Search results for 'William H. Starbuck' (try it on Scholar)

4 found
Sort by:
  1.  6 DLs
    William H. Starbuck (2006). The Production of Knowledge: The Challenge of Social Science Research. OUP Oxford.score: 960.6
    Bill Starbuck has been one of the leading management researchers over several decades. In this book he reflects on a number of challenges associated with management and social science research - the search for a 'behavioral science', the limits of rationality, the unreliability of many research findings, the social shaping of research agendas, cultures and judgements. It is an engaging, autobiographical account in which he discusses some of his own research and various methodological debates.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2.  0 DLs
    William H. Starbuck (2005). Learning by Knowledgeintensive Firms. In Nico Stehr & Reiner Grundmann (eds.), Knowledge: Critical Concepts. Routledge 3--6.score: 870.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3.  17 DLs
    E. H. Hollands, R. W. Sellars, A. W. Moore, B. H. Bode, E. S. Ames, G. D. Walcott, Edwin D. Starbuck, J. M. Mecklin, H. B. Alexander, V. T. Thayer, R. C. Lodge, Ellsworth Faris & Edward L. Schaub (1917). The Seventeenth Annual Meeting of the Western Philosophical Association. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 14 (15):403-414.score: 240.4
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4.  3 DLs
    David Hay (1999). Psychologists Interpreting Conversion: Two American Forerunners of the Hermeneutics of Suspicion. History of the Human Sciences 12 (1):55-72.score: 24.0
    Because of the importance of Puritanism in its history, one of the forms taken by religious Angst at the end of the 19th century in New England was uneasiness about the psychological nature and validity of the conversion experience. Apart from William James and G. Stanley Hall, the leading psychologists who investigated this phenomenon were Edwin Starbuck and James Leuba. Each had a different personal stance with regard to the plausibility of religious belief. In practice their differences of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation