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  1. William Werpehowski (2012). Talking the Walk and Walking the Talk: Stanley Hauerwas's Contribution to Theological Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (2):228-249.
    Stanley Hauerwas's contribution to the study of Christian ethics is analyzed in the course of offering an overview of his work, including (1) his early reflections on “vision,”“narrative,” and moral agency; (2) his continuing focus on Christian virtues and practices in contrast to the ethos of moral and political liberalism; and (3) his specific attention to the meaning of peaceableness and the rejection of violence. The essay concludes by considering Hauerwas's legacy as a postliberal theologian, a critical participant in American (...)
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  2. William Werpehowski (2007). Anders Nygren, Agape and Eros. In Gilbert Meilaender & William Werpehowski (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Theological Ethics. Oup Oxford.
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  3. Gilbert Meilaender & William Werpehowski (eds.) (2005). The Oxford Handbook of Theological Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    The Oxford Handbooks series is a major new initiative in academic publishing. Each volume offers an authoritative and up-to-date survey of original research in a particular subject area. Specially commissioned essays from leading figures in the discipline give critical examinations of the progress and direction of debates. The Oxford Handbook of Theological Ethics offers the most authoritative and compelling guide to the discipline. Thirty of the world's most distinguished specialists provide new essays in order to offer a survey of and (...)
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  4. William Werpehowski (1997). The Vocation of Parenthood: A Response to Stephen Post. Journal of Religious Ethics 25 (1):177 - 182.
    Extending his work on the nature and significance of family life, Stephen Post has now drawn our attention to the important problem of Christian attitudes toward relinquishment and adoption. Though he describes his approach as theological, I take it to be more straightforwardly moral, and as a moral argument, it fails to give sufficient attention to the moral cost of relinquishment to the child. A genuinely theological reconsideration of relinquishment and adoption would, however, be valuable; in order to achieve that, (...)
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  5. William Werpehowski (1992). The Ethics of St. Augustine. Augustinian Studies 23:167-171.
  6. William Werpehowski (1986). Justification and Justice in the Theology of Karl Barth. The Thomist 50 (4):623-642.
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  7. Edmund N. Santurri & William Werpehowski (1982). Substituted Judgment and the Terminally-Ill Incompetent. Thought 57 (4):484-501.
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