99 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
William Dembski [75]William A. Dembski [24]
  1. William Dembski, Why Joe Schmoe Doesn't Buy Evolution.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. William Dembski, DARWIN'S MELTDOWN -- Cover Story Http://Www.Worldmag.Com/World/Issue/04-03- 04/Home.Asp.
    Cover story: WORLD ASKED FOUR leaders of the Intelligent Design Movement to have some fun: Imagine writing in 2025, on the 100th anniversary of the famous Scopes "monkey" trial, and explain how Darwinism has bit the dust, unable to rebut the evidence that what we see around us could not have arisen merely by time plus chance.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. William A. Dembski, Addicted to Caricatures: A Response to Brian Charlesworth.
    One prominent evolutionist I know confided in me that he sometimes spends only an hour perusing a book that he has to review. I doubt if Brian Charlesworth spent even that much time with my book No Free Lunch. Charlesworth is a bright guy and could have done better. But no doubt he is also a busy guy. To save time and effort, it's therefore easier to put these crazy intelligent design creationists in their place rather than actually engage the (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. William A. Dembski, Becoming a Disciplined Science: Prospects, Pitfalls, and Reality Check for ID.
    Recently I asked a well-known ID sympathizer what shape he thought the ID movement was in. I raised the question because, after some initial enthusiasm on his part three years ago, his interest seemed to have flagged. Here is what he wrote: An enormous amount of energy has been expended on "proving" that ID is bogus, "stealth creationism," "not science," and so on. Much of this, ironically, violates the spirit of science. The proof of the pudding is in the eating. (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. William A. Dembski, Books in Review.
    In Nonzero Robert Wright argues convincingly that certain patterns in biological and cultural evolution cannot properly be attributed to contingency or accident but rather point to an underlying teleology—for him, a fully naturalized teleology. Most teleologies of the past have looked to some entity or principle beyond the strictly material and physical. Bossuet’s universal history guided by providence, Hegel’s phenomenology of spirit, Bergson’s élan vital, and Teilhard de Chardin’s omega point —all invoked quasi–mystical elements. Wright wants none of this. (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. William A. Dembski, By William A. Dembski.
    I have before me a letter dated January 5, 2000 from Bradford Wilson, the executive director of the NAS. It begins, “I really enjoyed your contribution to the recent symposium in the January issue of First Things, so much so that I’ve also decided to invite you to join the NAS. Many of your fellow contributors including Robert George, Jeffrey Satinover, and Father Neuhaus are among our current members, and I think you’d find it well worth your while if you (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. William A. Dembski, Dealing with the Backlash Against Intelligent Design.
    Why is that? The stakes are now considerably higher. Darwinism: Science or Philosophy? is the proceedings of a symposium that took place at Southern Methodist University in the spring of 1992. The focus of that symposium was Phillip Johnson’s then recently published book Darwin on Trial. At the time, Johnson was a novelty -- a respected professor of criminal law at Cal Berkeley who was raising doubts about evolution. All harmless, good fun, no doubt. And Berkeley has an illustrious history (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. William A. Dembski, Elliott Sober's Independent Evidence Requirement for Design.
    In his paper "The Design Argument," Elliott Sober predicts that "human beings will eventually build organisms from nonliving materials."[1] In that case, we could obtain clear evidence that certain organisms resulted from intelligent design whereas earlier we might have thought they were due to a Darwinian process. I consider a similar possibility in chapter 6 of No Free Lunch.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. William A. Dembski, Naturalism's Argument From Invincible Ignorance: A Response to Howard Van Till.
    Howard Van Till's review of my book No Free Lunch exemplifies perfectly why theistic evolution remains intelligent design's most implacable foe. Not only does theistic evolution sign off on the naturalism that pervades so much of contemporary science, but it justifies that naturalism theologically -- as though it were unworthy of God to create by any means other than an evolutionary process that carefully conceals God's tracks.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. William A. Dembski, Not Taking Information Seriously Enough By.
    In Pandemonium Tremendum, James Huchingson takes as his starting point that scientific theories and technologies supply crucial metaphors for theological inquiry. Moreover, since the defining theory and technology of our age is respectively information theory and the computer, Huchingson focuses here for theological inspiration. Specifically, Huchingson attempts to frame a theological metaphysics in information-theoretic terms.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. William A. Dembski, Random Predicate Logic I: A Probabilistic Approach to Vagueness.
    Predicates are supposed to slice reality neatly in two halves, one for which the predicate holds, the other for which it fails. Yet far from being razors, predicates tend to be dull knives that mangle reality. If reality is a tomato and predicates are knives, then when these knives divide the tomato, plenty of mush remains unaccounted for. Of course some knives are sharper than others, just as some predicates are less vague than others. “x is water” is certainly sharper (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. William A. Dembski, Science and Design.
    When the physics of Galileo and Newton displaced the physics of Aristotle, scientists tried to explain the world by discovering its deterministic natural laws. When the quantum physics of Bohr and Heisenberg in turn displaced the physics of Galileo and Newton, scientists realized they needed to supplement their deterministic natural laws by taking into account chance processes in their explanations of our universe. Chance and necessity, to use a phrase made famous by Jacques Monod, thus set the boundaries (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. William A. Dembski, Skepticism's Prospects for Unseating Intelligent Design.
    Talk delivered at CSICOP's Fourth World Skeptics Conference in Burbank, California, 21 June 2002, at a discussion titled "Evolution and Intelligent Design." The participants included ID proponents William Dembski and Paul Nelson as well as evolutionists Wesley Elsberry and Kenneth Miller. Massimo Pigliucci moderated the discussion.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. William A. Dembski, The Act of Creation: Bridging Transcendence and Immanence.
    "Sing, O Goddess, the anger of Achilles son of Peleus, that brought countless ills upon the Achaeans." In these opening lines of the Iliad, Homer invokes the Muse. For Homer the act of creating poetry is a divine gift, one that derives from an otherworldly source and is not ultimately reducible to this world. This conception of human creativity as a divine gift pervaded the ancient world, and was also evident among the Hebrews. In Exodus, for instance, we read that (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. William A. Dembski, Three Frequently Asked Questions About Intelligent Design.
    Intelligent design is the science that studies how to detect intelligence. Recall astronomer Carl Sagan’s novel Contact about the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (or SETI). Sagan based the SETI researchers’ methods of design detection on scientific practice. Real-life SETI researchers have thus far failed to detect designed signals from distant space. But if they encountered such a signal, as the astronomers in Sagan’s novel did, they too would infer design. Intelligent design research currently focuses on developing reliable methods of design (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. William A. Dembski, The Gift of Purpose.
    No one lives in a cocoon. Instead, the world constantly invades our lives. In response, we give purpose to these invasions. The image, here, is that of a pearl. What is the purpose of a pearl? The pearl is the oyster’s gift to a grain of sand that gets inside the oyster and disturbs it. Of all the gifts we can give, the greatest is the gift of purpose. It is the pearl of great price. All other gifts are ornaments (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. William A. Dembski, The Intelligent Design Movement.
    According to Darwinism, undirected natural causes are solely responsible for the origin and development of life. In particular, Darwinism rules out the possibility of God or any guiding intelligence playing a role in life's origin and development. Within western culture Darwinism's ascent has been truly meteoric. And yet throughout its ascent there have always been dissenters who regarded as inadequate the Darwinian vision that undirected natural causes could produce the full diversity and complexity of life.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. William A. Dembski, The Rise and Fall of Baylor University’s Michael Polanyi Center.
    letter by Antony Flew indicating his willingness to defend the center’s academic freedom). There is also material presented here that was not made public during the height of the controversy surrounding the center, including the original planning..
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. William A. Dembski, The Reach of the Cross.
    I want this morning to reflect with you on the Cross of Jesus. In first Corinthians, the Apostle Paul makes a remarkable claim about the Cross. He writes: I, brethren, when I came to you, came not with excellency of speech or of wisdom, declaring unto you the testimony of God. For I determined not to know any thing among you, save Jesus Christ, and him crucified. 1 Cor 2:1-2 (KJV) Why did the Apostle Paul, in coming to the Corinthians, (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. William A. Dembski, Why President Bush Got It Right About Intelligent Design By.
    Wisdom -- because he understands that ideas are best taught not by giving them a monopoly (which is how evolutionary theory is currently presented in all high school biology textbooks) but by being played off against well-supported competing ideas.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. William Dembski, An Analysis of Homer Simpson and Stephen Jay Gould.
    Note: The Simpson's, television's popular prime-time cartoon known for its satirical commentary on various social issues, recently took a shot at the creation-evolution debate by featuring Stephen Jay Gould prominently in one of its episodes. Here is Bill Dembski's review and observations of that episode.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. William Dembski, Alchemy, NK Boolean Style.
    At Home in the Universe. According to the modified joke, Kauffman's method is to begin any scientific investigation with the statement "Consider an NK Boolean network." Indeed, throughout At Home in the Universe just about every real-world problem gets translated into a toy-world problem involving NK Boolean networks. As with Carnap's formal languages, NK Boolean networks have the advantage of complete logical precision. But they also suffer the disadvantage of losing touch with reality. And it is this disadvantage which ultimately (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. William Dembski, A Primer on Probability for Design Inferences.
    Probabilities are numbers between 0 and 1 that attach to events. Events always occur with respect to a reference class of possibilities. Consider a die with faces 1 through 6. The reference class of possibilities in this case can be represented by the set {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6}. Any subset of this reference class then represents an event. For instance, the event Eodd, i.e., “an odd number was tossed,” corresponds to {1, 3, 5}. Such an event is said (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. William Dembski, Asking the Tough Questions.
    When the Athenian court convicted Socrates for subverting the youth of Athens, he was given the option of proposing an appropriate punishment for his misdeeds. Since Socrates was convinced not merely of his innocence but also of his good worth, he proposed that Athens "punish" him by honoring him as a city benefactor. This proposed punishment did not set well with the Athenian court. Had Socrates proposed exile, he probably would have lived. As it was, his proposal earned him a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. William Dembski, Biology in the Subjunctive Mood: A Response to Nicholas Matzke.
    On October 11, 2003, the Talk Reason website posted an article by Nicholas Matzke titled "Evolution in (Brownian) Space: A Model for the Origin of the Bacterial Flagellum" (http://www.talkreason.org/articles/flagellum.cfm). Talk Reason advertises itself as a website that presents a collection of articles which aim to defend genuine science from numerous attempts by the new crop of creationists to replace it with theistic pseudo-science under various disguises and names." The most obvious target here is intelligent design. Indeed, Matzke's article attempts to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. William Dembski, Because It Works. That's Why!
    Richard Feynman once remarked that unless one is able to make one's ideas understandable to college freshmen, one doesn't really understand them. On the other hand, when asked by a reporter to explain why he was awarded the Nobel Prize, Feynman remarked, "Listen buddy, if I could explain it in fifty words or less, it wouldn't be worth a Nobel Prize.".
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. William Dembski, Can Functional Logic Take the Place of Intelligent Design? A Response to Walter Thorson.
    Walter Thorson's two articles on the legitimacy and scope of naturalism within science attempt to identify a mediating position between the reductive naturalism of thinkers like Richard Dawkins and the complete rejection of naturalism by thinkers like Phillip Johnson. Thorson rightly notes that the purely mechanistic approach to science characteristic of reductive naturalism is inadequate. Nonetheless, he argues that science still needs naturalism as a methodological or regulative principle. Thorson's methodological naturalism leaves room for teleology in nature, though a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. William Dembski, Challenging Materialism's "Chokehold" on Neuroscience.
    In the epilogue to The Mind and the Brain , we read: "Finally, after a generation or more in which biological materialism has had neuroscience -- indeed, all the life sciences -- in a chokehold, we may at last be breaking free.... Biological materialism did and does have real-world consequences. We feel its reach every time a pharmaceutical company tells us that, to cure shyness (or "social phobia"), we need only reach for a little pill.... Biological materialism is nothing if (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. William Dembski, Conway Morris's Solution.
    A review of Simon Conway Morris, Life’s Solution: Inevitable Humans in a Lonely Universe (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003), 486 pp., $30, $19.99. Appeared as “Everything that Rises Must Converge,” Books & Culture (Nov/Dec 2004): 42.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. William Dembski, Commentary on Eugenie Scott and Glenn Branch's "Guest Viewpoint: 'Intelligent Design' Not Accepted by Most Scientists," 7/2/02. [REVIEW]
    The National School Boards Association enlisted Eugenie Scott and Glenn Branch to criticize intelligent design bullet point fashion. Here I want to respond to these bullet-point assertions. I would repeat the entire article, but copyright restrictions prevent me. The article is available at http://nsba.org/sbn/02-jul/070202-8.htm.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. William Dembski, Christian Theodicy in Light of Genesis and Modern Science.
    Simon Blackburn, a Cambridge philosopher, begins his book Being Good by contrasting our physical environment with our moral environment. He defines our moral environment as “the surrounding climate of ideas about how to live.”1 Though we cannot help but be aware of our physical environment, we are often oblivious of our moral environment. Yet, even when largely invisible, our moral environment is always deeply influential. According to Blackburn.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. William Dembski, Design by Elimination Vs. Design by Comparison.
    Behind this question are two fundamentally different approaches about how to reason with chance hypotheses. One approach, due to Ronald Fisher, rejects a chance hypothesis provided sample data appear in a prespecified rejection region. The other, due to Thomas Bayes, rejects a chance hypothesis provided an alternative hypothesis confers a bigger probability on the data in question than the original hypothesis. In the Fisherian approach, chance hypotheses are rejected in isolation for rendering data too improbable. In the Bayesian approach, chance (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. William Dembski, Disbelieving Darwin--And Feeling No Shame!
    Science, we are told, is tentative. And given the history of science, there is every reason for science to be tentative. No scientific theory withstands revision for long, and many are eventually superseded by theories that flatly contradict their predecessors. Scientific revolutions are common, painful, and real. New theories regularly overturn old ones, and no scientific theory is ever the final word.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. William Dembski, Detecting Design in the Natural Sciences by William A. Dembski [Word Count: 2106].
    How a designer gets from thought to thing is, at least in broad strokes, straightforward: (1) A designer conceives a purpose. (2) To accomplish that purpose, the designer forms a plan. (3) To execute the plan, the designer specifies building materials and assembly instructions. (4) Finally, the designer or some surrogate applies the assembly instructions to the building materials.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. William Dembski, Does Evolution Even Have a Mechanism?
    Evolutionary biology teaches that all biological complexity is the result of material mechanisms. These include principally the Darwinian mechanism of natural selection and random variation, but also include other mechanisms (symbiosis, gene transfer, genetic drift, the action of regulatory genes in development, self-organizational processes, etc.). These mechanisms are just that: mindless material mechanisms that do what they do irrespective of intelligence. To be sure, mechanisms can be programmed by an intelligence. But any such intelligent programming of evolutionary mechanisms is not (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. William Dembski, Darwin's Predictable Defenders: A Response to Massimo Pigliucci by William A. Dembski.
    Some Darwinists keep their Darwinism close to the vest. Others wear it on their sleeves. Massimo Pigliucci has it tattooed on his forehead. Indeed, his "Darwin Day" celebrations at the University of Tennessee have become an annual orgy of self-congratulation before Darwin's idol.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. William Dembski, Does the Design Argument Show There is a God? William A. Dembski.
    Suppose you take a tour of the Louvre, that great museum in Paris housing one of the finest art collections in the world. As you walk through the museum, you come across a painting by someone named Leonardo da Vinci -- the Mona Lisa . Suppose this is your first exposure to da Vinci -- you hadn't heard of him or seen the Mona Lisa before. What could you conclude? Certainly you could conclude that da Vinci was a consummate (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. William Dembski, Evolution as Alchemy.
    In its heyday alchemy was a comprehensive theory of transmutation describing not only transformations of base into precious metals but also transformations of the soul up and down the great chain of being. Alchemy was not just a physics but also a metaphysics. Alchemy as metaphysics attracts interest to this day, as in Carl Jung's writings about the soul and personal identity. As he noted, "The alchemists sought for that effect which would heal not only the disharmonies of the physical (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. William Dembski, Evolutionary Logic.
    Since the neo-Darwinian synthesis of the 1930s, evolutionary biology has become a growth industry. This growth has resulted in the demand for more flexible methods of establishing evolutionary biology's grandiose claims than the laborious, difficult, pedantic, and "rigorous" methods favored throughout the rest of the sciences. This demand has been met by what is now a well-developed branch of evolutionary biology known as evolutionary logic.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. William Dembski, Evolution's Logic of Credulity: An Unfettered Response to Allen Orr.
    Allen Orr wrote an extended critical review (over 6000 words) of my book No Free Lunch for the Boston Review this summer (http://bostonreview.mit.edu/BR27.3/orr.html). The Boston Review subsequently contacted me and asked for a 1000 word response. I wrote a response of that length focusing on what I took to be the fundamental flaw in Orr's review (and indeed in Darwinian thinking generally, namely, conflating the realistically possible with the merely conceivable). What I didn't know (though I should have expected it) (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. William Dembski, Evolution of Biological Information.
    National Cancer Institute, Frederick Cancer Research and Development Center, Laboratory of Experimental and Computational Biology, PO Box B, Frederick, MD 21702-1201, USA..
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. William Dembski, Fitness Among Competitive Agents: A Brief Note.
    The upshot of the No Free Lunch theorems is that averaged over all fitness functions, evolutionary computation does no better than blind search (see Dembski 2002, ch 4 as well as Dembski 2005 for an overview). But this raises a question: How does evolutionary computation obtain its power since, clearly, it is capable of doing better than blind search? One approach is to limit the fitness functions (see Igel and Toussaint 2001). Another, illustrated in David Fogel’s work on automated checker (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. William Dembski, Five Questions Evolutionists Would Rather Dodge.
    For instance, Oxford biologist Richard Dawkins accuses those who refuse to accept evolution with being “ignorant, stupid or insane (or wicked, but I’d rather not consider that).” To this he recently added: “I don’t withdraw a word of my initial statement. But I do now think it may have been incomplete. There is perhaps a fifth category, which may belong under ‘insane’ but which can be more sympathetically characterized by a word like tormented, bullied, or brainwashed.”.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. William Dembski, Foreword to Ben Wiker's Book.
    According to John Maynard Keynes, great intellectual and cultural movements frequently trace back to thinkers who worked in obscurity and are now long forgotten. Of course, the converse also holds. Great intellectual and cultural movements are often also associated with thinkers who worked in the public eye and remain wildly popular. Some thinkers are both famous and influential. Others are only influential.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. William Dembski, =====Foreword to How Blind is the Watchmaker?=====.
    For many critics of intelligent design, it is inconceivable that someone once properly exposed to Darwin's theory could doubt it. It is as though Darwin's theory were one of Descartes's clear and distinct ideas that immediately impels assent. Thus for design theorists to oppose Darwin's theory requires some hidden motivation, like wanting to shore up traditional morality or being a closet fundamentalist.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. William Dembski, Gauging Intelligent Design's Success.
    Proponents of intelligent design have been remarkably successful, at least in the United States, in creating a cultural movement. They have also been remarkably successful at exasperating a scientific and intellectual world that dismisses intelligent design as the latest incarnation of creationism—more sophisticated than previous incarnations to be sure, but with many of the old faults. In this paper I want to focus on intelligent design’s merits as an intellectual project. I will show that the questions it raises are legitimate (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. William Dembski, Hume, Reid, and Signs of Intelligence.
    David Hume’s critique of intelligent design is vastly overrated. Nevertheless, his critique, especially at the hands of his contemporary disciples, has been highly effective at shutting down discussion about design. I want here to review Hume’s critique, indicate how modern disciples have updated it, and then describe the response to Hume by his contemporary Thomas Reid. That response in my view is decisive. Would that more philosophers studied it. Hume did not demolish design. Reid demolished Hume.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. William Dembski, Information as a Measure of Variation.
    In many applications of information theory, information measures the reduction of uncertainty that results from the knowledge that an event has occurred. Even so, an item of information learned need not be the occurrence of an event but, rather, the change in probability distribution associated with an ensemble of events. This paper examines the basic account of information, which focuses on events, and reviews how it may be naturally generalized to probability distributions/measures. The resulting information measure is special case of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. William Dembski, ID as a Theory of Technological Evolution.
    In Book II of the Physics Aristotle remarks, “If the ship-building art were in the wood, it would produce the same results by nature.” Aristotle is here contrasting nature and art. Nature provides the raw materials (here wood); art provides the means for fashioning those materials (here into a ship). For Aristotle, art consists in the knowledge and skill to produce an object and presupposes the imposition of form on the object from outside. On the other hand, nature consists in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. William Dembski, Irreducible Complexity Revisited.
    Michael Behe’s concept of irreducible complexity, and in particular his use of this concept to critique Darwinism, continues to come under heavy fire from the biological community. The problem with Behe, so Darwinists inform us, is that he has created a problem where there is no problem. Far from constituting an obstacle to the Darwinian mechanism of random variation and natural selection, irreducible complexity is thus supposed to be eminently explainable by this same mechanism. But is it really? It’s been (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 99