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William C. Gay [22]William Gay [12]
  1. William Gay, A Normative Framework for Addressing Peace and Related Global Issues.
    Plato said that as long as wisdom and power, or philosophy and politics, are separated, “there can be no rest from troubles.”1 In The Republic, he sought to forge such a union. For over two millennia, from Plato through John Rawls, philosophers have put forward models for the just state.2 Despite these ongoing efforts, W. B. Gallie contends, “No political philosopher has ever dreamed of looking for the criteria of a good state viz-à-viz [sic] other states.”3 I will argue that (...)
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  2. William Gay, Bush’s National Security Strategy.
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  3. William Gay, Concerned Philosophers for Peace.
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  4. William C. Gay, Bush's National Security Strategy: A Critique of United States'.
    Many individuals domestically and internationally who strive for peace and justice are concerned about the new National Security Strategy issued by the George W. Bush Administration in September 2002. 1 William Galston, for example, writes in a recent issue of Philosophy and Public Policy Quarterly: A global strategy based on the new Bush doctrine of preemption means the end of the system of international institutions, laws and norms that we have worked to build for more than a half a (...)
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  5. William C. Gay, The New Reign of Terror: The Politics of Defining Weapons of Mass Destruction and Terrorism.
    “It was the best of times. It was the worst of times.” So begins Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities. While he was writing about London and Paris during the turbulent times associated with the rise of the British Industrial Revolution and the French Political Revolution, these lines express the current sentiments of many Americans. Before 11 September 2001, many people thought we were living in the best of times. Baby boomers were relishing in the prospects that through inheritance (...)
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  6. William Gay, Apocalyptic Thinking Versus Nonviolent Action.
    Throughout the Cold War, we heard public cries that nuclear war would destroy us. Many citizens rejected the governmentally crafted myth of protection. They did not believe in the 1960s that a fallout shelter boom or in the 1980s that a star wars boom would protect them from the big boom. Instead, they thought the Big Boom would bring on global doom. Currently, we are hearing our initial post-Cold War version of the myth of protection. This time the star wars (...)
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  7. William Gay, Democracy in Market Economies.
    The Cold War has ended and the post-Cold War world is often presented as one in which democracy and market economies are victorious. Francis Fukuyama goes so far as to claim that democratic politics has triumphed on a global scale.[ii] At least from a statistical point of view, most nations now declare themselves to be democracies, and a majority of the global population lives in these countries.[iii] However, the claim that the West won the Cold War too easily occludes recognition (...)
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  8. William Gay, Marxism and Global Values.
    The dissolution of the Soviet Union has initiated important questions concerning the nature and future of Marxism. This essay will examine the future of Marxism in relation to global values, specifically in relation to what is termed “Western” Marxism (non-Soviet or non-Orthodox Marxism).
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  9. William Gay, Nuclear Warfare and Morality.
    In each decade of the nuclear age, philosophers have provided critical reflections on the nature, use, and consequences of nuclear weapons. Frequently, these reflections have addressed the morality of producing, testing, deploying, and using nuclear weapons. Already, these philosophical reflections have passed through four phases and are now entering a fifth phase. The first phase stretches from the atomic bombing of Hiroshima to the above ground nuclear tests at Bikini Atoll. From the initial use of atomic weapons in 1945 to (...)
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  10. William Gay, The Language of War and Peace.
    linguistic alienation: the situation in which individuals cannot understand a discourse in their own language because of the use of highly technical vocabularies. linguistic violence: the situation in which individuals are hurt or harmed by words. negative peace: the temporary absence of active war or the lull between wars. positive peace: the negation of war and the presence of justice. warist discourse: language which takes for granted that wars are inevitable, justifiable, and winnable.
     
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  11. William C. Gay, Ricoeur on Metaphor and Ideology.
    arguments concerning whether such changes are creative. [2] Less frequently addressed are questions about how to assess the perceptual implications of these linguistic innovations. [3] Using insights of Ricoeur and, to a lesser extent, M. Merleau Ponty and V. N. Volosinov, I will provide a model for evaluating a certain class of linguistic innovations, namely, new uses of language which rely upon distortion of typical perceptual associations. (Excluded from such new linguistic uses are, for example, analogical innovations, as presented by (...)
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  12. William C. Gay, The Reality of Linguistic Violence Against Women.
    Hannah Arendt says that "violence is nothing more than the most flagrant manifestation of power."[1] Given this definition, one might expect that violence takes many forms. Numerous writers have, in fact, applied violence to more than direct bodily harm. Within philosophy, Newton Garver, for example, has developed a typology of violence that includes overt and covert forms, as well as personal..
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  13. Alexander N. Chumakov, Ivan I. Mazour & William C. Gay (eds.) (2014). Global Studies Encyclopedic Dictionary. Editions Rodopi.
    This book provides brief expositions of the central concepts in the field of Global Studies. Former President of the Soviet Union Mikhail Gorbachev says, “The book is intelligent, rich in content and, I believe, necessary in our complex, turbulent, and fragile world.” 300 authors from 50 countries contributed 450 entries. The contributors include scholars, researchers, and professionals in social, natural, and technological sciences. They cover globalization problems within ecology, business, economics, politics, culture, and law. This interdisciplinary collection provides a basis (...)
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  14. William C. Gay (2001). Conversations with Russian Philosophers: The Importance of Dialogue in Political Philosophy. In Laura Duhan Kaplan (ed.), Philosophy and Everyday Life. Seven Bridges Press. 75.
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  15. William Gay, Bing‐Yu Zhang & Ning Zhong (2001). Computability of Solutions of the Korteweg‐de Vries Equation. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 47 (1):93-110.
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  16. William C. Gay (1997). Nonsexist Public Discourse And Negative Peace. The Acorn 9 (1):45-53.
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  17. William Gay (1996). Bourdieu and the Social Conditions of Wittgensteinian Language Games. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 11 (1):15-21.
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  18. William C. Gay (1994). From Wittgenstein to Applied Philosophy. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 9 (1):15-20.
    I stumbled into my interpretation of Wittgenstein as an advocate of what is now termed applied philosophy. In doing research for an essay on linguistic violence, [2] I decided to read more by and about Ferrucio Rossi Landi because I had already made use of his work on linguistic alienation. [3] One source, in particular, caught my attention because of its clever, though sexist, subtitle. In 1991, Ranjit Chatterjee published an essay titled "Rossi Landi's Wittgenstein: 'A philosopher's meaning is his (...)
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  19. William C. Gay & T. A. Alekseeva (eds.) (1994). On the Eve of the 21st Century: Perspectives of Russian and American Philosophers. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  20. William C. Gay (1989). Gregory J. Walters, Karl Jaspers and the Role of'Conversion'in the Nuclear Age Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 9 (2):81-83.
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  21. William C. Gay (1987). Nuclear Discourse and Linguistic Alienation. Journal of Social Philosophy 18 (2):42-49.
  22. William C. Gay & Marysia Lemmond (1987). A Bibliography on Philosophy and the Nuclear Debate. Journal of Social Philosophy 18 (2):50-60.
  23. William C. Gay (1982). Myths About Nuclear War: Misconceptions in Public Belefs and Governmental Plan. Philosophy and Social Criticism 9 (2):116-144.
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  24. Charles E. Ziegler, Zenovia A. Sochor, William C. Gay, Jeremiah P. Conway, Philip Moran & Irving H. Anellis (1982). Reviews. [REVIEW] Studies in East European Thought 23 (2):141-186.
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  25. William Gay (1980). Justification of Legal Authority: Phenomenology Vs Critical Theory. Journal of Social Philosophy 11 (2):1-10.
  26. William C. Gay (1979). Merleau-Ponty on Language and Social Science: The Dialectic of Phenomenology and Structuralism. [REVIEW] Man and World 12 (3):322-338.
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  27. William C. Gay (1979). Short Review. Human Studies 2 (1):279-283.
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  28. William C. Gay (1978). Probability in the Social Sciences: A Critique of Weber and Schutz. [REVIEW] Human Studies 1 (1):16 - 37.
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  29. William C. Gay (1976). Action Versus Society: The Significance of Weber and Marx in the Intellectual History of the Social Disciplines. Philosophy and Social Criticism 4 (1):1-23.
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  30. William C. Gay & Paul Eckstein (1975). Bibliographic Guide to Hermeneutics and Critical Theory. Philosophy and Social Criticism 2 (4):379-390.
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  31. Edward M. Swiderski, William C. Gay & T. J. Blakeley (1975). Reviews. [REVIEW] Studies in East European Thought 15 (1):89-91.
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  32. William Gay (1895/1978). Walt Whitman, His Relation to Science and Philosophy. Norwood Editions.
     
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  33. William C. Gay, The Practice of Linguistic Nonviolence.
    Does language do violence, and, if so, can linguistic violence be overcome? Language can do violence if violence does not require the exercise of physical force, and linguistic violence can be overcome if its use can be avoided. Some forms of violence do not use physical force, and various means are available for avoiding linguistic violence. Hence, although linguistic violence can and does occur, it also can be overcome. Much of my recent work has focused on how language, which does (...)
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