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William Day [11]William R. Day [1]
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Profile: William Day (Le Moyne College)
  1. William Day (2012). Zhenzhi and Acknowledgment in Wang Yangming and Stanley Cavell. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (2):174-191.
    This article highlights sympathies between Wang Yangming's notion of zhenzhi (real knowing) and Stanley Cavell's concept of acknowledgment. I begin by noting a problem in interpreting Wang on the unity of knowing and acting, which leads to considering how our suffering pain figures in our “real knowing” of another's pain. I then turn to Cavell's description of a related problem in modern skepticism, where Cavell argues that knowing another's pain requires acknowledging it. Cavell's concept of acknowledgment answers to Wang's insistence (...)
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  2. William Day (2011). I Don't Know, Just Wait: Remembering Remarriage in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. In David LaRocca (ed.), The Philosophy of Charlie Kaufman. University Press of Kentucky.
    "In 'I Don't Know, Just Wait: Remembering Remarriage in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind', William Day shows how Kaufman's Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind should be considered part of the film genre known as remarriage comedy; but he also shows how Kaufman contributes something new to the genre. Day addresses, in particular, how the conversation that is the condition for reunion involves discovering 'what it means to have memories together as a way of learning how to be together'. (...)
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  3. William Day (2010). Appendix: A Page Concordance for Unnumbered Remarks in Philosophical Investigations. In William Day & Víctor J. Krebs (eds.), Seeing Wittgenstein Anew. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  4. William Day (2010). The Ends of Improvisation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (3):291-296.
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  5. William Day (2010). Wanting to Say Something: Aspect-Blindness and Language. In William Day & Víctor J. Krebs (eds.), Seeing Wittgenstein Anew. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  6. William Day & Victor J. Krebs (2010). Introduction: Seeing Aspects in Wittgenstein. In William Day & Víctor J. Krebs (eds.), Seeing Wittgenstein Anew. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  7. William Day & Víctor J. Krebs (eds.) (2010). Seeing Wittgenstein Anew. Cambridge University Press.
    Seeing Wittgenstein Anew is the first collection to examine Ludwig Wittgenstein's remarks on the concept of aspect-seeing, showing that it was not simply one more topic of investigation in Wittgenstein's later writings but rather a pervasive and guiding concept in his efforts to turn philosophy's attention to the actual conditions of our common life in language. The essays in this volume open up novel paths across familiar fields of thought: the objectivity of interpretation, the fixity of the past, the acquisition (...)
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  8. William R. Day (2003). Alan M. Stahl, Zecca: The Mint of Venice in the Middle Ages. Baltimore and London: Johns Hopkins University Press, in Association with the American Numismatic Society, 2000. Pp. Xv, 497; 25 Black-and-White Figures, Graphs, Tables, and 7 Maps. [REVIEW] Speculum 78 (2):602-605.
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  9. William Day (2001). Gustaaf Van Cromphout, Emerson's Ethics:Emerson's Ethics. Ethics 111 (4):830-832.
  10. William Day (2000). Knowing as Instancing: Jazz Improvisation and Moral Perfectionism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (2):99-111.
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  11. William Day (1997). Roger Scruton, A Short History of Modern Philosophy: From Descartes to Wittgenstein Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 17 (5):371-372.
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  12. William Day (1995). Moonstruck, or How to Ruin Everything. Philosophy and Literature 19 (2):292-307.
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