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Profile: William H. Krieger (University of Rhode Island)
  1.  13
    William H. Krieger (2013). Medical Apps: Public and Academic Perspectives. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 56 (2):259-273.
    Relatively new and now ubiquitous, smartphones and tablet computers are changing our lives by asking us to rethink the ways that we conduct business, form and maintain relationships, and read books and magazines. In the same capacity, mobile devices are redefining how health care is administered, monitored, and delivered through specialized technologies called medical apps (applications). In general, apps are pieces of software that can be installed and run on a variety of hardware platforms, including smartphones, tablets, laptops, and desktop (...)
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  2.  10
    William Krieger (2006). Can There Be a Philosophy of Archaeology: Processual Archaeology and the Philosophy of Science. Lexington Books.
  3.  6
    William H. Krieger (2014). Marketing Archaeology. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (5):923-939.
    In the 19th century, ‘scientific archaeologists’ split from their antiquarian colleagues over the role that provenience (context) plays in the value of an artifact. These archaeologists focus on documenting an artifact’s context when they remove it from its original location. Archaeologists then use this contextual information to place these artifacts within a particular larger assemblage, in a particular time and space. Once analyzed, the artifacts found in a site or region can be used to document, to understand, and explain the (...)
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  4.  5
    William Krieger (2005). Digging Up Diversity. Metascience 14 (3):441-445.
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  5.  3
    William H. Krieger (2012). Theory, Locality, and Methodology in Archaeology: Just Add Water? Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 2 (2):243-257.
    Continuing the work of the ‘Vienna Circle’, philosopher Carl Hempel created explanatory models to ground scientific inquiry in logic and empirical truth. Beginning with the physical sciences, he explored the application of these models to the social sciences as well. Terrestrial archaeologists incorporated Hempelian concepts by calling for global changes in archaeological methodology. These changes, explicitly designed to maximize data collection, were developed using particular idiosyncratic geographical cues that would undermine archaeology if implemented in other contexts. In this article, I (...)
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  6.  2
    William H. Krieger & B. Buxton, UNESCO, URI, and Archaeology in the Deep Blue Sea: Archaeological Ethics and Archaeological Oceanography.
    Multiple groups have interests that intersect within the new field of deep submergence archaeology. These groups‟ differing priorities present challenges for interdisciplinary collaboration, particularly as there are no established guidelines for best practices in such scenarios. Associating the term 'archaeology' with projects directed at underwater cultural heritage that are are not guided by archaeologists poses a real risk to that heritage. Recognizing that the relevant professional organizations, local laws, and conventions currently have little ability to protect pieces of cultural heritage (...)
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  7.  2
    William H. Krieger (2008). Kosso's Coherence. History and Theory 47 (3):436-442.
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  8. Jeremy Beer, Bryce Christensen, Kirk Fitzpatrick, Pamela Hood, William H. Krieger, Peter McNamara, Emily Sullivan & Lee Trepanier (eds.) (2014). The Free Market and the Human Condition: Essays on Economics and Culture. Lexington Books.
    The Free Market and the Human Condition explores the human condition as situated in the free market from a variety of academic disciplines. By relying upon contributors who approach the topic from their respective disciplines, the book provides an accumulated picture of the free market, the human condition, and the relationship between them.
     
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  9. William H. Krieger, Marketing Archaeology.
    In the 19th century, ‘scientific archaeologists’ split from their antiquarian colleagues over the role that provenience plays in the value of an artifact. These archaeologists focus on documenting an artifact’s context when they remove it from its original location. Archaeologists then use this contextual information to place these artifacts within a particular larger assemblage, in a particular time and space. Once analyzed, the artifacts found in a site or region can be used to document, to understand, and explain the past. (...)
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  10. William H. Krieger, Medical Apps: Public and Academic Perspectives.
    Medical apps have featured in popular websites and mainstream news media in recent months. However, there has been almost no mention of these tools in journals focusing on relevant ethical or social issues, including conflict of interest, the role of politics in science, and technological oversight.This essay examines the role that these philosophical issues might play in answering both public and academic questions about these pieces of emergent technology.
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  11. William Krieger (ed.) (2011). Science at the Frontiers: Perspectives on the History and Philosophy of Science. Lexington Books.
    Science at the Frontiers brings new voices to the study of the history and philosophy of science. it supplements current literature on these fields, highlighting sciences that are overlooked by the current literature and viewing classic problems in the field from new perspectives.
     
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  12. William H. Krieger (ed.) (2011). Science at the Frontiers: Perspectives on the History and Philosophy of Science. Lexington Books.
    Compiled by an archaeologist and philosopher of science, Science at the Frontiers: Perspectives on the History and Philosophy of Science supplements current literature in the history and philosophy of science with essays approaching the traditional problems of the field from new perspectives and highlighting disciplines usually overlooked by the canon. William H. Krieger brings together scientists from a number of disciplines to answer these questions and more in a volume appropriate for both students and academics in the field.
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  13. William Harvey Krieger (2003). The Philosophy of Archaeology: Processual Archaeology and the Philosophy of Science. Dissertation, The Claremont Graduate University
    In the 1960s, archaeologists en masse were voicing dissatisfaction with the archaeological status quo. Rather than record static facts as historians, archaeologists wanted to study fluid processes as scientists. As Hempelian explanation, where an event is explained when it is subsumed under a law or law-like statement, showed promise as a way to recast archaeology in this manner, it was chosen as the theoretical base for what became known as processual, or 'new archaeology.' ;Unfortunately, Hempelian archaeology ran into a number (...)
     
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  14. William H. Krieger & Brian L. Keeley (2006). The Unexpected Realist. In Brian L. Keeley (ed.), Paul Churchland. Cambridge University Press
    There are two ways to do the unexpected. The banal way—let's call it the expectedly unexpected—is simply to chart the waters of what is and is not done, and then set out to do something different. For a philosopher, this can be done by embracing a method of non sequitor or by perhaps inverting some strongly held assumption of the field. The more interesting way— the unexpectedly unexpected—is to transform the expectations themselves; to do something new and contextualize it in (...)
     
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  15. James R. Misanin, Donna M. Zawacki & William G. Krieger (1977). Differential Maternal Behavior of the Rat Dam Toward Natural and Foster Pups: Implication for Nutrition Research. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 10 (4):313-316.