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  1. Tao Gong, James W. Minett & William Sy Wang (2009). A Simulation Study on Word Order Bias. Interaction Studies 10 (1):51-76.
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  2. Tao Gong, Andrea Puglisi, Vittorio Loreto & William S.-Y. Wang (2008). Conventionalization of Linguistic Knowledge Under Communicative Constraints. Biological Theory 3 (2):154-163.
  3. William L. Wang (2008). A New Analysis on Metaphysics and Ontology. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 15:243-252.
    By means of comparison between Lao Tzu’s theory of Tao in ancient China and the concept of metaphysics originated from ancient Greece, the author redefined the concept of “form” and therefore, elaborated the meaning of metaphysics from its Chinese translation. According to the author’s re-interpretation of Tao Te Ching, Lao Tzu had resolved the ontological questions in a different way with that of ancient Greek philosophers, and he had answered the question of “One and Many”. In the past, people had (...)
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  4. Tao Gong, Jinyun Ke, James W. Minett, John H. Holland & William S. Y. Wang (2005). A Computational Model of the Coevolution of Lexicon and Syntax. Complexity 10:50-62.
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  5. Tao Gong, James W. Minett, Jinyun Ke, John H. Holland & William S.‐Y. Wang (2005). Coevolution of Lexicon and Syntax From a Simulation Perspective. Complexity 10 (6):50-62.
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  6. William S.-Y. Wang & Tao Gong (2005). Categorization in Artificial Agents: Guidance on Empirical Research? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):511-512.
    By comparing mechanisms in nativism, empiricism, and culturalism, the target article by Steels & Belpaeme (S&B) emphasizes the influence of communicational constraint on sharing color categories. Our commentary suggests deeper considerations of some of their claims, and discusses some modifications that may help in the study of communicational constraints in both humans and robots.
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  7. Jinyun Ke, James W. Minett, Ching‐Pong Au & William S.‐Y. Wang (2002). Self‐Organization and Selection in the Emergence of Vocabulary. Complexity 7 (3):41-54.
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  8. William S.-Y. Wang & Jinyun Ke (2002). Language Heterogeneity and Self-Organizing Consciousness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):358-359.
    While the current generative paradigm in linguistics leans heavily toward computation, investigations on conscious representations are much welcome. The SOC model examines the acquisition of complex representations in individuals. We note that heterogeneity of representation in populations is a central issue that must be addressed as well. In addition to the self-organizing processes proposed for the individual, interactions among individuals must be incorporated in any comprehensive account of language.
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  9. David A. Freedman & William Wang (1996). Language Polygenesis: A Probabilistic Model. Philosophical Explorations.
    Monogenesis of language is widely accepted, but the conventional argument seems to be mistaken; a simple probabilistic model shows that polygenesis is likely. Other prehistoric inventions are discussed, as are problems in tracing linguistic lineages. Language is a system of representations; within such a system, words can evoke complex and systematic responses. Along with its social functions, language is important to humans as a mental instrument. Indeed, the invention of language,that is the accumulation of symbols to represent emotions, objects, and (...)
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  10. P. Thomas Schoenemann & William S.-Y. Wang (1996). Evolutionary Principles and the Emergence of Syntax. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):646.
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  11. Larry Alexander & William Wang (1984). Natural Advantages and Contractual Justice. Law and Philosophy 3 (2):281 - 297.
    Anthony Kronman has argued that libertarians cannot distinguish non-arbitrarily between legitimate and illegitimate advantage-taking in contractual relations except by reference to a liberal, wealth-redistributive standard Kronman calls paretianism. We argue to the contrary that libertarians need not concede that any advantage-taking in contracts is legitimate and thus need not be liberal paretians with respect to advantage-taking.
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  12. William S.-Y. Wang (1984). Organum Ex Machina? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):210.
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