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  1. William J. FitzPatrick (2015). Debunking Evolutionary Debunking of Ethical Realism. Philosophical Studies 172 (4):883-904.
    What implications, if any, does evolutionary biology have for metaethics? Many believe that our evolutionary background supports a deflationary metaethics, providing a basis at least for debunking ethical realism. Some arguments for this conclusion appeal to claims about the etiology of the mental capacities we employ in ethical judgment, while others appeal to the etiology of the content of our moral beliefs. In both cases the debunkers’ claim is that the causal roles played by evolutionary factors raise deep epistemic problems (...)
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  2. William Joseph FitzPatrick (2004). Ethical Pluralism Without Complementarity. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 47 (2):181-188.
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  3. William J. FitzPatrick (2005). The Practical Turn in Ethical Theory: Korsgaard's Constructivism, Realism, and the Nature of Normativity. Ethics 115 (4):651-691.
  4.  23
    William J. FitzPatrick (2008). Moral Responsibility and Normative Ignorance: Answering a New Skeptical Challenge. Ethics 118 (4):589-613.
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  5. William J. FitzPatrick (2009). Recent Work on Ethical Realism. Analysis 69 (4):746-760.
    Introduction: characterizing ethical realismIt is useful to begin a survey of recent work on ethical realism with a look at current disputes over what makes a theory of ethics count as ‘realist’ in the first place. Nearly all characterizations of ethical realism include some version of the following two core claims: Ethical discourse is assertoric and descriptive: ethical claims purport to state ethical facts by attributing ethical properties to people, actions, institutions, etc., and are thus true or false depending on (...)
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  6. William J. FitzPatrick (2009). Thomson's Turnabout on the Trolley. Analysis 69 (4):636-643.
    The famous ‘trolley problem’ began as a simple variation on an example given in passing by Philippa Foot , involving a runaway trolley that cannot be stopped but can be steered to a path of lesser harm. By switching from the perspective of the driver to that of a bystander, Judith Jarvis Thomson showed how the case raises difficulties for the normative theory Foot meant to be defending, and Thomson compounded the challenge with further variations that created still more puzzles (...)
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  7.  67
    William J. FitzPatrick (2012). The Doctrine of Double Effect: Intention and Permissibility. Philosophy Compass 7 (3):183-196.
    The Doctrine of Double Effect (DDE) is an influential non-consequentialist principle positing a role for intention in affecting the moral permissibility of some actions. In particular, the DDE focuses on the intend/foresee distinction, the core claim being that it is sometimes permissible to bring about as a foreseen but unintended side-effect of one’s action some harm it would have been impermissible to aim at as a means or as an end, all else being equal. This article explores the meaning and (...)
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  8. William J. FitzPatrick (2003). Acts, Intentions, and Moral Permissibility: In Defence of the Doctrine of Double Effect. Analysis 63 (280):317–321.
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  9. William J. Fitzpatrick (2006). The Intend/Foresee Distinction and the Problem of “Closeness”. Philosophical Studies 128 (3):585 - 617.
    The distinction between harm that is intended as a means or end, and harm that is merely a foreseen side-effect of one’s action, is widely cited as a significant factor in a variety of ethical contexts. Many use it, for example, to distinguish terrorist acts from certain acts of war that may have similar results as side-effects. Yet Bennett and others have argued that its application is so arbitrary that if it can be used to cast certain harmful actions in (...)
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  10.  41
    William J. FitzPatrick (2014). Skepticism About Naturalizing Normativity: In Defense of Ethical Nonnaturalism. Res Philosophica 91 (4):559-588.
    There is perhaps no more widely shared conviction in contemporary metaethics, even among those who hold otherwise divergent views, than that practical normativity must be capable of being naturalized . My aim is to illuminate the central reasons for skepticism about this. While certain naturalizing projects are plausible for very limited purposes, it is unlikely that any can provide everything we might reasonably want from an account of goodness and badness, rightness and wrongness, and unqualified reasons for acting—at least if (...)
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    William J. FitzPatrick (2007). Climate Change and the Rights of Future Generations. Environmental Ethics 29 (4):369-388.
    Despite widespread agreement that we have moral responsibilities to future generations, many are reluctant to frame the issues in terms of justice and rights. There are indeed philosophical challenges here, particularly concerning nonoverlapping generations. They can, however, be met. For example, talk of justice and rights for future generations in connection with climate change is both appropriate and important, although it requires revising some common theoretical assumptions about the nature of justice and rights. We can, in fact, be bound by (...)
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  12. William J. FitzPatrick (2011). Ethical Non-Naturalism and Normative Properties. In Michael Brady (ed.), New Waves in Metaethics. Palgrave Macmillan
     
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  13.  93
    William J. FitzPatrick (2004). Reasons, Value, and Particular Agents: Normative Relevance Without Motivational Internalism. Mind 113 (450):285-318.
    While differing widely in other respects, both neo-Humean and neo-Kantian approaches to normativity embrace an internalist thesis linking reasons for acting to potential motivation. This thesis pushes in different directions depending on the underlying view of the powers of practical reason, but either way it sets the stage for an attack on realist attempts to ground reasons directly in facts about value. How can reasons that are not somehow grounded in motivational features of the agent nonetheless count as reasons for (...)
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  14.  42
    William Joseph FitzPatrick (2000). Teleology and the Norms of Nature. Garland Pub..
    This work is an examination of teleological attributions (i.e. ascriptions of proper functions and natural ends) to the features and behavior of living things, with a view ultimately to understanding their application to human life and the significance they may or may not have for an understanding of human nature and values. The author argues that such teleological attributions do indeed apply to living things, including human beings, and that this sheds substantial light on what living things are; interestingly, it (...)
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  15.  29
    William J. FitzPatrick (2004). Totipotency and the Moral Status of Embryos: New Problems for an Old Argument. Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (1):108–122.
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  16.  30
    William J. FitzPatrick (2012). Book Reviews Kitcher , Philip . The Ethical Project Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2011. Pp. 422. $49.95 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 123 (1):167-174.
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    William J. Fitzpatrick (2004). Valuing Nature Non-Instrumentally. Journal of Value Inquiry 38 (3):315-332.
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  18. William J. FitzPatrick, Gerhard Øverland, Talbot Brewer, David Enoch & Philip Stratton‐Lake (2005). 2.“Doing and Allowing” and Doing and Allowing “Doing and Allowing” and Doing and Allowing (Pp. 799-808). Ethics 115 (4).
     
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  19.  11
    William J. FitzPatrick (2009). Recent Work : Recent Work on Ethical Realism. Analysis 69 (4):746 - 760.
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  20.  21
    William J. FitzPatrick (2010). Thomson, Judith Jarvis . Normativity . Chicago: Open Court, 2008 . Pp. Ix+271. $27.97 (Paper). Ethics 120 (2):417-422.
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    William J. Fitzpatrick (2007). Satisficing and Maximizing: Moral Theorists on Practical Reason - Edited by Michael Byron. Philosophical Books 48 (3):281-283.
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    William J. FitzPatrick (2007). Review of Giovanni Boniolo, Gabriele de Anna (Eds.), Evolutionary Ethics and Contemporary Biology. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (4).
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  23.  4
    William J. FitzPatrick (2006). Joseph Raz, The Practice of Value:The Practice of Value. Ethics 116 (4):805-809.
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  24. William J. FitzPatrick, Cheryl Misak, Mark Greene, Daniel Statman, Brian Barry & Kimberley Brownlee (2008). 10. Kristin Shrader‐Frechette, Taking Action, Saving Lives: Our Duties to Protect Environmental and Public Health Kristin Shrader‐Frechette, Taking Action, Saving Lives: Our Duties to Protect Environmental and Public Health (Pp. 757-761). [REVIEW] Ethics 118 (4).
     
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  25. William J. FitzPatrick (2011). Teleology and the Norms of Nature. Routledge.
    This work is an examination of teleological attributions i.e. ascriptions of proper functions and natural ends) to the features and behavior of living things with a view to understanding their application to human life.
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  26. William J. FitzPatrick (2000). Teleology and the Norms of Nature. Routledge.
    This work is an examination of teleological attributions i.e. ascriptions of proper functions and natural ends) to the features and behavior of living things with a view to understanding their application to human life.
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  27. William J. Fitzpatrick (2006). The Intend/Foresee Distinction and the Problem of “Closeness”. Philosophical Studies 128 (3):585-617.
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