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William Keith [7]William M. Keith [3]
  1. Zoltan P. Majdik & William M. Keith (2011). Expertise as Argument: Authority, Democracy, and Problem-Solving. [REVIEW] Argumentation 25 (3):371-384.
    This article addresses the problem of expertise in a democratic political system: the tension between the authority of expertise and the democratic values that guide political life. We argue that for certain problems, expertise needs to be understood as a dialogical process, and we conceptualize an understanding of expertise through and as argument that positions expertise as constituted by and a function of democratic values and practices, rather than in the possession of, acquisition of, or relationship to epistemic materials. Conceptualizing (...)
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  2. Zoltan P. Majdik & William M. Keith (2011). The Problem of Pluralistic Expertise: A Wittgensteinian Approach to the Rhetorical Basis of Expertise. Social Epistemology 25 (3):275 - 290.
    This essay draws on Ludwig Wittgenstein?s work to argue for a practice-oriented concept of expertise. We propose that conceptualizing types of expertise as having a family resemblance, relative to the problems such expertise addresses, escapes certain limitations of defining expertise as primarily epistemic. Recognizing the pragmatic purchase on actual problems a Wittgensteinian approach provides to discussions of expertise, we seek to understand the nature of expertise in situations where the people who need to make a difficult decision do not possess (...)
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  3. William M. Keith & David E. Beard (2008). Toulmin's Rhetorical Logic: What's the Warrant for Warrants? Philosophy and Rhetoric 41 (1):22-50.
  4. William Keith (2003). Leah Ceccarelli (2001) Shaping Science with Rhetoric: The Cases of Dobzhansky, Schrödinger, and Wilson. Argumentation 17 (1):123-126.
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  5. William Keith (1995). Argument Practices. Argumentation 9 (1):163-179.
    The move to Postmodernism in argumentation is often predicated on the rejection of the formal basis of argument in logic. While this rejection may be justified, and is widely discussed in the literature, the loss of logic creates problems that a Postmodern theory of argument must address without recourse to logic and its attendant modernist assumptions. This essay argues that conceiving of argument in terms ofpractices will address the key problematics of Postmodernism without abandoning those features of argumentation that make (...)
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  6. William Keith (1995). De Rhetorica Fullerae. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 25 (4):488-496.
    I should say at the outset that I actually like this book a lot, but I am not sure how comfortable I am with liking it. It is the sort of innovative, exciting, exasperating, infuriating, and provocative book that's good even when it's bad, because it sets everyone to talking and arguing about all kinds of things. Initially, I will give a brief gloss (if such a thing makes sense in reference to a piece of Steve Fuller's writing) of (...)
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  7. William Keith (1994). Artificial Intelligences, Feminist and Otherwise. Social Epistemology 8 (4):333 – 340.
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  8. Kenneth S. Zagacki & William Keith (1992). Rhetoric, Topoi, and Scientific Revolutions. Philosophy and Rhetoric 25 (1):59 - 78.
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  9. William Keith (1990). Cognitive Science on a Wing and a Prayer. Social Epistemology 343 (October-December):343-355.
  10. William Keith (1990). Response to Slezak: Nein, Ich Verstehe Nicht. Social Epistemology 4 (4):361 – 367.
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