Search results for 'William S. Waldron' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. William S. Waldron (1994). How Innovative is the Ālayavijñāna? Journal of Indian Philosophy 22 (3):199-258.score: 870.0
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  2. William S. Waldron (1995). How Innovative is the ?Layavij�?Na? Journal of Indian Philosophy 23 (1):9-51.score: 870.0
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  3. Melissa Williams & Jeremy Waldron (eds.) (2008). Nomos XLVIII: Toleration and Its Limits. NYU Press.score: 610.0
    Toleration has a rich tradition in Western political philosophy. It is, after all, one of the defining topics of political philosophy—historically pivotal in the development of modern liberalism, prominent in the writings of such canonical figures as John Locke and John Stuart Mill, and central to our understanding of the idea of a society in which individuals have the right to live their own lives by their own values, left alone by the state so long as they respect the similar (...)
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  4. Jeremy Waldron (2002). God, Locke, and Equality: Christian Foundations of John Locke's Political Thought. Cambridge University Press.score: 600.0
    This is a concise and profound book from one of the world's leading political and legal philosophers about a major theme, equality, and the proposition that humans are all one another's equals. Jeremy Waldron explores the implications of this fundamental tenet for law, politics, society and economy in the company of John Locke, whose work Waldron regards 'as well-worked-out a theory of basic equality as we have in the canon of political philosophy'. Throughout the text, which is based (...)
     
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  5. Jeremy Waldron (1995). The Wisdom of the Multitude: Some Reflections on Book 3, Chapter 11 of Aristotle's Politics. Political Theory 23 (4):563-584.score: 360.0
  6. Jeremy Waldron (1983). Two Worries About Mixing One's Labour. Philosophical Quarterly 33 (130):37-44.score: 360.0
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  7. Jeremy Waldron (1994). Freeman's Defense of Judicial Review. Law and Philosophy 13 (1):27 - 41.score: 360.0
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  8. Jeremy Waldron (1981). Locke's Account of Inheritance and Bequest. Journal of the History of Philosophy 19 (1):39-51.score: 360.0
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  9. Jeremy Waldron (1983). Steiner's Vanishing Powers. Analysis 43 (2):105 - 106.score: 360.0
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  10. Jeremy Waldron (2007). Pettit's Molecule. In Michael Smith, Robert Goodin & Geoffrey Geoffrey (eds.), Common Minds. Oxford. 143.score: 360.0
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  11. Jonathan Barnes, John M. Cooper, Dorothea Frede, Stephen Taylor Holmes, David Keyt, Fred D. Miller, Josiah Ober, Stephen G. Salkever, Malcolm Schofield & Jeremy Waldron (2005). Aristotle's Politics: Critical Essays. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 360.0
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  12. Janice Waldron (2008). A Discussion of Gunther Schuller's Approach to Conducting: Implications for the Instrumental Music Classroom. Philosophy of Music Education Review 16 (1):97-108.score: 360.0
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  13. J. Waldron (2003). Jeremy Bentham's' Nonsense Upon Stilts'. Utilitas 15 (1).score: 360.0
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  14. Jeremy Waldron (2006). Mr. Morgan's Yacht. In Christine Sypnowich (ed.), The Egalitarian Conscience: Essays in Honour of G. A. Cohen. Oup Oxford.score: 360.0
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  15. Ronald Waldron (1998). William Vantuono, Ed. And Trans., Pearl: An Edition with Verse Translation. Notre Dame, Ind., and London: University of Notre Dame Press, 1995. Pp. Xxxiii, 255; Black-and-White Figures. $29.95 (Cloth); $15.95 (Paper). [REVIEW] Speculum 73 (1):275-277.score: 360.0
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  16. Jeremy Waldron (1990). The Right to Private Property. Clarendon Press.score: 300.0
    Can the right to private property be claimed as one of the `rights of mankind'? This is the central question of this comprehensive and critical examination of the subject of private property. Jeremy Waldron contrasts two types of arguments about rights: those based on historical entitlement, and those based on the importance of property to freedom. He provides a detailed discussion of the theories of property found in Locke's Second Treatise and Hegel's Philosophy of Right to illustrate this contrast. (...)
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  17. Jeremy Waldron (1999). The Dignity of Legislation. Cambridge University Press.score: 300.0
    0n a lucid, concise volume, Jeremy Waldron defends the role of legislation, presenting it as an important mode of governance. Aristotle, Locke and Kant emerge as proponents of the dignity of legislation. Waldron's arguments are of obvious importance and topicality, especially in countries that are considering the introduction of a Bill of Rights. The Dignity of Legislation is original in conception, trenchantly argued and very clearly presented, and will be of interest to a wide range of scholars and (...)
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  18. Jeremy Waldron (2010). Torture, Terror, and Trade-Offs: Philosophy for the White House. OUP Oxford.score: 300.0
    Jeremy Waldron has been a challenging and influential voice in the moral, political and legal debates surrounding the response to terrorism since 9/11. His contributions have spanned the major controversies of the War on Terror - including the morality and legality of torture, whether security can be 'balanced' with liberty, and the relationship between public safety and individual rights. He has also tackled underlying questions essential to understanding the practical debates - including what terrorism is, and what a right (...)
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  19. W. S. Waldron (2000). Beyond Nature/Nurture: Buddhism and Biology on Interdependence. Contemporary Buddhism 1 (2):199-226.score: 240.0
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  20. W. S. Waldron (2002). The Dependent Arising of a Cognitive Unconscious in Buddhism and Science. Contemporary Buddhism 3 (2):141-160.score: 240.0
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  21. F. Gregory Ashby, Elliott M. Waldron, W. William Lee & Amelia Berkman (2001). Suboptimality in Human Categorization and Identification. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 130 (1):77.score: 240.0
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  22. Review author[S.]: Jeremy Waldron (1985). Critical Notice. Mind 94 (374):281-296.score: 240.0
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  23. David Enoch, Taking Disagreement Seriously: On Jeremy Waldron's Law and Disagreement.score: 156.0
    Jeremy Waldron’s Law and Disagreement1 is an extremely important and influential book. Not only is it probably the best known recent text presenting the case against judicial review, but it is also rich in details and arguments regarding related but distinct issues such as the history of political philosophy, the relevance of metaethics to political philosophy, the desirable structure of legislative bodies, the justification of democracy and majoritarianism, Rawls’ political philosophy, and much more. In commenting on such rich work, (...)
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  24. Michael Plaxton (2011). Reflections on Waldron's Archetypes. Law and Philosophy 30 (1):77-103.score: 144.0
    Jeremy Waldron argued that the government lawyers responsible for the ‘torture memos’ acted unprofessionally by undermining the prohibition on torture. He did so partly on the basis that that the torture prohibition represents a ‘legal archetype’ which cannot be undermined without doing considerable harm to large bodies of law. This paper argues that, however much intuitive appeal Waldron’s archetype-based analysis may have, its force is inherently limited. This is so for two reasons. First, the claim that the torture (...)
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  25. Richard Stacey (2010). Democratic Jurisprudence and Judicial Review: Waldron's Contribution to Political Positivism. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 30 (4):749-773.score: 144.0
    This article engages legal positivism conceived of as a political project rather than as a descriptive account of law. Jeremy Waldron’s ‘democratic jurisprudence’ represents such a politicized legal positivism—a normative argument for legal positivism rather than a non-normative claim that legal positivism is true. Unsurprisingly, the essential institutional elements of this democratic jurisprudence turn out to be the familiar features of classical legal positivism, and the case Waldron makes against judicial review grows out of his overarching political position. (...)
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  26. Mark Tushnet (2010). How Different Are Waldron's and Fallon's Core Cases For and Against Judicial Review? Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 30 (1):49-70.score: 144.0
    Recently Jeremy Waldron offered the ‘core of the case against judicial review’. Richard Fallon responded with the ‘core of an uneasy case for judicial review.’ The core case for judicial review rested on a number of important conditions, and the core case against it incorporated a number of important qualifications. The two cases are quite similar once we take the conditions and qualifications into account. At its heart Professor Fallon's case rests on the proposition that ‘[l]egislative action is more (...)
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  27. Nomi M. Stolzenberg & Gideon Yaffe (2006). Waldron's Locke and Locke's Waldron: A Review of Jeremy Waldron's God, Locke, and Equality. [REVIEW] Inquiry 49 (2):186 – 216.score: 140.0
  28. Dimitrios Kyritsis (2006). Representation and Waldron's Objection to Judicial Review. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 26 (4):733-751.score: 126.0
    Jeremy Waldron objects to judicial review of legislation on the ground that it effectively accords the views of a few judges ‘superior voting weight’ to those of ordinary citizens. This objection overlooks that representative government does the same. This article explores the concept of political representation and argues that delegates may be institutionally bound to heed the convictions of their constituents, but they are not their proxies. Rather, they are best viewed as their trustees. They ought to decide according (...)
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  29. Jeremy Waldron (2005). Nozick and Locke: Filling the Space of Rights. Social Philosophy and Policy 22 (1):81-110.score: 120.0
    Do property entitlements define the moral environment in which rights to well-being are defined, or do rights to well-being define the moral environment in which property entitlements are defined? Robert Nozick argued for the former alternative and he denied that any serious attempt had been made to state the latter alternative (what he called “the ‘reverse’ theory”). I actually think John Locke's approach to property can be seen as an instance of the “reverse” theory. And Nozick's can too, inasmuch as (...)
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  30. Jeremy Waldron, Basic Equality.score: 120.0
    This is a three-part study and defense of the idea of basic human equality. (This is the idea that humans are basically one another's equals, as opposed to more derivative theories of the dimensions in which we ought to be equal or the particular implications that equality might have for public policy.) Part (1) of the paper examines the very idea of basic equality and it tries to elucidate it by considering what an opponent of basic human equality (e.g. a (...)
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  31. Jeremy Waldron, Who Needs Rules of Recognition?score: 120.0
    I argue against the idea (made popular by H.L.A. Hart) that the key to a legal system is its "rule of recognition." I argue that much of the work allegedly done by a rule of recognition is either done by a different kind of secondary rule (what Hart called "a rule of change") or it is not done at all (and doesn't have to be done). A rule of change tells us the procedures that must be followed and the substantive (...)
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  32. Jeremy Waldron (1998). Participation: The Right of Rights. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 98 (3):307–337.score: 120.0
    This paper examines the role of political participation in a theory of rights. If political participation is a right, how does it stand in relation to other rights about which the participants may be making political decisions? Suppose a majority of citizens vote in favour of some limit on (say) the free exercise of religion. If their decision is allowed to stand, does that mean that we are giving more weight to the right to participate than to the right to (...)
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  33. Jeremy Waldron, Civilians, Terrorism, and Deadly Serious Conventions.score: 120.0
    This paper asks how we should regard the laws and customs of armed conflict, and specifically the rule prohibiting the targeting of civilians. What view should we take of the moral character and significance of such rules? Some philosophers have suggested that they are best regarded as useful conventions. This view is sometimes motivated by a "deep moral critique" of the rule protecting civilians: Jeff McMahan believes for example that the existing rules protect some who ought to be liable to (...)
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  34. Victor Nuovo (2003). Review of Jeremy Waldron, God, Locke and Equality: Christian Foundations of Locke's Political Thought. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (5).score: 120.0
  35. Ruth Sample (2005). Jeremy Waldron, God, Locke, and Equality: Christian Foundations in Locke's Political Thought (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002), Pp. XII + 263. Utilitas 17 (3):357-359.score: 120.0
  36. Serge Pukas (2007). Waldron's Defence of the Natural Duty of Justice Revisited. Ethical Perspectives 14 (1):29-51.score: 120.0
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  37. Edward E. Waldron (1985). Scientist or Humanist: Two Views of the Military Surgeon in Literature. Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 6 (2):64-73.score: 120.0
    Surgeons have often been portrayed in literature on one of two extremes: the cold, distant scientist or the benign, caring humanist. Two characters in American literature who illustrate those extremes, both surgeons in the military, are Herman Melville's Cadwallader Cuticle and Richard Hooker's Hawkeye Pierce. Cuticle is interested only in the science of his craft, while Pierce maintains the compassion so central to the art of healing, even in the midst of war.
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  38. Gregory J. Robson (2012). A Better Basis for Liberal Equality? Waldron's Locke and the Rawlsian Alternative. Locke Studies 12:149-182.score: 120.0
     
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  39. Adrian M. Viens (2004). Jeremy Waldron, God, Locke, and Equality: Christian Foundations in Locke's Political Thought Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 24 (3):230-231.score: 120.0
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  40. D. J. Dietrich (2004). God, Locke, and Equality: Christian Foundations in Locke's Political Thought. By Jeremy Waldron. The European Legacy 9:545-545.score: 120.0
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  41. R. Fairbanks (2005). Jeremy Waldron: God, Locke, and Equality: Christian Foundations In Locke's Political Thought; and Ross Harrison: Hobbes, Locke, and Confusion's Masterpiece: An Examination of Seventeenth-Century Political Philosophy. Faith and Philosophy 22 (2).score: 120.0
     
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  42. B. O'Connor (1999). Liberty and Liberal Constraints: Jeremy Waldron's Liberal Rights. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 7:243-250.score: 120.0
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  43. Jeremy Waldron (2006). Did Dworkin Ever Answer the Crits? In Scott Hershovitz (ed.), Exploring Law's Empire: The Jurisprudence of Ronald Dworkin. Oxford University Press.score: 120.0
     
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  44. Jeremy Waldron (2007). Mill on Liberty and on the Contagious Diseases Acts. In Nadia Urbinati & Alex Zakaras (eds.), J.S. Mill's Political Thought: A Bicentennial Reassessment. Cambridge University Press.score: 120.0
  45. Jeremy Waldron (2001). Normative (or Ethical) Positivism. In Jules L. Coleman (ed.), Hart's Postscript: Essays on the Postscript to `the Concept of Law'. Oup Oxford.score: 120.0
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  46. Charles Pigden (2011). Getting the Wrong Anderson? A Short and Opinionated History of New Zealand Philosophy. In Graham Oppy & Nick Trakakis (eds.), The Antipodean Philosopher: Public Lectures on Philosophy in Australia and New Zealand. Lexington Books. 169-195.score: 99.0
    Is the history of philosophy primarily a contribution to PHILOSOPHY or primarily a contribution to HISTORY? This paper is primarily contribution to history (specifically the history of New Zealand) but although the history of philosophy has been big in New Zealand, most NZ philosophers with a historical bent are primarily interested in the history of philosophy as a contribution to philosophy. My essay focuses on two questions: 1) How did New Zealand philosophy get to be so good? And why, given (...)
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  47. A. Kavanagh (2003). Participation and Judicial Review: A Reply to Jeremy Waldron. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 22 (5):451-486.score: 54.0
    This article challenges Jeremy Waldron's arguments in favour of participatory majoritarianism, and against constitutional judicial review. First, I consider and critique Waldron's arguments against instrumentalist justifications of political authority. My central claim is that although the right to democratic participation is intrinsically valuable, it does not displace the central importance of the `instrumental condition of good government': political decision-making mechanisms should be chosen (primarily) on the basis of their conduciveness to good results. I then turn to an examination (...)
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  48. Timothy Stanton (2011). Christian Foundations; or Some Loose Stones? Toleration and the Philosophy of Locke's Politics. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (3):323-347.score: 54.0
    This essay disputes one of the central claims in Jeremy Waldron?s God, Locke, and Equality (2002), that being the claim that Locke?s arguments about species in An Essay Concerning Human Understanding undercut his assertions about the equality of the human species as a matter of natural law in Two Treatises of Government. It argues, firstly, and pace Waldron, that Locke?s view of natural law is foundational to his view of man, not vice versa, and, secondly, that Two Treatises (...)
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  49. Susan Mendus (2014). Professor Waldron Goes to Washington. Criminal Law and Philosophy 8 (1):123-134.score: 54.0
    In Torture, Terror and Trade-Offs: Philosophy for the White House Jeremy Waldron asks how moral philosophy can illuminate real life political problems. He argues that moral philosophers should remind politicians of the importance of adhering to moral principle, and he also argues that some moral principles are absolute and exceptionless. Thus, he is very critical of those philosophers who, post 9/11, were willing to condone the use of torture. In this article I discuss and criticize Waldron’s absolutism. In (...)
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  50. Greg Conti (forthcoming). Lockean Toleration and the Victim's Perspective. European Journal of Political Theory:1474885114523940.score: 54.0
    According to Jeremy Waldron, John Locke's argument for the instrumental irrationality of persecution is fatally flawed. In this paper, I offer evidence that Waldron has misread Locke, and that Locke's views about why persecution generally proves inefficacious have greater plausibility than Waldron allowed. Locke's argument for the irrationality of intolerance does not, as has been thought, rest on a tendentious ontological distinction between ‘the will’ and ‘the understanding’, but on an account of the adverse psychological reaction of (...)
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