Search results for 'Will Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Florian Cova & Yasuko Kitano (2013). Experimental Philosophy and the Compatibility of Free Will and Determinism: A Survey. Annals of the Japan Association for Philosophy of Science:17-37.score: 198.0
    The debate over whether free will and determinism are compatible is controversial, and produces wide scholarly discussion. This paper argues that recent studies in experimental philosophy suggest that people are in fact “natural compatibilists”. To support this claim, it surveys the experimental literature bearing directly (section 1) or indirectly (section 2) upon this issue, before pointing to three possible limitations of this claim (section 3). However, notwithstanding these limitations, the investigation concludes that the existing empirical evidence seems to (...)
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  2. James A. Harris (2005). Of Liberty and Necessity: The Free Will Debate in Eighteenth-Century British Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 192.0
    The eighteenth century was a time of brilliant philosophical innovation in Britain. In Of Liberty and Necessity James A. Harris presents the first comprehensive account of the period's discussion of what remains a central problem of philosophy, the question of the freedom of the will. He offers new interpretations of contributions to the free will debate made by canonical figures such as Locke, Hume, Edwards, and Reid, and also discusses in detail the arguments of some less familiar (...)
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  3. Arthur Schopenhauer (1992). On the Will in Nature: A Discussion of the Corroborations From the Empirical Sciences That the Author's Philosophy has Received Since its First Appearance. Distributed in the U.S.A. And Canada by St. Martin's Press.score: 180.0
     
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  4. Manuel Vargas (2006). Philosophy and the Folk: On Some Implications of Experimental Work For Philosophical Debates on Free Will. Journal of Cognition and Culture 6 (1):239-254.score: 174.0
    I discuss experimental work by Nichols, and Nichols and Knobe, with respect to the philosophical problems of free will and moral responsibility. I mention some methodological concerns about the work, but focus principally on the philosophical implications of the work. The experimental results seem to show that in particular, concrete cases we are more willing to attribute responsibility than in cases described abstractly or in general terms. I argue that their results suggest a deep problem for traditional accounts of (...)
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  5. Margaret J. Osler (1994/2004). Divine Will and the Mechanical Philosophy: Gassendi and Descartes on Contingency and Necessity in the Created World. Cambridge University Press.score: 174.0
    This book is about the influence of varying theological conceptions of contingency and necessity on two versions of the mechanical philosophy in the seventeenth century. Pierre Gassendi (1592-1655) and Rene; Descartes (1596-1650) both believed that all natural phenomena could be explained in terms of matter and motion alone. They disagreed about the details of their mechanical accounts of the world, in particular about their theories of matter and their approaches to scientific method. This book traces their differences back to (...)
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  6. Tamler Sommers, Free Will and Experimental Philosophy: An Intervetion.score: 168.0
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  7. Arthur Berndtson (1942). The Problem of Free-Will in Recent Philosophy. Chicago, Ill..score: 168.0
     
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  8. Wahida Khandker (2013). The Idea of Will and Organic Evolution in Bergson's Philosophy of Life. Continental Philosophy Review 46 (1):57-74.score: 162.0
    The idea of the élan vital is crucial for an understanding of Bergson’s metaphysical method, underpinning the way in which philosophy stands with other forms of creative activity as an endeavour of “self-overcoming,” the self or subject no longer being at the centre of thought, but understood rather as a product of the process of thinking. In placing a special emphasis on Bergson’s 1907 work, Creative Evolution, the present essay is both an acknowledgement and challenge to the shift from (...)
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  9. Richard A. Watson (2007). Descartes's Ballet: His Doctrine of the Will and His Political Philosophy. St. Augustine's Press.score: 156.0
    Transcript and English translation of La naissance de la paix -- Analysis of La naissance de la paix -- Did Descartes write La naissance de la paix? -- Descartes's doctrine of the will -- The power of the will -- Controlling bodily desires -- Willing the good -- The sources of willing -- Did Descartes read Corneille? -- Descartes's political philosophy -- Evidence and methods of construction -- The sovereign state -- Descartes's life and politics -- Discours (...)
     
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  10. Tamler Sommers (2010). Experimental Philosophy and Free Will. Philosophy Compass 5 (2):199-212.score: 150.0
    This paper develops a sympathetic critique of recent experimental work on free will and moral responsibility. Section 1 offers a brief defense of the relevance of experimental philosophy to the free will debate. Section 2 reviews a series of articles in the experimental literature that probe intuitions about the "compatibility question"—whether we can be free and morally responsible if determinism is true. Section 3 argues that these studies have produced valuable insights on the factors that influence our (...)
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  11. Eddy Nahmias & Dylan Murray (2010). Experimental Philosophy on Free Will: An Error Theory for Incompatibilist Intuitions. In Jesus Aguilar, Andrei Buckareff & Keith Frankish (eds.), New Waves in Philosophy of Action. Palgrave-Macmillan. 189--215.score: 150.0
    We discuss recent work in experimental philosophy on free will and moral responsibility and then present a new study. Our results suggest an error theory for incompatibilist intuitions. Most laypersons who take determinism to preclude free will and moral responsibility apparently do so because they mistakenly interpret determinism to involve fatalism or “bypassing” of agents’ relevant mental states. People who do not misunderstand determinism in this way tend to see it as compatible with free will and (...)
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  12. Thom Brooks (2004). Hegel, Nietzsche, and Philosophy: Thinking Freedom by Will Dudley Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002, Pp. 326 + XVII. £45. [REVIEW] Philosophy 79 (1):149-153.score: 150.0
    This is a book review of Will Dudley, "Hegel, Nietzsche, and Philosophy".
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  13. Iain Thomson (2012). In the Future Philosophy Will Be Neither Continental nor Analytic but Synthetic: Toward a Promiscuous Miscegenation of (All) Philosophical Traditions and Styles. Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (2):191-205.score: 150.0
    In this paper, I suggest that the important philosophy of the future will increasingly be found neither in the “continental” nor in the “analytic” traditions but, instead, in the transcending sublation of (all) traditions I call “synthetic philosophy.” I mean “synthetic” both in a sense that encourages the bold combinatorial mélange of existing styles, traditions, and issues, and also in the Hegelian sense of sublating dichotomous oppositions, appropriating the distinctive insights of both sides while eliminating their errors (...)
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  14. Arati Barua (2008). Schopenhauer's Philosophy of Will and Sankara's Advaita Vedanta. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 8:23-29.score: 150.0
    It is a well established fact that Arthur Schopenhauer was the first major Western thinker who was so much influenced by the Upanishads that he wrote, "In the whole world there is no study so beneficial and so elevating as that of the Upanishads. It has been the solace of my life, it will be the solace of my death”. This view of Schopenhauer about the Upanishads not only shows his familiarity with the Eastern thought but also it reflects (...)
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  15. J. de Lucca (1979). Will Philosophy Bury Its Undertakers? Diogenes 27 (108):1-16.score: 150.0
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  16. Zbigniew Wendland (2007). What Will XXth Century Philosophy Carry Over Into the XXIst. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 11:137-142.score: 150.0
    The paper centers on philosophy's major trends and trials at the turn of the XXt h and XXIs t century, its leading idea is based on several basic assumptions which can be summarized as follows: 1) the title is a query after XXt h-century philosophy's main achievements and their usefulness in the XXIs t ; 2) speaking about philosophy's achievements, the author particularly means its critical role in condemning and de-mystifying evil, dispelling illusion and myth, and disclosing (...)
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  17. Shaun Nichols (2011). Experimental Philosophy and the Problem of Free Will. Science 331 (6023):1401-1403.score: 144.0
    Many philosophical problems are rooted in everyday thought, and experimental philosophy uses social scientific techniques to study the psychological underpinnings of such problems. In the case of free will, research suggests that people in a diverse range of cultures reject determinism, but people give conflicting responses on whether determinism would undermine moral responsibility. When presented with abstract questions, people tend to maintain that determinism would undermine responsibility, but when presented with concrete cases of wrongdoing, people tend to say (...)
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  18. A. Favell (1998). Applied Political Philosophy at the Rubicon: Will Kymlica's Multicultural Citizenship. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 1 (2):255-278.score: 144.0
    Will Kymlicka's Multicultural Citizenship represents an extraordinary attempt to put applied political philosophy to work in the empirical context of contemporary political debates about immigration and ethnic minorities in western society. This paper explores the methodological and interpretative difficulties of combining normative and empirical goals, in a critical discussion of the examples Kymlicka makes of multicultural issues in France, Britain and the US. It goes on to argue that these weaknesses lie in the Rawlsian influence in Kymlicka's work, (...)
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  19. Matthew R. Dasti & Edwin F. Bryant (eds.) (2014). Free Will, Agency, and Selfhood in Indian Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 144.0
    If one were to make a list of the leading topics of debate in classical Indian philosophy, contenders might include the existence and nature of the self; the fundamental sources of knowledge; the nature of the engagement between consciousness and reality; the existence and nature of God/Brahman; the proper account of causation; the relationship between language and the world; the practices that best ensure future happiness; the most expedient method for any soteriological attainment (or not); or the fundamental constituents (...)
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  20. Paul Russell & Oisin Deery (eds.) (2013). The Philosophy of Free Will: Essential Readings From the Contemporary Debates. Oxford University Press.score: 144.0
    This collection provides a selection of the most essential contributions to the contemporary free will debate. Among the issues discussed and debated are skepticism and naturalism, alternate possibilities, the consequence argument, libertarian metaphysics, illusionism and revisionism, optimism and pessimism, neuroscience and free will, and experimental philosophy.
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  21. Astrida Orle Tantillo (2002). The Will to Create: Goethe's Philosophy of Nature. University of Pittsburgh Press.score: 138.0
    This makes The Will to Create accessible to a wide audience, including philosophers, historians of science, and literary theorists, as well as general readers.
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  22. John Martin Fischer (ed.) (2005). Free Will: Critical Concepts in Philosophy. Routledge.score: 138.0
    Over the last three decades there has been a tremendous amount of philosophical work in the Anglo-American tradition on the cluster of topics pertaining to Free Will. Of course, this work has in many instances built on and extended the historical treatments of this great area of philosophical interest. The issues range from fairly abstract philosophical questions about the logic of arguments about human freedom (and its relationship to prior predictability of our choices and actions, or God's foreknowledge, or (...)
     
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  23. Robert P. Farrell (2000). Will the Popperian Feyerabend Please Step Forward: Pluralistic, Popperian Themes in the Philosophy of Paul Feyerabend. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 14 (3):257 – 266.score: 132.0
    John Preston has claimed that we must understand Paul Feyerabend's later, post-1970, philosophy in terms of a disappointed Popperianism: that Feyerabend became a sceptical, relativistic, literal anarchist because of his perception of the failure of Popper's philosophy. I argue that this claim cannot be supported and trace the development of Feyerabend's philosophy in terms of a commitment to the central Popperian themes of criticism and critical explanatory progress. This commitment led Feyerabend to reject Popper's specific methodology in (...)
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  24. William James (1979). The Will to Believe and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy. Harvard University Press.score: 132.0
    This is the sixth volume to be published in The Works of William James, an authoritative edition sponsored by the American Council of Learned Societies.
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  25. Bela Szabados & Eldon Soifer (1999). Hypocrisy, Change of Mind, and Weakness of Will: How to Do Moral Philosophy with Examples. Metaphilosophy 30 (1&2):60-78.score: 132.0
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  26. Frederick Olafson (1991). Nietzsche's Philosophy of Culture: A Paradox in the Will to Power. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (3):557-572.score: 132.0
    I examine Nietzsche's concept of a nihilism of strength\nand the relationship in which it stands to the kind of\nvital self-assertion that he admired in archaic\naristocracies. What is new in Nietzsche's nihilism of\nstrength is a self-awareness that was lacking in the past\nand that would enable a fully autonomous human being to\nrecognize the "being" he imposes on "becoming" as the\nexpression of his own will to power. I show that this idea\nleads to serious incoherencies in Nietzsche's account of\nthis new kind of strength (...)
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  27. Vincent Blok (2013). Towards the Rehabilitation of the Will in Contemporary Philosophy. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 44 (3):286-301.score: 132.0
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  28. Paul Ricœur (1965). Philosophy of the Will. Chicago, Regnery.score: 132.0
    v. 2. Finitude and guilt. Bk. 1. Fallible man.
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  29. Günter Zöller (1998). Fichte's Transcendental Philosophy: The Original Duplicity of Intelligence and Will. Cambridge University Press.score: 132.0
    This is the first book in English on the major works of the German philosopher Johann Gottlieb Fichte (1762-1814). It examines the transcendental theory of self and world from the writings of Fichte's most influential period (1794-1800), and considers in detail recently discovered lectures on the Foundations of Transcendental Philosophy. At the center of that body of work stands Fichte's attempt to integrate the theories of volition and cognition into a unified but complex 'system of freedom'. The focus of (...)
     
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  30. Moral Willing & As Narrative (2010). It is No Easy Job to Situate a Discus-Sion of the Will Within Anthropology, Which is Perhaps Why the Editors of This Volume Chose the Title They Did. It is a Subject Some of Us Might Want to Move Toward, but There is No Sense of Arrival. Even the Paths Toward It Are Dauntingly Elusive. One is Either Faced with Too Much Relevant Literature or Too Little. On the Too Little Side, There has Been Scant Explicit Consideration of Willing as a Cultural Phenomenon, in Contrast to Philosophy and Psychology Where ... [REVIEW] In Keith M. Murphy & C. Jason Throop (eds.), Toward an Anthropology of the Will. Stanford University Press. 50.score: 128.0
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  31. Merold Westphal (1973). Prolegomena to Any Future Philosophy of Religion Which Will Be Able to Come Forth as Prophecy. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 4 (3):129 - 150.score: 126.0
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  32. David Wiggins (2005). An Idea We Cannot Do Without: What Difference Will It Make (Eg. To Moral, Political and Environmental Philosophy) to Recognize and Put to Use a Substantial Conception of Need? Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 80 (57):25-.score: 126.0
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  33. Nancy Cartwright (2012). Presidential Address: Will This Policy Work for You? Predicting Effectiveness Better: How Philosophy Helps. Philosophy of Science 79 (5):973-989.score: 126.0
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  34. Benjamin Hill (2008). Of Liberty and Necessity: The Free Will Debate in Eighteenth-Century British Philosophy (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (4):pp. 646-647.score: 126.0
  35. Julie Walsh (2009). Descartes's Ballet: His Doctrine of the Will and His Political Philosophy (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (1):pp. 139-141.score: 126.0
  36. Adam Feltz (2012). Pereboom and Premises: Asking the Right Questions in the Experimental Philosophy of Free Will. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (1):53-63.score: 126.0
    Sommers (2010) argues that experimental philosophers of free will have largely been asking the wrong question – the question whether philosophically naïve individuals think that free will and moral responsibility are compatible with determinism. The present studies begin to alleviate this concern by testing the intuitive plausibility of Pereboom’s (2001) four case argument. The general pattern of responses from two experiments does not support Pereboom’s predictions. Moreover, those who were high in the personality trait emotional stability tended to (...)
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  37. Alan Richardson (2005). Reichenbach's Disease and Mirowski's Theory of Knowledge? Or, Will to Power as Philosophy of Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 36 (4):744-753.score: 126.0
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  38. Christopher Coope (2009). The Doctor of Philosophy Will See You Now. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 84 (65):177-.score: 126.0
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  39. Judith Norman (2002). The Logic of Longing: Schelling's Philosophy of Will. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (1):89 – 107.score: 126.0
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  40. Joey Bonner (1979). The World as Will: Wang Kuo-Wei and the Philosophy of Metaphysical Pessimism. Philosophy East and West 29 (4):443-466.score: 126.0
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  41. Andrew Bowie (2000). Fichte's Transcendental Philosophy. The Original Duplicity of Intelligence and Will by Günter Zöller Cambridge University Press, 1998, ISBN 0-521-59160-0 (Hb) £30. [REVIEW] Philosophy 75 (2):296-312.score: 126.0
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  42. Walter E. Broman (1989). Milton and Free Will: An Essay in Criticism and Philosophy (Review). Philosophy and Literature 13 (1):179-180.score: 126.0
  43. Neal Ward Gilbert (1963). The Concept of Will in Early Latin Philosophy. Journal of the History of Philosophy 1 (1):17-35.score: 126.0
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  44. Daniel Breazeale (1999). Fichte's Transcendental Philosophy: The Original Duplicity of Intelligence and Will (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (2):374-376.score: 126.0
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  45. E. S. Water House (1932). The Mystic Will. Based on a Study of the Philosophy of Jacob Boehme. By Howard H. Brinton, Ph.D. With an Introduction by Rufus M. Jones, M.A., D.Litt. (London: George Allen and Unwin Ltd. 1931. Pp. Xiii + 269. Price 8s. 6d. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 7 (25):114-.score: 126.0
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  46. Jeanette Kennett & Michael Smith (1994). Philosophy and Commonsense: The Case of Weakness of Will. In. In John O'Leary-Hawthorne & Michaelis Michael (eds.), Philosophy in Mind. Kluwer. 141--157.score: 126.0
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  47. S. S. L. (1927). The Story of Philosophy. The Lives and Opinions of the Greater Philosophers. By Will Durant Ph.D. (London: Ernest Benn, Ltd. 1926. Pp. Xiii + 586. Price, 25s.)Comparative Philosophy. By Paul Masson-Oursel . With an Introduction by F. G. Crookshank, M.D. (London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner and Co., Ltd. 1926. Pp. 212. Price 10s. 6d. International Library of Psychology, Philosophy and Scientific Method.)Philosophy of the Recent Past. An Outline of European and American Philosophy Since 1860. By Ralph Barton Perry . (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. 1926. Pp. Viii + 230. Price 10s. 6d.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 2 (07):407-.score: 126.0
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  48. T. E. Jessop (1933). Freedom of Will. By N. O. Lossky , Professor of Philosophy in the Russian University of Prague. Translated by Natalie Duddington . (London: Williams & Norgate. 1932. [REVIEW] Philosophy 8 (29):115-.score: 126.0
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  49. Hope K. Fitz (2005). Nietzche\'s Philosophy of the Will to Power a Kind of Elan Vital and Creative Expression. Dialogue and Universalism 15 (5-6):43-54.score: 126.0
    In this paper I argue that, for Nietzsche, the will to power is a kind of élan vital, i.e., vital impulse, force or drive. In living creatures, it is a drive to express their natures. In human beings, it is complex and must be developed in stages. The initial stages include becoming independent and striving for freedom of spirit and expression. Of the few that achieve the last stage, some will become the Übermensch or superior persons who (...) achieve great creative acts and in so doing enhance the capabilities of all humans. Nietzsche spoke as if he were one of the free spirits, but implicit in his writings is the idea that he is an exemplar of the Übermensch. (shrink)
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  50. Stephen P. Schwartz (1993). The Status of Nietzsche's Theory of the Will to Power in the Light of Conremporary Philosophy of Science. International Studies in Philosophy 25 (2):85-92.score: 126.0
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