Search results for 'William of Ockham' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Thomas M. Osborne Jr (2014). Human Action in Thomas Aquinas, John Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham. The Catholic University of America Press.score: 720.0
    Thomas M. Osborne Jr. ... Vivarium 32 (1994): 62–71. te Velde, Rude A. “Natura in se ipsa recurva est: Duns Scotus and Aquinas on the Relationship between Nature and Will.” In John Duns Scotus: ... “William of Ockham's Theological Ethics .
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  2. Sharon M. Kaye (2006). Was There No Evolutionary Thought in the Middle Ages? The Case of William of Ockham. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (2):225 – 244.score: 549.0
    (2006). Was there no evolutionary thought in the middle ages? The case of William of Ockham. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 14, No. 2, pp. 225-244.
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  3. Sharon Kaye (1999). Russell, Strawson, and William of Ockham. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 1999:207-216.score: 549.0
    Realism and conventionalism generally establish the parameters of debate over universals. Do abstract terms in language refer to abstract things in the world? The realist answers yes, leaving us with an inflated ontology; the conventionalist answers no, leaving us with subjective categories. I want to defend nominalism in its original medieval sense, as one possibility that aims to preserve objectivity while positing nothing more than concrete individuals in the world. First, I will present paradigmatic statements of realism and conventionalism as (...)
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  4. Sharon Kaye (2007). William of Ockham and the Unlikely Connection Between Transubstantiation and Free Will. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 81:123-132.score: 549.0
    William of Ockham was tried for heresy due to his assertion that certain qualities can exist independently of substances. Scholars have assumed he made thisstrange assertion in order to account for the Catholic doctrine of transubstantiation. I argue, however, that the assertion was philosophically rather than theologically motivated. Ockham develops a nominalist substance ontology, according to which most changes can be explained as the result of local motion. Knowledge and virtue are changes in human beings that cannot (...)
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  5. Stephen F. Brown (2010). William of Ockham and St. Augustine on Proper and Improper Statements. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 84:57-64.score: 549.0
    William of Ockham discussed the fallacy of amphiboly twice in his writings. The first treatment was in his Expositio super libros Elenchorum, where he simply presents Aristotle’s treatment, updates it with some Latin examples, and tells us it is not too important, since we do not often run into cases of ambiguity of thiskind. Later, in his Summa logicae, however, he extends his treatment appreciably. He here includes under ambiguous statements philosophical and theological sentences which are improperly stated. (...)
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  6. Takashi Shogimen (1998). William of Ockham and Guido Terreni. History of Political Thought 19 (4):517-530.score: 549.0
    This paper is intended to offer an analysis of William of Ockham's and Guido Terreni's discourses on papal authority; it illuminates how their polemical use of the same authority -- Thomas Aquinas -- resulted in two diametrically opposed views. Guido Terreni's precarious understanding of Aquinas' commentary on the gospel of Luke stretched papal authority on doctrinal definition to the point of papal infallibility. Whereas, William of Ockham's use (and transformation) of Aquinas' idea of the object of (...)
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  7. Roberto Lambertini (2006). Francis of Marchia and William of Ockham: Fragments From a Dialogue. Vivarium 44 (1):184-204.score: 540.0
    It is well known that Francis of Marchia and William of Ockham joined Michael of Cesena's rebellion against the pope, together escaping from Avignon and signing documents supporting Cesena's defence of Franciscan poverty. The relationship between the works of the two thinkers, on the other hand, is the subject of ongoing investigation. After discussing Francis' rejection in his Commentary on the Sentences of Ockham's theory of quantity, this paper shows how Francis' Improbatio became a source for (...)'s Opus Nonaginta Dierum. Building on Offler's ground-breaking critical edition of the latter work, it is argued that Ockham made extensive use of Francis' Improbatio, even though on several points he felt it necessary to reformulate the arguments of his confrère or even to substantially modify his positions. The two Franciscan theologians differed deeply both in their basic philosophical commitments and in their methodological attitude. These differences emerged even when they were—so to speak—fighting on the same front. (shrink)
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  8. Arthur Stephen McGrade (1974). The Political Thought of William of Ockham. New York]Cambridge University Press.score: 540.0
    The English Franciscan, William of Ockham (c. 1285-1349), was one of the most important thinkers of the later middle ages. Summoned to Avignon in 1324 to answer charges of heresy, Ockham became convinced that Pope John XXII was himself a heretic in denying the complete poverty of Christ and the apostles and a tyrant in claiming supremacy over the Roman empire. Ockham's political writings were a result of these personal convictions, but also include systematic discourses on (...)
     
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  9. John Scott (2011). William of Ockham: Dialogus: Part 2; Part 3, Tract 1. OUP/British Academy.score: 540.0
    William of Ockham was a medieval English philosopher and theologian (he was born about 1285, perhaps as late as 1288, and died in 1347 or 1348). In 1328 Ockham turned away from 'pure' philosophy and theology to polemic. From that year until the end of his life he worked to overthrow what he saw as the tyranny of Pope John XXII (1316-1334) and of his successors Popes Benedict XII (1334-1342) and Clement VI (1342-1352). This campaign led him (...)
     
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  10. Takashi Shogimen (2005). Defending Christian Fellowship: William of Ockham and the Crisis of the Medieval Church. History of Political Thought 26 (4):607-624.score: 501.0
    Modern scholarship on Ockham's political thought suggests that his anti-papal polemical activities were intended to be destructive. A close analysis of Ockham's Dialogus, Part I in particular, reveals that the truth is just opposite: the reality as Ockham saw it was that the ecclesiastical institution had already broken down due to the heresy of the contemporary popes. Ockham thus proposed an alternative -- non-institutional -- vision of the Christian society; drawing on the Ambrosian (and Ciceronian) discourse (...)
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  11. Adam Wood (2013). William of Ockham on Metaphysics: The Science of Being and God by Jenny E. Pelletier (Review). [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (4):679-680.score: 495.0
    Ockham never wrote a commentary on Aristotle’s Metaphysics,” Jenny Pelletier tells us at the beginning of this monograph, “but the absence of such a commentary does not allow us to infer that he was uninterested in or skeptical of metaphysics” (1–2). Her central contention is that Ockham had a robust conception of metaphysics as a distinct branch of scientific knowledge concerning being and God. It is an argument worth making insofar as many scholars in recent years have held (...)
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  12. Jenny E. Pelletier (2012). William Ockham on Metaphysics: The Science of Being and God. Brill.score: 492.0
    In William Ockham on Metaphysics, Jenny E. Pelletier gives an account of Ockham's concept of metaphysics as the science of being and God as it emerges sporadically throughout his philosophical and theological work.
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  13. Gordon Leff (1975). William of Ockham: The Metamorphosis of Scholastic Discourse. Rowman and Littlefield.score: 486.0
    CHAPTER ONE Simple cognition Ockham's epistemology is founded upon the primacy of individual cognition. As coming first in the order of knowing, ...
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  14. Alfred J. Freddoso, William of Ockham (C. 1285 - 1347).score: 486.0
    Born in England and educated at Oxford, Ockham was the preeminent Franciscan thinker of the mid-fourteenth century. Because of his role in the bitter dispute between the Franciscans and Pope John XXII over evangelical poverty, he was excommunicated in 1328. After that he abandoned philosophy and theology proper, producing instead a series of political tracts on the ecclesiastical and secular power of the papacy.
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  15. Jt Paasch (2012). Divine Production in Late Medieval Trinitarian Theology: Henry of Ghent, Duns Scotus, and William Ockham. Oxford University Press.score: 486.0
    According to the doctrine of the Trinity, the Father, Son, and Spirit are supposed to be distinct from each other, and yet be one and the same God. As if that were not perplexing enough, there is also supposed to be an internal process of production that gives rise to the Son and Spirit: the Son is said to be 'begotten' by the Father, while the Spirit is said to 'proceed' either from the Father and the Son together, or from (...)
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  16. John Kilcullen, William of Ockham and Early Christianity.score: 486.0
    My talk tonight comes under the heading of history of theology. It may take you away somewhat from the study of early Christianity, but perhaps it can come under the head of the history of the history of early Christianity—my topic is a dispute involving Marsilius and Ockham over Peter’s role in the early Church and the use Ockham made of early Christian documents, or what he thought were such.
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  17. Marilyn McCord Adams (2010). Some Later Medieval Theories of the Eucharist: Thomas Aquinas, Gilles of Rome, Duns Scotus, and William Ockham. [REVIEW] OUP Oxford.score: 486.0
    How can the Body and Blood of Christ, without ever leaving heaven, come to be really present on eucharistic altars where the bread and wine still seem to be? Thirteenth and fourteenth century Christian Aristotelians thought the answer had to be "transubstantiation." -/- Acclaimed philosopher, Marilyn McCord Adams, investigates these later medieval theories of the Eucharist, concentrating on the writings of Thomas Aquinas, Giles of Rome, Duns Scotus, and William Ockham, with some reference to Peter Lombard, Hugh of (...)
     
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  18. Farewell to the Twentieth Century: Nussbaum Glossary of Philosophical Terms Selected Bibliography Index (2009). Machine Generated Contents Note: Introduction1. The Pre-Socratic Philosophers: Sixth and Fifth Centuries B.C.E. Thales / Anaximander / Anaximenes / Pythagoras / Xenophanes / Heraclitus / Parmenides / Zeno / Empedocles / Anaxagoras / Leucippus and Democritus 2. The Athenian Period: Fifth and Fourth Centuries B.C.E. The Sophists: Protagoras, Gorgias, Thrasymachus, Callicles and Critias / Socrates / Plato / Aristotle 3. The Hellenistic and Roman Periods: Fourth Century B.C.E Through Fourth Century C.E. Epicureanism / Stoicism / Skepticism / neoPlatonism 4. Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy: Fifth Through Fifteenth Centuries Saint Augustine / the Encyclopediasts / John Scotus Eriugena / Saint Anselm / Muslim and Jewish Philosophies: Averroës, Maimonides / the Problem of Faith and Reason / the Problem of the Universals / Saint Thomas Aquinas / William of Ockham / Renaissance Philosophers 5. Continental Rationalism and British Empiricism: The Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries Descartes. [REVIEW] In Donald Palmer (ed.), Looking at Philosophy: The Unbearable Heaviness of Philosophy Made Lighter. Mcgraw-Hill.score: 468.0
     
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  19. Peter King, William of Ockham: Ordinatio 1 D. 2 Q.score: 459.0
    That it is: According to the Commentator, Met. 7 com. 11 ([Iuntina 8 fol. 76r]): The definition is the same as the substance of the thing. Hence it is in some way outside the soul, and consequently all its parts are in some way outside the soul. But the definition is composed of universals. Hence [the universal is outside the soul].
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  20. Sharon Kaye (1998). There's No Such Thing as Heresy (and It's a Good Thing, Too): William of Ockham on Freedom of Speech. Journal of Political Philosophy 6 (1):41–52.score: 459.0
  21. John Kilcullen, INTRODUCTION to William of Ockham, The Work of Ninety Days.score: 459.0
    Saint Francis's desire to follow the life of Jesus made him go to great lengths to dissociate himself from power, property and legal rights of any kind. The witness to Christian humility that his small group gave was so attractive to his contemporaries that soon his fellowship became a large organisation entrusted by the Church with a preaching mission throughout Europe and beyond. By 1300 there were Franciscans in Beijing.
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  22. T. Bruce Birch (1936). The Theory of Continuity of William of Ockham. Philosophy of Science 3 (4):494-505.score: 459.0
  23. Prefatory Letter, William of Ockham, From His Summa of Logic, Part.score: 459.0
    ence of language that we call “logic” brings forth for the followers of truth, while reason and experience clearly confirm and prove [it].2 Hence Aristotle, the main originator of this science, calls [it] now an introductory method, now a way of knowing, now a science common to all [things] and the way to truth. By these [phrases] he indicates that the entryway to wis-.
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  24. Paul Vincent Spade, William of Ockham De Insolubilibus.score: 459.0
    From Guillelmi de Ockham, Summa logicae, Philotheus Boehner, Gedeon Gál and Stephanus Brown, ed., (“Guillelmi de Ockham Opera philosophica et theologica,” OPh I; St. Bonaventure, N.Y.: The Franciscan Institute, 1974), pp. 744–.
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  25. Hester Goodenough Gelber (1987). The Physics of William of Ockham. Journal of the History of Philosophy 25 (2):294-296.score: 459.0
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  26. Sharon Kaye, William of Ockham (C. 1280 - C. 1349). Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 459.0
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  27. Alexander W. Hall (2008). Demonstration and Scientific Knowledge in William of Ockham: A Translation of Summa Logicae III-II: De Syllogismo Demonstrativo, and Selections From the Prologue to the Ordinatio (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (1):170-172.score: 459.0
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  28. Marilyn McCord Adams (1977). William of Ockham: The Metamorphosis of Scholastic Discourse (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 15 (3):334-339.score: 459.0
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  29. Joseph T. Clark (1952). William of Ockham and Consequentiae. Philosophical Studies of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 3:54-55.score: 459.0
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  30. Stephen F. Brown (2011). William of Ockham. In H. Lagerlund (ed.), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy. Springer. 1410--1416.score: 459.0
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  31. C. Delisle Burns (1913). William of Ockham on Universals. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 14:76 - 99.score: 459.0
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  32. John Corcoran (1981). Review: Michael J. Loux, The Ontology of William of Ockham. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 46 (3):667-668.score: 459.0
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  33. K. McDonnell (1971). William of Ockham and Situation Ethics. American Journal of Jurisprudence 16 (1):25-35.score: 459.0
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  34. Cesare Vasoli (1976). The Political Thought of William of Ockham: Personal and Institutional Principles. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 14 (2):230-233.score: 459.0
  35. Stephen F. Brown (1994). William of Ockham: Quodlibetal Questions (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (3):493-494.score: 459.0
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  36. Virpi Mäkinen (2012). William of Ockham, Dialogus, Part 2, Part 3, Tract 1 (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (4):615-616.score: 459.0
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  37. Timothy Noone (2001). Maurer, Armand. The Philosophy of William of Ockham: In the Light of its Principles. Review of Metaphysics 54 (4):926-930.score: 459.0
  38. F. Oakley (1961). Medieval Theories of Natural Law: William of Ockham and the Significance of the Voluntarist Tradition. American Journal of Jurisprudence 6 (1):65-83.score: 459.0
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  39. Robert Pasnau (2000). The Philosophy of William of Ockham in the Light of Its Principles (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (4):590-591.score: 459.0
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  40. B. W. A. (1976). William of Ockham. Review of Metaphysics 29 (3):552-553.score: 459.0
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  41. John Corcoran (1984). Review: Alfred J. Freddoso, William of Ockham, Henry Schuurman, Ockham's Theory of Truth Conditions. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 49 (1):306-308.score: 459.0
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  42. William J. Courtenay (1987). André Goddu, The Physics of William of Ockham. (Studien Und Texte Zur Geistesgeschichte des Mittelalters, 16.) Leiden and Cologne: E. J. Brill, 1984. Paper. Pp. X, 243. Hfl 84. [REVIEW] Speculum 62 (2):416-418.score: 459.0
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  43. Claus Dierksmeier (2013). Scholastic Business Ethics: Thomas Aquinas Versus William of Ockham. In Christopher Luetege (ed.), Handbook of the Philosophical Foundations of Business Ethics. Springer. 159--178.score: 459.0
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  44. P. G. Leite Júnior (2007). Univocity of Being in William of Ockham's Thought: A First Approach. In Roberto Hofmeister Pich (ed.), New Essays on Metaphysics as "Scientia Transcendens": Proceedings of the Second International Conference of Medieval Philosophy, Held at the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande Do Sul (Pucrs), Porto Alegre/Brazil, 15-18 August 2006. Fédération Internationale des Instituts d'Études Médiévales.score: 459.0
  45. Sharon Marie Kaye (2013). William of Ockham on Metaphysics. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (4):798-800.score: 459.0
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  46. C. H. Langford (1943). Review: Ruth L. Saw, William of Ockham on Terms, Propositions, Meanings. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 8 (4):147-147.score: 459.0
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  47. Ernest A. Moody (1967). William of Ockham. In Paul Edwards (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Philosophy. New York, Macmillan. 8--306.score: 459.0
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  48. Timothy B. Noone (1994). William of Ockham and the Divine Freedom. Review of Metaphysics 48 (1):142-144.score: 459.0
  49. Claude Panaccio (2003). William of Ockham., Summa Logicae (Ca. 1324). In Jorge J. E. Gracia, Gregory M. Reichberg & Bernard N. Schumacher (eds.), The Classics of Western Philosophy: A Reader's Guide. Blackwell Pub.. 177--182.score: 459.0
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  50. Spade Pv (forthcoming). William of Ockham. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 459.0
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