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  1. William F. Vallicella (forthcoming). Hugh McCann on the Implications of Divine Sovereignty in Advance. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly.
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  2. William F. Vallicella (2014). Hugh McCann on the Implications of Divine Sovereignty. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 88 (1):149-161.
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  3. William F. Vallicella (2014). Existence: Two Dogmas of Analysis. In Daniel D. Novotny Lukas Novak (ed.), Neo-Aristotelian Perspectives in Metaphysics. Routledge. 45-75.
    Analytic philosophy of existence in the 20th century and beyond has been dominated by two central claims. One is that existence is instantiation. The other is that there are no modes of existence. This article attempts to refute both claims.
     
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  4. William F. Vallicella (2013). Constituent Versus Relational Ontology (a Review of Metaphysics: Aristotelian, Scholastic, Analytic). Studia Neoaristotelica 10 (1):99-115.
    This review article explores in a critical spirit the differences between constituent and relational ontology as practiced by four contemporary Aristotelian philosophers, Michael J. Loux, E. J. Lowe, Lukáš Novák, and Stanislav Sousedík.
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  5. William F. Vallicella (2010). Gaskin on the Unity of the Proposition. Dialectica 64 (2):265-277.
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  6. William F. Vallicella, Divine Simplicity. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  7. William F. Vallicella (2006). Can the Chariot Take Us to the Land of No Self? The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 9:29-33.
    This paper examines a famous argument for the Buddhist doctrine of anatta ("no self) according to which nothing possesses self-nature or substantial reality. The argument unfolds during a debate between the monk Nagasena and King Milinda (Menandros). Nagasena's challenge to the King is that he demonstrate the substantial reality of the chariot in which he arrived at their meeting when said chariot is (i) not identical to any one of its proper parts, (ii) not identical to the mereological sum of (...)
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  8. William F. Vallicella (2005). &Quot;does Existence Itself Exist? Transcendental Nihilism Meets the Paradigm Theory&Quot;. In Larry Lee Blackman (ed.), The Philosophy of Panayot Butchvarov: A Collegial Evaluation. The Edwin Mellen Press. 57-78.
     
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  9. William F. Vallicella (2004). Kant Chastened But Vindicated. Faith and Philosophy 21 (1):98-104.
  10. William F. Vallicella (2003). A Tension in Quine's Theory of Existence. Philo 6 (2):193-204.
    According to Quine, the ontological question can be posed in three Anglo-Saxon monosyllables: “What is there?” But if we call this the ontological question, what shall we call the logically prior question: “What is it for an item to be there?” Peter van Inwagen has recently suggested that this be called the meta-ontological question, and more importantly, has endorsed Quine’s answer to it. Ingredient in this Quinean answer to the meta-ontological question are several theses, among them, “Being is the same (...)
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  11. William F. Vallicella (2003). The Problem of Existence by Arthur Witherall. Philo 6 (1):176-188.
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  12. William F. Vallicella, Keith Burgess-Jackson, Philip E. Devine, John Pepple & Michael Kelly (2003). Letters to the Editor. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 77 (2):85 - 87.
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  13. William F. Vallicella (2002). Incarnation and Identity. Philo 5 (1):84-93.
    The characteristic claim of Christianity, as codified at Chalcedon, is that God the Son, the second person of the Trinity, is numerically the same person as Jesus of Nazareth. This article raises three questions that appear to threaten the coherence of orthodox Chalcedonian incarnationalism. First, how can one person exemplify seemingly incompatible natures? Second, how can one person exemplify seemingly incompatible non-nature properties? Third, how can there be one person if the concept of incarnation implies that one person incarnates himself (...)
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  14. William F. Vallicella (2002). No Self? International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (4):453-466.
    Central to Buddhist thought and practice is the anattā doctrine. In its unrestricted form the doctrine amounts to the claim that nothing at all possesses self-nature. This article examines an early Buddhist argument for the doctrine. The argument, roughly, is that (i) if anything were a self, it would be both unchanging and self-determining; (ii) nothing has both of these properties; therefore, (iii) nothing is a self. The thesis of this article is that, despite the appearance of formal validity, the (...)
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  15. William F. Vallicella (2002). Relations, Monism, and the Vindication of Bradley's Regress. Dialectica 56 (1):3–35.
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  16. William F. Vallicella (2002). The Creation–Conservation Dilemma and Presentist Four-Dimensionalism. Religious Studies 38 (2):187-200.
    On traditional theism, God is not only a creator but also a conserver. The doctrine of conservation, however, appears to face a dilemma. Either conservation is continuous re-creation with consequences inimical to diachronic identity, or conservation is an operation upon a pre-existent entity, which, because it is pre-existent, is in no clear need of conservation. This article first makes a case for the dilemma, and then proposes a way between its horns. Safe passage is possible if we adopt presentist four-dimensionalism, (...)
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  17. William F. Vallicella (2001). Brentano on Existence. History of Philosophy Quarterly 18 (3):311-327.
  18. William F. Vallicella (2000). Could the Universe Cause Itself to Exist? Philosophy 75 (4):604-612.
    This article responds to Quentin Smith's, ‘The Reason the Universe Exists is that it Caused Itself to Exist’, Philosophy 74 (1999), 579–586. My rejoinder makes three main points. The first is that Smith's argument for a finitely old, but causally self-explanatory, universe fails from probative overkill: if sound, it also shows that all manner of paltry event-sequences are causally self-explanatory.The second point is that the refutation of Smith's argument extends to Hume's argument for an infinitely old causally self-explanatory universe, as (...)
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  19. William F. Vallicella (2000). Does the Cosmological Argument Depend on the Ontological? Faith and Philosophy 17 (4):441-458.
    Does the cosmological argument (CA) depend on the ontological (OA)? That depends. If the OA is an argument “from mere concepts,” then no; if the OA is an argument from possibility, then yes. That is my main thesis. Along the way, I explore a number of subsidiary themes, among them, the nature of proof in metaphysics, and what Kant calls the “mystery of absolute necessity.”.
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  20. William F. Vallicella (2000). From Facts to God: An Onto-Cosmological Argument. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 48 (3):157-181.
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  21. William F. Vallicella (2000). Three Conceptions of States of Affairs. Noûs 34 (2):237–259.
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  22. William F. Vallicella (1999). A Most Unlikely God: A Philosophical Enquiry Into the Nature of God Barry Miller Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 1996, Viii + 175 Pp., $27.00. [REVIEW] Dialogue 38 (03):614-.
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  23. William F. Vallicella (1999). A Most Unlikely God. Dialogue 38 (3):614-616.
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  24. William F. Vallicella (1999). God, Causation and Occasionalism. Religious Studies 35 (1):3-18.
    The doctrine that there are no logically necessary connections in nature can be used to support both occasionalism, according to which God alone can be a cause, and 'anti-occasionalism', according to which God cannot be a cause. Quentin Smith has recently invoked the 'no logically necessary connections in nature' doctrine in support of the latter. I bring two main objections against his thesis that God (logically) cannot be a cause. The first is that there are good reasons to think that (...)
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  25. William F. Vallicella (1998). Could a Classical Theist Be a Physicalist? Faith and Philosophy 15 (2):160-180.
    Since physicalism is fashionable nowadays, one should perhaps not be too surprised to find a growing number of theistic philosophers bent on combining theism with physicalism. I shall be arguing that this is an innovation we have good reason to resist. I begin by distinguishing global physicalism (physicalism about everything) from local physicalism (physicalism about human beings). I then present the theist who would be a physicalist with a challenge: Articulate a version of local physicalism that allows some minds to (...)
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  26. William F. Vallicella (1997). Bundles and Indiscernibility: A Reply to o’Leary-Hawthorne. Analysis 57 (1):91–94.
  27. William F. Vallicella (1997). On an Insufficient Argument Against Sufficient Reason. Ratio 10 (1):76–81.
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  28. William F. Vallicella (1997). The Hume-Edwards Objection to the Cosmological Argument. Journal of Philosophical Research 22:423-443.
    One sort of cosmological argument for the existence of God starts from the fact that the universe exists and argues to a transcendent cause of this fact. According to the Hume-Edwards objection to this sort of cosmological argument, if every member of the universe is caused by a preceding member, then the universe has an intemal causal explanation in such a way as to obviate the need for a transcendent cause. The Hume-Edwards objection has recently come under attack by atheists (...)
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  29. William F. Vallicella (1995). Do Individuals Exist? Journal of Philosophical Research 20:195-220.
    Is there room for a metaphysics of existence above and beyond the logic of ‘exists’? This paper defends an affirmative answer. It takes its point of departure from a recent polemic of Paul Edwards against Heidegger. According to Edwards, following Frege and Russell, Heidegger mistakenly assumes that existence belongs to individuals. I argue that although Heidegger does indeed make this assumption, he is not mistaken in so doing. My main concern, however, is neither to defend Heidegger nor to reply to (...)
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  30. William F. Vallicella (1995). Existence and Indefinite Identifiability. Southwest Philosophy Review 11 (2):171-186.
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  31. William F. Vallicella (1994). On Property Self-Exemplification. Faith and Philosophy 11 (3):478-481.
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  32. William F. Vallicella (1993). Has the Ontological Argument Been Refuted? Religious Studies 29 (1):97 - 110.
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  33. William F. Vallicella & Martin Andic (1992). Book Review. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 32 (1):61-64.
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  34. William F. Vallicella (1991). Reply to Davies. International Philosophical Quarterly 31 (2):213-225.
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  35. William F. Vallicella (1991). Reply to Smith. International Philosophical Quarterly 31 (3):343-348.
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  36. William F. Vallicella (1990). Reply to Zimmerman. International Philosophical Quarterly 30 (2):245-254.
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  37. William F. Vallicella (1990). Two Faces of Theism. Idealistic Studies 20 (3):238-257.
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  38. William F. Vallicella (1989). A Note on Hintikka's Refutation of the Ontological Argument. Faith and Philosophy 6 (2):215-217.
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  39. William F. Vallicella (1986). The Basic Problems of Phenomenology. International Studies in Philosophy 18 (1):80-81.
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  40. William F. Vallicella (1985). Heidegger's Reduction of Being to Truth. New Scholasticism 59 (2):156-176.
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  41. William F. Vallicella (1984). Relativism, Truth and the Symmetry Thesis. The Monist 67 (3):452-466.
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  42. William F. Vallicella (1983). Kant, Heidegger, and the Problem of the Thing in Itself. International Philosophical Quarterly 23 (1):35-43.
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  43. William F. Vallicella (1976). Review Article : Sokolowski on Husserl: From the Metaphysical to the Tautological Interpretation: Review of Robert Sokolowski, Husserlian Meditations (Evanston: North Western University Press, 1974) 289 Pages. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Social Criticism 4 (1):93-106.
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