Search results for 'William S. Corlett Jr' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  1
    R. H. Helmholz (2002). Mary Elizabeth Basile, Jane Fair Bestor, Daniel R. Coquillette, and Charles Donahue Jr., Eds. And Transs.,“Lex Mercatoria” and Legal Pluralism: A Late Thirteenth-Century Treatise and Its Afterlife. Cambridge, Mass.: Ames Foundation, 1998. Pp. 213 and 118 (Nos. 1–42 Repeated) Plus 4 Black-and-White Plates; Tables and Diagrams. Distributed by William S. Hein & Co., Inc., 1285 Main St., Buffalo, NY 14209-1987. [REVIEW] Speculum 77 (1):137-138.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Edward Lipuma (2006). “The Relation of Culture to History: A Review of Marshall Sahlins’s Apologies to Thucydides and William Sewell’s Logics of History” Review of Apologies to Thucydides: Understanding History as Culture and Vice Versa by Marshall Sahlins and Logics of History: Social Theory and Social Transformation by William H. Sewell, Jr. [REVIEW] Clio 36:59-68.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Ronald E. Roblin (1977). William G. Bywater, Jr.'S "Clive Bell's Eye". [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 37 (3):425.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Edward F. Mooney (2002). The Nature of True Virtue: Theology, Psychology, and Politics in the Writings of Henry James, Sr., Henry James, Jr., and William James. James Duban. Madison: Farleigh Dickinson University Press, 2001. 237 Pp. $43.50 Hard Copy, 0-8386-3888-0. Though Cumbersomely Titled, James Duban's The Nature of True Virtue is a Pithy. [REVIEW] Journal of Speculative Philosophy 16 (4):294.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Donald Phillip Verene (1994). Mary Anne O'Neil, William E. Cain, Christopher Wise, C. S. Schreiner, Willis Salomon, James A. Grimshaw, Jr., Donald K. Hedrick, Wendell V. Harris, Paul Duro, Julia Epstein, Gerald Prince, Douglas Robinson, Lynne S. Vieth, Richard Eldridge, Robert Stoothoff, John Anzalone, Kevin Walzer, Eric J. Ziolkowski, Jacqueline LeBlanc, Anna Carew-Miller, Alfred R. Mele, David Herman, James M. Lang, Andrew J. McKenna, Michael Calabrese, Robert Tobin, Sandor Goodhart, Moira Gatens, Paul Douglass, John F. Desmond, James L. Battersby, Marie J. Aquilino, Celia E. Weller, Joel Black, Sandra Sherman, Herman Rapaport, Jonathan Levin, Ali Abdullatif Ahmida, David Lewis Schaefer. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 18 (1):131.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  13
    William S. Corlett Jr (1982). The Availability of Lincoln's Political Religion. Political Theory 10 (4):520-540.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  43
    Edgar C. Boedeker Jr (2002). Phenomenological Ontology or the Explanation of Social Norms?: A Confrontation with William Blattner's Heidegger's Temporal Idealism. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 84 (3):334-344.
    Some of the most important contributions over the past two decades to understanding Heidegger's thought have been made by philosophers writing in English and sharing the broad perspective of analytic – or, perhaps better, “post-analytic” – philosophy. With Heidegger's Temporal Idealism, William Blattner has moved this approach several important steps forward. Like others in this recent movement, he interprets Heidegger not so much in the terms of existentialism or post-structuralism, as in those of the later Wittgenstein, classical American pragmatism, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  20
    Dwayne A. Tunstall (2011). Prophetic Ethics: Rufus Burrow, Jr.'S, Personalist Contribution to Religious Ethics. The Pluralist 6 (1):14-29.
    Religious ethicists use a variety of conceptual tools from many disciplines—for example, psychology, sociology, anthropology, theology, philosophy, political science, cognitive science, and neuroscience—to study various religious traditions. They use these interdisciplinary tools to study how these traditions influence and are influenced by the cultural mores and societal norms of the societies in which these traditions are practiced. If William Schweiker's depiction of religious ethics in The Blackwell Companion to Religious Ethics is representative of the field's emerging self-conception, then religious (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Paul Harvey Jr (1996). Plautus: Menaechmi by A. S. Gratwick; Barbarian Play: Plautus' Roman Comedy by William S. Anderson. [REVIEW] Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 89:495-496.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. William S. Corlett Jr (1989). Pocock, Foucault, Forces of Reassurance. Political Theory 17 (1):77-100.
    One cannot step twice into the same river, nor can one grasp any mortal substance in a stable condition, but it scatters and again gathers; it forms and dissolves, and approaches and departs—Heraclitus. Play is always play of absence and presence, but if one wishes to think it radically, one must think it before the alternative of presence and absence; it is necessary to think of Being as presence or absence from the possibility of play on, and not the other (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  12
    Paul Nagy (2006). The Nature of True Virtue: Theology, Psychology, and Politics in the Writings of Henry James, Sr., Henry James, Jr., and William James. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (1):159-164.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  13
    Paul Nagy (2006). Review: James Duban. The Nature of True Virtue: Theology, Psychology, and Politics in the Writings of Henry James, Sr., Henry James, Jr., and William James. Madison: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2001. London: Associated University Presses, 2001. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (1):159-164.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Christopher Perricone (1991). George Santayana, "Interpretations of Poetry and Religion", Critical Edition, William G. Holzberger and Herman J. Saatkamp, Jr. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 27 (1):129.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Nathan A. Scott Jr (1997). 4. Theology, Poetics, Psychotherapy- The Field of the Imagination: Some Reflections on the Legacy of William F. Lynch, S.J. [REVIEW] Logos 1 (1).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Ignas K. Skrupskelis (1988). William G. Holzberger and Herman J. Saatkamp, Jr. "Persons and Places: Critical Edition", The Works of George Santayana, Vol. I. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 24 (1):155.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Chamsy el-Ojeili (2007). Reviews: William S. Lewis, Louis Althusser and the Traditions of French Marxism (Lexington Books, 2005); Louis Althusser, Philosophy of the Encounter: Later Writings, 1978—1987 (Verso, 2006); Alain Badiou, Infinite Thought: Truth and the Return to Philosophy (Continuum, 2003); Alain Badiou, Metapolitics (Verso, 2005); Slavoj Žižek (Ed.), Lacan: The Silent Partners (Verso, 2006). [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 89 (1):139-143.
    Reviews: William S. Lewis, Louis Althusser and the Traditions of French Marxism ; Louis Althusser, Philosophy of the Encounter: Later Writings, 1978—1987 ; Alain Badiou, Infinite Thought: Truth and the Return to Philosophy ; Alain Badiou, Metapolitics ; Slavoj Žižek , Lacan: The Silent Partners.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  9
    Steven Fesmire (1998). Remaking the Modern Mind: William James's Reconstruction of Rationality. Southwest Philosophy Review 14 (2):65-81.
    The past few decades have witnessed a growing concern to reveal the futility of the quest for absolute, ahistorical rational standards. Instead, philosophers have sought theories that will prove responsive to the humanness of rationality. The classical pragmatist tradition in American philosophy provides a tremendously fruitful yet still too often overlooked framework for accommodating, clarifying, and extending current explorations of human reason.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  29
    Paul Jerome Croce (2007). Mankind's Own Providence: From Swedenborgian Philosophy of Use to William James's Pragmatism. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 43 (3):490 - 508.
    : It is part of the conventional wisdom about the James family that the elder Henry James (1811–82) had a large influence on his son, William James (1842–1910), in the direction of religious interests. But William neither adopted his father's spirituality nor did he regard it as a foil to his own secularity. Instead, after first rejecting the elder James's idiosyncratic faith, he became increasingly intrigued with his insights into the natural world, which were in turn shaped by (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  12
    Mathias Girel (2007). A Chronicle of Pragmatism in France Before 1907: William James in Renouvier’s Critique Philosophique. In Sergio Franzese (ed.), Fringes of Religious Experience, Cross-Perspectives on James’s The Varieties of Religious Experience. Ontos Verlag 169-200.
    In this paper, I'm giving an account of William James's reception in the columns of Charles Renouvier's journal, La Critique philosophique. The papers explores the discussions between James and Renouvier on Free Will, Philosophical systems, Consciousness and Pluralism.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  73
    Jennifer Welchman (2006). William James's "the Will to Believe" and the Ethics of Self-Experimentation. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (2):229-241.
    : William James's "The Will to Believe" has been criticized for offering untenable arguments in support of belief in unvalidated hypotheses. Although James is no longer accused of suggesting we can create belief ex nihilo, critics continue to charge that James's defense of belief in what he called the "religious hypothesis" confuses belief with hypothesis adoption and endorses willful persistence in unvalidated beliefs—not, as he claimed, in pursuit of truth, but merely to avoid the emotional stress of abandoning (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Wesley Cooper (2002). The Unity of William James's Thought. Vanderbilt University Press.
    Wesley Cooper opposes the traditional view of William Jamesís philosophy which dismissed it as fragmented or merely popular, arguing instead that there is a systematic philosophy to be found in James's writings. His doctrine of pure experience is the binding thread that links his earlier psychological theorizing to his later epistemological, religious, and pragmatic concerns.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  22. Alexander Klein (2008). Divide Et Impera! William James's Pragmatist Tradition in the Philosophy of Science. Philosophical Topics 36 (1):129-166.
    ABSTRACT. May scientists rely on substantive, a priori presuppositions? Quinean naturalists say "no," but Michael Friedman and others claim that such a view cannot be squared with the actual history of science. To make his case, Friedman offers Newton's universal law of gravitation and Einstein's theory of relativity as examples of admired theories that both employ presuppositions (usually of a mathematical nature), presuppositions that do not face empirical evidence directly. In fact, Friedman claims that the use of such presuppositions is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  23. Horace Meyer Kallen (1937). Remarks on R. B. Perry's Portrait of William James. Philosophical Review 46 (1):68-78.
    Kallen's review of Ralph Barton Perry (1935) The Thought and Character of William James--in which he offers a pointed criticism.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. James O. Pawelski (2001). Heaven's Champion: William James's Philosophy of Religion (Review). [REVIEW] Journal of Speculative Philosophy 15 (1):56-61.
    William James is notorious for the large number of inconsistencies and at least apparent contradictions in his writings. Many readers conclude that he should be appreciated more for his profound but erratic insights than for any coherent philosophical perspective. Ellen Kappy Suckiel disagrees. She argues that James is far more careful and systematic than many readers realize. Her work on James is guided by the attempt to lay bare his coherent philosophical vision and the consistent philosophical methodology underlying (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  16
    Steven P. Hopkins (2009). "I Walk Weeping in Pangs of a Mothers Torment for Her Children": Women's Laments in the Poetry and Prophecies of William Blake. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (1):39-81.
    Cross-cultural scholarship in ritual studies on women's laments provides us with a fresh vantage point from which to consider the function of women and women's complaining voices in the epic poems of William Blake. In this essay, I interpret Thel, Oothoon, and Enitharmon as strong voices of experience that unleash some of Blake's most profound meditations on social, sexual, individual, and institutional forms of violence and injustice, offering what might aptly be called an ethics of witness. Tracing the (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  26.  8
    James Calvin Davis (2005). William Ames's Calvinist Ambiguity Over Freedom of Conscience. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (2):333 - 355.
    Reformed Christianity's qualified embrace of freedom of conscience is per- haps best represented by William Ames (1576-1633). This essay explores Ames's interpretation of conscience, his understanding of its relationship to natural law, Scripture, and civil authority, and his vacillation on the sub- ject of conscientious freedom. By rooting his interpretation of conscience in natural law, Ames provided a foundation for conscience as an authority whose convictions are binding and worthy of some civil respect and free- dom. At the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  27.  6
    Klaus Hentschel (2002). Why Not One More Imponderable? John William Draper's Tithonic Rays. Foundations of Chemistry 4 (1):5-59.
    This paper reconstructs what may have led the American professorof chemistry andnatural philosophy John William Draper to introduce a new kind ofradiation, whichhe dubbed `Tithonic rays''. After presenting his and earlierempirical findings onthe chemical action of light in Section 3, I analyze his pertinentpapers in Section 4with the aim of identifying the various types of argumentshe raised infavor of this new actinic entity (or more precisely, this newnatural kind of raybesides optical, thermal and perhaps also phosphorogenic rays).From a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28.  20
    Bruce Wilshire (2009). William James's Pragmatism : A Distinctly Mixed Bag. In John J. Stuhr (ed.), 100 Years of Pragmatism: William James's Revolutionary Philosophy. Indiana University Press
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  11
    Kenneth W. Stikkers (2009). Review of Sergio Franzese, The Ethics of Energy: William James's Moral Philosophy in Focus. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (5).
    Every scholar and reader of William James is aware of his frequent uses of "energy," especially in his discussions of ethics and most notably in his 1906 Presidential Address to the American Philosophical Association, "The Energies of Men".[1] But while other interpretations treat James's use of "energy" as merely one of his several folksy metaphors, The Ethics of Energy: William James's Moral Philosophy in Focus is the first monograph, as its author, Sergio Franzese, rightly claims, to focus (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  10
    Ruth Weintraub (2003). A Non-Fideistic Reading of William James's "The Will to Believe". History of Philosophy Quarterly 20 (1):103 - 121.
    William James’ declared intention is to oppose Clifford’s claim that it “is wrong always, everywhere, and for every one, to believe anything upon insufficient evidence”. But I argue that he is confused about his doxastic prescriptions. He isn’t primarily concerned, as he thinks he is, with the legitimacy of belief in the absence of sufficient evidence. The most important contribution of his essay is a suggestion - a highly insightful and contentious one - as to what it is to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  20
    Thomas M. Osborne Jr (2014). Human Action in Thomas Aquinas, John Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham. The Catholic University of America Press.
    Thomas M. Osborne Jr. ... Vivarium 32 (1994): 62–71. te Velde, Rude A. “Natura in se ipsa recurva est: Duns Scotus and Aquinas on the Relationship between Nature and Will.” In John Duns Scotus: ... “William of Ockham's Theological Ethics .
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  8
    E. Paul Colella (2014). Seeking the Center of Truth's Forest: William James in California, 1898. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 49 (3):348-370.
    “Philosophical Conceptions and Practical Results” has long been recognized for the special place that it occupies in the history of American philosophy. In it, American pragmatism enters into a wider, popular consciousness for the first time, acquiring both its name and its lineage. In the course of a brief hour with George Holmes Howison’s Philosophical Union at Berkeley in August of 1898, in a gymnasium before an audience of eight hundred people, pragmatism also acquires its living voice as William (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  21
    Sami Pihlström (2011). Eino Kaila on Pragmatism and Religion: An Introduction to Kaila's 1912 Essay on William James. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 47 (2):146-157.
    American pragmatism was, in the beginning of the twentieth century, a major movement not only in its home country but also in other parts of the globe as well, largely (but not exclusively) thanks to William James’s (1842–1910) international activity. In Europe, Italian and French philosophers, in particular, established their own pragmatist “schools,” and pragmatism also spread to the northern parts of the continent, including Germany and the Scandinavian countries. Even in the relatively remote Finland, Jamesian pragmatism rapidly became (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  7
    E. Paul Colella (2013). Seeking the Center of Truth's Forest: William James in California, 1898. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 49 (3):348-370.
    “Philosophical Conceptions and Practical Results” has long been recognized for the special place that it occupies in the history of American philosophy. In it, American pragmatism enters into a wider, popular consciousness for the first time, acquiring both its name and its lineage. In the course of a brief hour with George Holmes Howison’s Philosophical Union at Berkeley in August of 1898, in a gymnasium before an audience of eight hundred people, pragmatism also acquires its living voice as William (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. William Mckenith (2004). William P. Alston's Epistemology of Religious Experience: The Problem of Subjectivism. Dissertation, Drew University
    William P. Alston's book, Perceiving God: The Epistemology of Religious Experience , challenges the contemporary view that religious experience is purely subjective. He theorizes that a direct experiential awareness of God can produce immediately justified beliefs about God. Accordingly, this dissertation critically assesses the problem of subjectivism thought to taint Alston's epistemology of religious experience. ;Upon disclosing the prevalence of subjectivity, and identifying the potential for objectivity in religious experience, this treatise produces a viable resolve for objectivity in mystical (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  5
    William Shirwood (1968). William of Sherwood's Treatise on Syncategorematic Words. Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press.
    Translator's Introduction This book may be studied independently, but in several respects it is a companion volume to my William of Sherwood's Introduction ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  4
    Gregory Radick (2013). The Professor and the Pea: Lives and Afterlives of William Bateson’s Campaign for the Utility of Mendelism. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (2):280-291.
    As a defender of the fundamental importance of Mendel’s experiments for understanding heredity, the English biologist William Bateson did much to publicize the usefulness of Mendelian science for practical breeders. In the course of his campaigning, he not only secured a reputation among breeders as a scientific expert worth listening to but articulated a vision of the ideal relations between pure and applied science in the modern state. Yet historical writing about Bateson has tended to underplay these utilitarian elements (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  38. P. J. Croce (1995). William James's Scientific Education. History of the Human Sciences 8 (1):9-27.
    William James's disgust for scientific arrogance was not in defiance of his early education in science, but because of it. In particular, James was influenced by the probabilistic method of Charles Darwin's theory of natural selection, especially as interpreted by Charles Sanders Peirce. Peirce, who was James's most immediate scientific influence, maintained an unresolved ambiguity between a probabilistic scientific fallibilism and a confidence in science's quest for certainty, while James emphasized the fallibilism of science as the crowning evidence for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  2
    Francisco Javier López Frías (2014). William J. Morgan’s ‘Conventionalist Internalism’ Approach. Furthering Internalism? A Critical Hermeneutical Response. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 8 (2):157-171.
    Several authors, such as William J. Morgan, John S. Russell and R. Scott Kretchmar, have claimed that the limits between the diverse normative theories of sport need to be revisited. Most of these works are philosophically grounded in Anglo-American philosophical approaches. For instance, William J. Morgan’s proposal is mainly based on Richard Rorty’s philosophy. But he also discusses with some European philosophers like Jürgen Habermas. However, Habermas’ central ideas are rejected by Morgan. The purpose of this (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  40.  18
    Niall O'Flaherty (2010). The Rhetorical Strategy of William Paley's Natural Theology (1802): Part 1, William Paley's Natural Theology in Context. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (1):19-25.
    This article reconstructs the historical and philosophical contexts of William Paley’s Natural theology . In the wake of the French Revolution, widely believed to be the embodiment of an atheistic political credo, the refutation of the transmutational biological theories of Buffon and Erasmus Darwin was naturally high on Paley’s agenda. But he was also responding to challenges arising from his own moral philosophy, principally the psychological quandary of how men were to be kept in mind of the Creator. It (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  41. Stephen T. Casper (2014). Chickens and Eggs A Commentary on Chris Renwick's “Completing the Circle of the Social Sciences? William Beveridge and Social Biology at London School of Economics During the 1930s”. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (4):506-514.
    Why would anyone want there to be natural foundations for the social sciences? In a provocative essay exploring precisely that question, historian Chris Renwick uses an interwar debate featuring William Beveridge, Lancelot Hogben, and Friedrich Hayek to begin to imagine what might have been had such a program calling for biological knowledge to form the natural bases of the social sciences been realized at the London School of Economics. Yet perhaps Renwick grants too much attention to differences and “what-ifs” (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  59
    Walter B. Mead (1994). William Poteat's Anthropology. Tradition and Discovery 21 (1):33-44.
    Using the metaphor of a circle with its center, periphery, and radius, this essay explores William Poteat's understanding of the self, or "mindbody," in its dynamic and creative relation to the larger world, or cosmos, identifying the mindbody's prereflective radix with the "center," its boundary or point of interface with the larger world with the "periphery," and its dialectical evolution and articulation of a sense of coherence and meaning in terms of a pretensive and retrotensive "radius.".
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  46
    Margaret Cameron (2005). What’s in a Name? Students of William of Champeaux on Thevox Significativa. [REVIEW] Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 9 (1):93-114.
    William of Champeaux is best known as Peter Abelard's teacher and the proponent of realism of universals. In recent years, many works on the linguistic liberal arts - grammar, dialectic and rhetoric - have been attributed to him. However, at least in the case of the dialectical commentaries, these attributions have been hastily made and are probably incorrect. The commentaries themselves, correctly situated in the time and place when Abelard and William worked at Notre Dame, nonetheless deserve close (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  64
    Klaas J. Kraay (2005). William L. Rowe's A Priori Argument for Atheism. Faith and Philosophy 22 (2):211-234.
    William Rowe’s a posteriori arguments for the non-existence of God are well-known. Rather less attention has been given, however, to Rowe’s intriguing a priori argument for atheism. In this paper, I examine the three published responses to Rowe’s a priori argument (due to Bruce Langtry, William Morris, and Daniel and Frances Howard-Snyder, respectively). I conclude that none is decisive, but I show that Rowe’s argument nevertheless requires more defence than he provides.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  45.  56
    D. Z. Phillips (2007). William Hasker's Avoidance of the Problems of Evil and God (Or: On Looking Outside the Igloo). [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 62 (1):33 - 42.
    Our Book Review Editor, James Keller, invited William Hasker to write a review of the Book by D.Z. Phillips, The Problem of Evil and the Problem of God and then in consultation with the Editor-in-Chief invited Phillips to respond. Aware of both their respect for each other and their philosophical differences we planned that Hasker’s review and Phillips’ response would appear in the same issue of the International Journal for Philosophy of Religion. Unfortunately that was not to be. Dewi, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  46.  72
    Anthony Landreth & Robert C. Richardson (2004). Localization and the New Phrenology: A Review Essay on William Uttal's the New Phrenology. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 17 (1):107-123.
    William Uttal's The new phrenology is a broad attack on localization in cognitive neuroscience. He argues that even though the brain is a highly differentiated organ, "high level cognitive functions" should not be localized in specific brain regions. First, he argues that psychological processes are not well-defined. Second, he criticizes the methods used to localize psychological processes, including imaging technology: he argues that variation among individuals compromises localization, and that the statistical methods used to construct activation maps are flawed. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  47.  16
    Raphael Lataster (2015). A Philosophical and Historical Analysis of William Lane Craig's Resurrection of Jesus Argument. Think 14 (39):59-71.
    William Lane Craig is a prolific Christian apologist who has written many articles and popular books on the mainly philosophical arguments for God's existence, and is famed for his debating, and his engaging with the public. His work with philosophical arguments is significant, as there is no confirmed empirical evidence for the existence of God, nor can there be any good historical evidence; sound historical methodology necessarily being dismissive of supernatural claims. Craig has formulated a number of arguments that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  2
    Steven P. Marrone (2016). Augustine’s Confessions: Philosophy in Autobiography Ed. By William E. Mann. Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (1):159-160.
    This collection of eight essays on Augustine’s most widely read work focuses, as William Mann says in his introduction, on Augustine as a philosopher. Not every reader will agree that Augustine did indeed philosophize. Many would insist that whatever speculation Augustine engaged in, it was solely as a theologian. Yet each of the authors in this superb volume approaches Augustine in the context of the philosophy of the late Roman world, especially Neoplatonic philosophy. Their success in showing how the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  4
    Marianne Sommer (2005). Ancient Hunters and Their Modern Representatives: William Sollas's Anthropology From Disappointed Bridge to Trunkless Tree and the Instrumentalisation of Racial Conflict. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 38 (2):327-365.
    During the first decades of the 20th century, many anthropologists who had previously adhered to a linear view of human evolution, from an ape via Pithecanthropus erectus and Neanderthal to modern humans, began to change their outlook. A shift towards a branching model of human evolution began to take hold. Among the scientific factors motivating this trend was the insight that mammalian evolution in general was best represented by a branching tree, rather than by a straight line, and that several (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  50. Robert Olby (1987). William Bateson's Introduction of Mendelism to England: A Reassessment. British Journal for the History of Science 20 (4):399-420.
    The recognition of Gregor Mendel's achievement in his study of hybridization was signalled by the ‘rediscovery’ papers of Hugo de Vries, Carl Correns and Erich Tschermak. The dates on which these papers were published are given in Table 1. The first of these—De Vries ‘Comptes rendus paper—was in French and made no mention of Mendel or his paper. The rest, led by De Vries’ Berichte paper, were in German and mentioned Mendel, giving the location of his paper. It has long (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000