15 found
Sort by:
  1. William A. Phillips (2013). In Neural Systems. In Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic Raffaela Giovagnoli (ed.), Computing Nature. 7--61.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. William A. Phillips (2013). Neuronal Inference Must Be Local, Selective, and Coordinated. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (3):222-223.
    Life is preserved and enhanced by coordinated selectivity in local neural circuits. Narrow receptive-field selectivity is necessary to avoid the curse-of-dimensionality, but local activities can be made coherent and relevant by guiding learning and processing using broad coordinating contextual gain-controlling interactions. Better understanding of the functions and mechanisms of those interactions is therefore crucial to the issues Clark examines.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. William A. Phillips (2013). The Coordination of Probabilistic Inference in Neural Systems. In. In Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic Raffaela Giovagnoli (ed.), Computing Nature. 61--70.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. William A. Phillips (2004). Belief in the Primacy of Fantasy is Misleading and Unnecessary. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):802-803.
    We can live in fantasy only if we survive in reality. Visual experience that carries information about the real world – that is, normal perception – serves that goal. Normal perception is not merely constrained hallucination, and it can usually be distinguished from internally generated images, with which it is rarely confused. Modulatory processes, such as attention, do indeed affect most levels of perceptual processing, but they do so without invalidating the transmission of the signals that they modulate.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. William A. Phillips & Steven M. Silverstein (2004). Unity and Diversity in Disorders of Cognitive Coordination. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):594-599.
    Studies of aging and autism as outlined by Bertone, Mottron, & Faubert (Bertone et al.) and by Faubert & Bertone suggest that disorders of cognitive coordination involving impairments of dynamic gestalt grouping and context-sensitivity may be common to several different disorders. We agree that such studies may shed light on these processes and their neuronal bases. However, we also emphasize that dynamic grouping and context-sensitivity can fail in various ways, and that, although the underlying pathophysiology may often involve NMDA-receptor malfunction, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Steven M. Silverstein & William A. Phillips (2004). Distinguishing Schizophrenia From the Mechanisms Underlying Hallucinations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):805-806.
    This commentary challenges the argument that the diathesis for hallucinations is equivalent to that for schizophrenia. Evidence against this comes from data on the prevalence of hallucinations in schizophrenia, their nonspecificity, and their relationships with moderating variables. We also highlight, however, the manner in which the Behrendt & Young (B&Y) hypothesis extends recent neuroscientific theories of schizophrenia, and its potential treatment applications.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. William A. Phillips (2003). The Short-Term Dynamics Within a Network of Connections is Creative. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):752-753.
    Although visual long-term memory (VLTM) and visual short-term memory (VSTM) can be distinguished from each other (and from visual sensory storage [SS]), they are embodied within the same modality-specific brain regions, but in very different ways: VLTM as patterns of connectivity and VSTM as patterns of activity. Perception and VSTM do not “activate” VLTM. They use VLTM to create novel patterns of activity relevant to novel circumstances.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. William A. Phillips & Steven M. Silverstein (2003). Convergence of Biological and Psychological Perspectives on Cognitive Coordination in Schizophrenia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):65-82.
    The concept of locally specialized functions dominates research on higher brain function and its disorders. Locally specialized functions must be complemented by processes that coordinate those functions, however, and impairment of coordinating processes may be central to some psychotic conditions. Evidence for processes that coordinate activity is provided by neurobiological and psychological studies of contextual disambiguation and dynamic grouping. Mechanisms by which this important class of cognitive functions could be achieved include those long-range connections within and between cortical regions that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. William A. Phillips & Steven M. Silverstein (2003). Convergence of Perspectives on Cognitive Coordination in Schizophrenia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):63-135.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. William A. Phillips (2002). A Signpost on the Road to Molecular Psychology. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (11):489-490.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. William A. Phillips (2001). Contextual Modulation and Dynamic Grouping in Perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (3):95-97.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. William A. Phillips (2001). Synchronization: Making Sense of the Data. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (7):285.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Roger J. Watt & William A. Phillips (2000). The Function of Dynamic Grouping in Vision. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (12):447-454.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. William A. Phillips (1997). Theories of Cortical Computation. In M. D. Rugg (ed.), Cognitive Neuroscience. Mit Press. 11--46.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. William A. Phillips & Wolf Singer (1997). In Search of Common Foundations for Cortical Computation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):657-683.
    It is worthwhile to search for forms of coding, processing, and learning common to various cortical regions and cognitive functions. Local cortical processors may coordinate their activity by maximizing the transmission of information coherently related to the context in which it occurs, thus forming synchronized population codes. This coordination involves contextual field (CF) connections that link processors within and between cortical regions. The effects of CF connections are distinguished from those mediating receptive field (RF) input; it is shown how CFs (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation