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  1. William J. Greenberg (1985). Aspects of a Theory of Singular Reference: Prolegomena to a Dialectical Logic of Singular Terms. Garland Pub..
    The difficulties encountered by attempts to treat identity as a relation between an object and itself are well-known: "...the sentence 'The morning star is...the morning star' is analytic and a truism, while...'The morning star is the evening star' is synthetic and represents a 'valuable extension of our knowledge'... But if {the morning star} and {the evening star} are the same object, and identity is taken as a relation holding between this object and itself, then it is impossible to explain how (...)
     
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  2. William J. Greenberg (1996). A Theory of Complexes. Epistemologia 19 (1):85-112.
     
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  3. William J. Greenberg (1998). On Chalmers' "Principle of Organizational Invariance" and His "Dancing Qualia" and "Fading Qualia" Thought Experiments. Journal of Consciousness Studies 5 (1):53-58.
    David Chalmers has proposed several principles in his attack on the ‘hard problem’ of consciousness. One of these is the principle of organizational invariance , which he asserts is significantly supported by two thought experiments involving human brains and their functional silicon-based isomorphs. I claim that while the principle is an intelligible hypothesis and could possibly be true, his thought experiments fail to provide support for it.
     
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  4.  44
    William J. Greenberg (1996). The Paradox of Identity. Epistemologia (2):207-226.
    Call a semantics for singular terms *extensionalist* if it embraces (1) and *classical* if it embraces (2). -/- 1. The meaning of a singular term is exhausted by its reference. 2. The reference of a singular term is an entity that is logically simple. -/- Call a semantics *adequate* if it distinguishes material identity (a = b) from formal identity (a = a). -/- Frege reacts to the inadequacy of classical extensionalist semantics by rejecting (1). This he does (...)
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