of Russian Literature, All of These ... [REVIEW] Sign Systems Studies 27:271-291.score: 36.0
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  19. John Briscoe (1968). Hellenistic Political History Édouard Will: Histoire politique du monde hellénistique (323–30 av. J.-C.). Tome i: De la mort d'Alexandre aux avènements d'Antiochos III et de Philippe V. (Annales de l'Est, Mémoire no. 30.) Pp. 369. Nancy: Université, Faculté des Lettres, 1966. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 18 (01):80-82.score: 36.0
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  20. Mark Migotti (1984). Luther's Word on Man's Will: A Case Study in Comparative Intellectual History. Religious Studies 20 (4):657 - 667.score: 36.0
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  21. N. G. L. Hammond (1962). An Eclectic Greek History Stringfellow Barr: The Will of Zeus. A History of Greece From the Origins of Hellenic Culture to the Death of Alexander. Pp. Xvi+496, 31 Plates, 8 Maps. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1962. Cloth, 50s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 12 (03):262-264.score: 36.0
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  22. John Briscoe (1970). The Political History of Hellenistic World Édouard Will: Histoire politique du monde hellénistique (323–30 av. J.-C.) Tome ii: Des avènements d'Antiochus III et de Philippe V à la fin des Lagides. (Annales de l'Est, Mémoire 32.) Pp. 564. Nancy: Université, Faculté des Lettres, 1967. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 20 (03):371-374.score: 36.0
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  23. Victor Davis Hanson (2004). History Will Judge the Iraq War Just. Nexus 9:17.score: 36.0
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  24. Philip Niles (1998). Jeffrey L. Singman and Will McLean, Daily Life in Chaucer's England. (Daily Life Through History.) Westport, Conn., and London: Greenwood Press, 1995. Pp. Xiii, 253; Tables, Many Black-and-White Figures, and Musical Examples. [REVIEW] Speculum 73 (1):260-261.score: 36.0
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  25. Frederic E. Wakeman (1973). History and Will: Philosophical Perspectives of Mao Tse-Tung's Thought. Berkeley,University of California Press.score: 36.0
    1 The Revolutionary Founder Mao Tse-tung's singular prominence within the Chinese Communist Party was not quickly won. His share of leadership was secured ...
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  26. Alain Epp Weaver (2007). The Land, the Bible, and History: Toward the Land That I Will Show You - By Alain A.A. Marchadour and David S.J. Neuhaus. [REVIEW] Modern Theology 23 (4):645-648.score: 36.0
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  27. Alan S. Hawkesworth (1899). Book Review:Theories of the Will in the History of Philosophy. Archibald Alexander; Metaphysics. Borden P. Bowne. [REVIEW] Ethics 9 (2):266-.score: 36.0
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  28. Robert Bernasconi (2003). Will the Real Kant Please Stand Up-The Challenge of Enlightenment Racism to the Study of the History of Philosophy. Radical Philosophy 117:13-22.score: 36.0
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  29. John Briscoe (1976). Fifth-Century Greek History Edouard Will: Le Monde Grec Et L'Orient. Tome I: Le Ve Siècle (510–403). (Peuples Et Civilisations, Vol. Ii.) Pp. 716: 1 Folding Map, 5 Maps and Plans. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1972. Cloth, 80 Frs. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 26 (01):90-92.score: 36.0
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  30. J. Fogel (1974). History and Will: Philosophical Perspectives of Mao Tse-Tung's Thought. Telos 1974 (20):153-160.score: 36.0
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  31. Michel Foucault (1998). The Will to Knowledge: The History of Sexuality Vol. I. Penguin.score: 36.0
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  32. Francis G. Gentry (2007). Brian Murdoch, Ed., German Literature of the Early Middle Ages. (The Camden House History of German Literature, 2.) Woodbridge, Eng., and Rochester, N.Y.: Boydell and Brewer, 2004. Pp. Xiv, 283; Black-and-White Figures. $85.Will Hasty, Ed., German Literature of the High Middle Ages. (The Camden House History of German Literature, 3.) Woodbridge, Eng., and Rochester, N.Y.: Boydell and Brewer, 2006. Pp. Xi, 338; Black-and-White Figures. $90. [REVIEW] Speculum 82 (4):1021-1024.score: 36.0
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  33. Stephanie van Hover & Erika Pierce (2006). " Next Year Will Be Different:" Two First-Year History Teachers' Perceptions of the Impact of Virginia's Accountability Reform on Their Instructional Decision-Making. Journal of Social Studies Research 30 (2).score: 36.0
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  34. Esther Kroeker (2011). Terence Irwin's History of Ethics. Ch. 62: Reid: Action and Will. Philosophical Forum 62 (3):311-311.score: 36.0
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  35. Kathryn L. Lynch (2009). TE Hill,“She, This in Blak”: Vision, Truth, and Will in Geoffrey Chaucer's “Troilus and Criseyde.”(Studies in Medieval History and Culture.) New York and London: Routledge, 2006. Pp. Ix, 147. [REVIEW] Speculum 84 (3):731-733.score: 36.0
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  36. Friedrich Nietzsche (2010). How the "True World" Finally Became a Fable : The History of an Error : The Will to Power as Art. In Christopher Want (ed.), Philosophers on Art From Kant to the Postmodernists: A Critical Reader. Columbia University Press.score: 36.0
     
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  37. Arthur Stinner (2003). Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, 30 July–3 August 2003 The International History, Philosophy & Science Teaching Group is Holding its Seventh International Conference at the University of Winnipeg in Manitoba, Canada From Wednesday (Evening) 30 July to Sunday (Noon) 3 August 2003. Educators, Historians, Philosophers, Teachers, Scientists, and Cognitive Scientists From Over 30 Countries Will Engage with Theoretical, Curricular, and Pedagogical Issues In. [REVIEW] Science and Education 12:127-129.score: 36.0
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  38. Theodore R. Schatzki (2010). The Timespace of Human Activity: On Performance, Society, and History as Indeterminate Teleological Events. Lexington Books.score: 33.0
    The Timespace of Human Activity shows that a concept of activity timespace drawn from the work of Martin Heidegger Provides new insights into the nature of ...
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  39. Julian Young (1987). Willing and Unwilling: A Study in the Philosophy of Arthur Schopenhauer. Distributors, Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 33.0
    Chapter 1 Idealism § 1 Introduction Schopenhauer says that his philosophy grows out of Kant's, as from its "parent stem" (WR I p.501). ...
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  40. Margaret J. Osler (1994/2004). Divine Will and the Mechanical Philosophy: Gassendi and Descartes on Contingency and Necessity in the Created World. Cambridge University Press.score: 33.0
    This book is about the influence of varying theological conceptions of contingency and necessity on two versions of the mechanical philosophy in the seventeenth century. Pierre Gassendi (1592-1655) and Rene; Descartes (1596-1650) both believed that all natural phenomena could be explained in terms of matter and motion alone. They disagreed about the details of their mechanical accounts of the world, in particular about their theories of matter and their approaches to scientific method. This book traces their differences back to theological (...)
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  41. Maria De Cillis (2014). Free Will and Predestination in Iislamic Thought: Theoretical Compromises in the Works of Avicenna, Ghazali and Ibn Arabi. Routledge.score: 33.0
  42. Susanne Bobzien (2012). A Free Will: Origins of the Notion in Ancient Thought (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (2):292-293.score: 30.0
    Much of chapters 2 to 6 is in agreement with publications from the last twenty years (including those of the reviewer); so for example Frede’s points that neither Aristotle nor the Stoics had a notion of free-will; that in Epictetus (for the first time) the notions of freedom and will were combined; that an indeterminist notion of free-will occurs first in Alexander. The achievement of these chapters lies in the way Frede carefully joins them together and uses (...)
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  43. Manuel Vargas (2011). Revisionist Accounts of Free Will: Origins, Varieties, and Challenges. In Robert Kane (ed.), Oxford Handbook on Free Will, 2nd Edition. Oxford UP.score: 30.0
    The present chapter is concerned with revisionism about free will. It begins by offering a new characterization of revisionist accounts and the way such accounts fit (or do not) in the familiar framework of compatibilism and incompatibilism. It then traces some of the recent history of the development of revisionist accounts, and concludes by remarking on some challenges for them.
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  44. Alix A. Cohen (2008). Kant's Biological Conception of History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (1):1-28.score: 30.0
    The aim of this paper is to argue that Kant's philosophy of biology has crucial implications for our understanding of his philosophy of history, and that overlooking these implications leads to a fundamental misconstruction of his views. More precisely, I will show that Kant's philosophy of history is modelled on his philosophy of biology due to the fact that the development of the human species shares a number of peculiar features with the functioning of organisms, these features (...)
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  45. Carl Hammer (2008). Explication, Explanation, and History. History and Theory 47 (2):183–199.score: 30.0
    To date, no satisfactory account of the connection between natural-scientific and historical explanation has been given, and philosophers seem to have largely given up on the problem. This paper is an attempt to resolve this old issue and to sort out and clarify some areas of historical explanation by developing and applying a method that will be called “pragmatic explication” involving the construction of definitions that are justified on pragmatic grounds. Explanations in general can be divided into “dynamic” and (...)
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  46. Jeff Malpas (2011). Truth, Narrative, and the Materiality of Memory: An Externalist Approach in the Philosophy of History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (3-4):328-353.score: 30.0
    One of the most influential and significant developments in the philosophy of language over the last thirty years has been the rise of externalist conceptions of content. This essay aims to explore the implications of a form of externalism, largely derived from the work of Donald Davidson, for thinking about history, and in so doing to suggest one way in which contemporary philosophy of language may engage with contemporary philosophy of history. Much of the discussion focuses on the (...)
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  47. Simon Evnine (1993). Hume, Conjectural History, and the Uniformity of Human Nature. Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (4):589-606.score: 30.0
    In this paper I argue that, in at least two cases - his discussions of the temporal precedence o f polytheism over monotheism and of the origins of civil society - we see Hume consigning to historical development certain aspects of reason which, as a comparison with Locke will show, have sometimes been held to be uniform. In the first of these cases Hume has recourse to claims about the general historical development of human thought. In the second case, (...)
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  48. Ericka Tucker (2013). The Subject of History: Historical Subjectivity and Historical Science. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (2):205-229.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I show how the phenomenological and hermeneutic traditions and method converge on their treatment of the historical subject. Thinkers from both traditions claim that subjectivity is shaped by a historical worldview. Each tradition provides an account of how these worldviews are shaped, and thus how essentially historical subjective experience is molded. I argue that both traditions, although offering helpful ways of understanding the way history shapes subjectivity, go too far in their epistemic claims for the superiority (...)
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  49. Ian Hunter (2005). The State of History and the Empire of Metaphysics. History and Theory 44 (2):289–303.score: 30.0
    One of the curious things about this challenging book is that its ostensible subject— the Saxon medical and political scientist Hermann Conring (1606–1681)— is not mentioned in the title. Constantin Fasolt argues that we cannot know what Conring really thought or meant in his writings, which means that his topic cannot be Conring as such and must instead be that which occludes our knowledge of him, the titular limits of history. Given that we do in fact learn a good (...)
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  50. Marianne Sommer (2008). History in the Gene: Negotiations Between Molecular and Organismal Anthropology. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 41 (3):473 - 528.score: 30.0
    In the advertising discourse of human genetic database projects, of genetic ancestry tracing companies, and in popular books on anthropological genetics, what I refer to as the anthropological gene and genome appear as documents of human history, by far surpassing the written record and oral history in scope and accuracy as archives of our past. How did macromolecules become "documents of human evolutionary history"? Historically, molecular anthropology, a term introduced by Emile Zuckerkandl in 1962 to characterize the (...)
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