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David Sloan Wilson [50]Deirdre Wilson [38]David Wilson [20]David B. Wilson [15]
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Profile: Deirdre Wilson (University College London)
Profile: David Wilson
Profile: Daniel Wilson
Profile: Duncan Wilson (University of Nevada, Reno)
Profile: Daniel Wilson (California State University)
Profile: Daniel Wilson (Azusa Pacific University)
Profile: Dawn M Wilson (nee Phillips) (University of Hull)
Profile: Daniel Patrick Wilson (University of Auckland)
Profile: Dom Wilson (Nottingham University)
Profile: Donald Wilson (Kansas State University)
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  1. Dan Sperber & Deirdre Wilson (1986). Relevance Communication and Cognition.
     
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  2. Elliott Sober & David Sloan Wilson (1998). Unto Others: The Evolution and Psychology of Unselfish Behavior. Harvard University Press.
  3.  13
    D. Sperber & D. Wilson (1995). Relevance. Blackwell.
    This revised edition includes a new Preface outlining developments in Relevance Theory since 1986, discussing the more serious criticisms of the theory, and ...
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  4.  70
    Dan Sperber, Fabrice Clément, Christophe Heintz, Olivier Mascaro, Hugo Mercier, Gloria Origgi & Deirdre Wilson (2010). Epistemic Vigilance. Mind and Language 25 (4):359-393.
    Humans massively depend on communication with others, but this leaves them open to the risk of being accidentally or intentionally misinformed. To ensure that, despite this risk, communication remains advantageous, humans have, we claim, a suite of cognitive mechanisms for epistemic vigilance. Here we outline this claim and consider some of the ways in which epistemic vigilance works in mental and social life by surveying issues, research and theories in different domains of philosophy, linguistics, cognitive psychology and the social sciences.
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  5. Deirdre Wilson & Dan Sperber (2004). Relevance Theory. In L. Horn & G. Ward (eds.), The Handbook of Pragmatics. Blackwell 607-632.
  6.  19
    Deirdre Wilson & Dan Sperber (2012). Meaning and Relevance. Cambridge University Press.
    When people speak, their words never fully encode what they mean, and the context is always compatible with a variety of interpretations. How can comprehension ever be achieved? Wilson and Sperber argue that comprehension is an inference process guided by precise expectations of relevance. What are the relations between the linguistically encoded meanings studied in semantics and the thoughts that humans are capable of entertaining and conveying? How should we analyse literal meaning, approximations, metaphors and ironies? Is the ability to (...)
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  7.  57
    David Sloan Wilson & Elliott Sober (1994). Reintroducing Group Selection to the Human Behavioral Sciences. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):585.
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  8. David A. H. Wilson (2009). Racial Prejudice and the Performing Animals Controversy in Early Twentieth-Century Britain. Society and Animals 17 (2):149-165.
    This paper attempts to show how racial prejudice and selective, usually inarticulate, racial discrimination influenced attempts to conduct an objective examination of charges of cruelty in the training and exhibition of performing animals in Britain in the early twentieth century. As the debate intensified, and following the appointment of a parliamentary Select Committee, one explanation often given by both sides for shortcomings in the treatment of performing animals was the alleged cruelty particularly or exclusively attributable to the “alien enemy,” “foreigners,” (...)
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  9.  61
    Dan Sperber & Deirdre Wilson (2002). Pragmatics, Modularity and Mind-Reading. Mind and Language 17 (1&2):3-23.
    The central problem for pragmatics is that sentence meaning vastly underdetermines speaker’s meaning. The goal of pragmatics is to explain how the gap between sentence meaning and speaker’s meaning is bridged. This paper defends the broadly Gricean view that pragmatic interpretation is ultimately an exercise in mind-reading, involving the inferential attribution of intentions. We argue, however, that the interpretation process does not simply consist in applying general mind-reading abilities to a particular (communicative) domain. Rather, it involves a dedicated comprehension module, (...)
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  10. Robyn Carston & Deidre Wilson (2006). Metaphor, Relevance and the `Emergent Property' Issue. Mind and Language 21 (3):404--433.
  11.  77
    Dan Sperber & Deirdre Wilson (2002). Pragmatics, Modularity and Mind-Reading. Mind and Language 17 (1&2):3–23.
    The central problem for pragmatics is that sentence meaning vastly underdetermines speaker’s meaning. The goal of pragmatics is to explain how the gap between sentence meaning and speaker’s meaning is bridged. This paper defends the broadly Gricean view that pragmatic interpretation is ultimately an exercise in mind-reading, involving the inferential attribution of intentions. We argue, however, that the interpretation process does not simply consist in applying general mind-reading abilities to a particular (communicative) domain. Rather, it involves a dedicated comprehension module, (...)
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  12. Elliott Sober & David Sloan Wilson (1994). A Critical Review of Philosophical Work on the Units of Selection Problem. Philosophy of Science 61 (4):534-555.
    The evolutionary problem of the units of selection has elicited a good deal of conceptual work from philosophers. We review this work to determine where the issues now stand.
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  13.  24
    Dan Sperber & Deirdre Wilson (1987). Précis of Relevance: Communication and Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):697.
  14. Deirdre Wilson & Robyn Carston (2006). Metaphor, Relevance and the 'Emergent Property' Issue. Mind and Language 21 (3):404–433.
    The interpretation of metaphorical utterances often results in the attribution of emergent properties, which are neither standardly associated with the individual constituents in isolation nor derivable by standard rules of semantic composition. An adequate pragmatic account of metaphor interpretation must explain how these properties are derived. Using the framework of relevance theory, we propose a wholly inferential account, and argue that the derivation of emergent properties involves no special interpretive mechanisms not required for the interpretation of ordinary, literal utterances.
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  15.  68
    David Sloan Wilson (1992). On the Relationship Between Evolutionary and Psychological Definitions of Altruism and Selfishness. Biology and Philosophy 7 (1):61-68.
    I examine the relationship between evolutionary definitions of altruism that are based on fitness effects and psychological definitions that are based on the motives of the actor. I show that evolutionary altruism can be motivated by proximate mechanisms that are psychologically either altruistic or selfish. I also show that evolutionary definitions do rely upon motives as a metaphor in which the outcome of natural selection is compared to the decisions of a psychologically selfish (or altruistic) individual. Ignoring the precise nature (...)
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  16.  70
    Deirdre Wilson & Dan Sperber (2002). Truthfulness and Relevance. Mind 111 (443):632583-.
    This paper questions the widespread view that verbal communication is governed by a maxim, norm or convention of truthfulness which applies at the level of what is literally meant, or what is said. Pragmatic frameworks based on this view must explain the frequent occurrence and acceptability of loose and figurative uses of language. We argue against existing explanations of these phenomena and provide an alternative account, based on the assumption that verbal communication is governed not by expectations of truthfulness but (...)
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  17. Dan Sperber & Deirdre Wilson, A Deflationary Account of Metaphor.
    On the relevance-theoretic approach outlined in this paper, linguistic metaphors are not a natural kind, and ―metaphor‖ is not a theoretically important notion in the study of verbal communication. Metaphorical interpretations are arrived at in exactly the same way as literal, loose and hyperbolic interpretations: there is no mechanism specific to metaphors, and no interesting generalisation that applies only to them. In this paper, we defend this approach in detail by showing how the same inferential procedure applies to utterances at (...)
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  18. Elliott Sober & David Sloan Wilson (2000). Summary Of: ‘Unto Others. The Evolution and Psychology of Unselfish Behavior'. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (1-2):185-206.
    The hypothesis of group selection fell victim to a seemingly devastating critique in 1960s evolutionary biology. In Unto Others (1998), we argue to the contrary, that group selection is a conceptually coherent and empirically well documented cause of evolution. We suggest, in addition, that it has been especially important in human evolution. In the second part of Unto Others, we consider the issue of psychological egoism and altruism -- do human beings have ultimate motives concerning the well-being of others? We (...)
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  19.  2
    David Sloan Wilson (2007). Evolution for Everyone: How Darwin's Theory Can Change the Way We Think About Our Lives. Delacorte Press.
    What is the biological reason for gossip? For laughter? For the creation of art? Why do dogs have curly tails? What can microbes tell us about morality? These and many other questions are tackled by renowned evolutionist David Sloan Wilson in this witty and groundbreaking new book. With stories that entertain as much as they inform, Wilson outlines the basic principles of evolution and shows how, properly understood, they can illuminate the length and breadth of creation, from the origin of (...)
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  20. David Sloan Wilson, Eric Dietrich & Anne B. Clark (2003). On the Inappropriate Use of the Naturalistic Fallacy in Evolutionary Psychology. Biology and Philosophy 18 (5):669-81.
    The naturalistic fallacy is mentionedfrequently by evolutionary psychologists as anerroneous way of thinking about the ethicalimplications of evolved behaviors. However,evolutionary psychologists are themselvesconfused about the naturalistic fallacy and useit inappropriately to forestall legitimateethical discussion. We briefly review what thenaturalistic fallacy is and why it is misusedby evolutionary psychologists. Then we attemptto show how the ethical implications of evolvedbehaviors can be discussed constructivelywithout impeding evolutionary psychologicalresearch. A key is to show how ethicalbehaviors, in addition to unethical behaviors,can evolve by natural selection.
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  21.  64
    Dan Sperber & Deirdre Wilson (1986). Loose Talk. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 86:153--171.
  22.  25
    Duncan Wilson (2013). What Can History Do for Bioethics? Bioethics 27 (4):215-223.
    This article details the relationship between history and bioethics. I argue that historians' reluctance to engage with bioethics rests on a misreading of the field as solely reducible to applied ethics, and overlooks previous enthusiasm for historical perspectives. I claim that seeing bioethics as its practitioners see it – as an interdisciplinary meeting ground – should encourage historians to collaborate in greater numbers. I conclude by outlining how bioethics might benefit from new histories of the field, and how historians can (...)
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  23.  69
    Duncan Wilson (2009). Book Review: When Species Meet Donna Haraway, When Species Meet. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2008. ISBN 978-0-8166-5046-0. X + 420 Pp. $24.95. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 22 (1):149-155.
  24. Deirdre Wilson & Robyn Carston (2007). A Unitary Approach to Lexical Pragmatics: Relevance, Inference and Ad Hoc Concepts. In Noel Burton-Roberts (ed.), Pragmatics. Palgrave Macmillan 3.
     
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  25.  2
    Dan Sperber & Deirdre Wilson (1981). Pragmatics. Cognition 10 (1-3):281-286.
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  26.  27
    Deirdre Wilson & Dan Sperber (1988). Mood and the Analysis of Non-Declarative Sentences. In J. Dancy, J. M. E. Moravcsik & C. C. W. Taylor (eds.), Human Agency: Language, Duty, and Value. Stanford University Press 77--101.
    How are non-declarative sentences understood? How do they differ semantically from their declarative counterparts? Answers to these questions once made direct appeal to the notion of illocutionary force. When they proved unsatisfactory, the fault was diagnosed as a failure to distinguish properly between mood and force. For some years now, efforts have been under way to develop a satisfactory account of the semantics of mood. In this paper, we consider the current achievements and future prospects of the mood-based semantic programme.
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  27.  8
    Daniel Wilson (2015). Can Levinson's Intentional‐Historical Definition of Art Accommodate Revolutionary Art? Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (4):407-416.
    In this article, I examine whether Jerrold Levinson's intentional-historical definition of art can successfully accommodate revolutionary art. For Levinson, an item is art if it was intended to be regarded as some prior art was regarded. But revolutionary art involves a regard that is “completely distinct” from preexisting art regards. I consider and reject Levinson's proposed solutions to the problem of accommodating revolutionary art. I then defend an alternative account of transgressive art regard. Unfortunately for the intentional-historical definition, the acceptance (...)
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  28. Dan Sperber & Deirder Wilson (2005). Pragmatics. In Frank Jackson & Michael Smith (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Contemporary Philosophy. Oxford University Press
     
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  29.  14
    Barbara Oakley, Ariel Knafo, Guruprasad Madhavan & David Sloan Wilson (eds.) (2011). Pathological Altruism. Oxford University Press.
    Pathological Altruism presents a number of new, thought-provoking theses that explore a range of hurtful effects of altruism and empathy.
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  30.  93
    Dan Sperber & Deirdre Wilson (1996). Fodor's Frame Problem and Relevance Theory (Reply to Chiappe & Kukla). Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):530-532.
    Chiappe and Kukla argue that relevance theory fails to solve the frame problem as defined by Fodor. They are right. They are wrong, however, to take Fodor’s frame problem too seriously. Fodor’s concerns, on the other hand, even though they are wrongly framed, are worth addressing. We argue that Relevance thoery helps address them.
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  31.  31
    Deirdre Wilson & Dan Sperber (1993). Linguistic Form and Relevance. Lingua 90:1-25.
    Our book Relevance (Sperber and Wilson 1986) treats utterance interpretation as a two-phase process: a modular decoding phase is seen as providing input to a central inferential phase in which a linguistically encoded logical form is contextually enriched and used to construct a hypothesis about the speaker's informative intention. Relevance was mainly concerned with the inferential phase of comprehension: we had to answer Fodor's challenge that while decoding processes are quite well understood, inferential processes are not only not understood, but (...)
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  32.  17
    David Wilson & William Dixon (2006). Das Adam Smith Problem. Journal of Critical Realism 5 (2):251-272.
    _ Source: _Volume 5, Issue 2, pp 251 - 272 The old _Das Adam Smith Problem_ is no longer tenable. Few today believe that Smith postulates two contradictory principles of human action: one in the _Wealth of Nations_ and another in the _Theory of Moral Sentiments_. Nevertheless, an Adam Smith problem of sorts endures: there is still no widely agreed version of what it is that links these two texts, aside from their common author; no widely agreed version of how, (...)
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  33.  47
    David Sloan Wilson (1990). Species of Thought: A Comment on Evolutionary Epistemology. Biology and Philosophy 5 (1):37-62.
    The primary outcome of natural selection is adaptation to an environment. The primary concern of epistemology is the acquistion of knowledge. Evolutionary epistemology must therefore draw a fundamental connection between adaptation and knowledge. Existing frameworks in evolutionary epistemology do this in two ways; (a) by treating adaptation as a form of knowledge, and (b) by treating the ability to acquire knowledge as a biologically evolved adaptation. I criticize both frameworks for failing to appreciate that mental representations can motivate behaviors that (...)
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  34.  14
    David Sloan Wilson (2005). Testing Major Evolutionary Hypotheses About Religion with a Random Sample. Human Nature 16 (4):382-409.
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  35.  9
    Dan Sperber & Deirdre Wilson (2002). Truthfulness and Relevance. Mind 111 (443):583--632.
    This paper questions the widespread view that verbal communication is governed by a maxim, norm or convention of truthfulness which applies at the level of what is literally meant, or what is said. Pragmatic frameworks based on this view must explain the frequent occurrence and acceptability of loose and figurative uses of language. We argue against existing explanations of these phenomena and provide an alternative account, based on the assumption that verbal communication is governed not by expectations of truthfulness but (...)
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  36.  87
    Michael S. Gazzaniga, J. E. LeDoux & David H. Wilson (1977). Language, Praxis, and the Right Hemisphere: Clues to Some Mechanisms of Consciousness. Neurology 27:1144-1147.
  37.  21
    Deirdre Wilson & Robyn Carston (2008). Metaphor and the 'Emergent Property' Problem: A Relevance-Theoretic Approach. The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 3.
    The interpretation of metaphorical utterances often results in the attribution of emergent properties; these are properties which are neither standardly associated with the individual constituents of the utterance in isolation nor derivable by standard rules of semantic composition. For example, an utterance of ‘Robert is a bulldozer’ may be understood as attributing to Robert such properties as single-mindedness, insistence on having things done in his way, and insensitivity to the opinions/feelings of others, although none of these is included in the (...)
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  38. Deirdre Wilson (1975). Presuppositions and Non-Truth-Conditional Semantics. Academic Press.
     
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  39.  56
    Dan Sperber & Deirdre Wilson (1998). The Mapping Between the Mental and the Public Lexicon. In Peter Carruthers & Jill Boucher (eds.), [Book Chapter]. Cambridge University Press 184-200.
    We argue that the presence of a word in an utterance serves as starting point for a relevance guided inferential process that results in the construction of a contextually appropriate sense. The linguistically encoded sense of a word does not serve as its default interpretation. The cases where the contextually appropriate sense happens to be identical to this linguistic sense have no particular theoretical significance. We explore some of the consequences of this view. One of these consequences is that there (...)
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  40.  13
    Russell Gardner Jr & Daniel R. Wilson (2004). Sociophysiology and Evolutionary Aspects of Psychiatry. In Jaak Panksepp (ed.), Textbook of Biological Psychiatry. Wiley-Liss
  41.  22
    D. Wilson (2014). Quantifying the Quiet Epidemic: Diagnosing Dementia in Late 20th-Century Britain. History of the Human Sciences 27 (5):126-146.
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  42.  19
    Kevin M. Kniffin & David Sloan Wilson (2005). Utilities of Gossip Across Organizational Levels. Human Nature 16 (3):278-292.
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  43.  1
    David Sloan Wilson & Elliott Sober (2002). Unto Others. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (3):692-696.
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  44.  9
    Steve Joordens, Daryl E. Wilson, Thomas M. Spalek & Dwayne E. Paré (2010). Turning the Process-Dissociation Procedure Inside-Out: A New Technique for Understanding the Relation Between Conscious and Unconscious Influences. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):270-280.
    While there is now general agreement that memory gives rise to both conscious and unconscious influences, there remains disagreement concerning the process architecture underlying these distinct influences. Do they arise from independent underlying systems or from systems that are interactive ? In the current paper we present a novel “inside-out” technique that can be used with the process-dissociation paradigm to arrive at more concrete conclusions concerning this central question and demonstrate this technique via a meta-analysis of currently published findings. Our (...)
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  45.  11
    Donald E. Wilson (1984). Commentary. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 3 (2):65-67.
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  46.  16
    Daniel J. Wilson (1990). Science, Community, and the Transformation of American Philosophy, 1860-1930. University of Chicago Press.
    In the first book-length study of American philosophy at the turn of the century, Daniel J. Wilson traces the formation of philosophy as an academic discipline. Wilson shows how the rise of the natural and physical sciences at the end of the nineteenth century precipitated a "crisis of confidence" among philosophers as to the role of their discipline. Deftly tracing the ways in which philosophers sought to incorporate scientific values and methods into their outlook and to redefine philosophy itself, Wilson (...)
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  47. Donald Wilson (2015). Norms of Truthfulness and Non-Deception in Kantian Ethics. In Pablo Muchnik Oliver Thorndike (ed.), Rethinking Kant Volume 4. Cambridge Scholars Publishing 111-134.
    Questions about the morality of lying tend to be decided in a distinctive way early in discussions of Kant’s view on the basis of readings of the false promising example in his Groundwork of The metaphysics of morals. The standard deception-as-interference model that emerges typically yields a very general and strong presumption against deception associated with a narrow and rigorous model subject to a range of problems. In this paper, I suggest an alternative account based on Kant’s discussion of self-deception (...)
     
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  48.  63
    Donald Wilson (2009). Moral Deliberation and Desire Development: Herman on Alienation. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 39 (2):pp. 283-308.
    In Chapter 9 of The Practice of Moral Judgment and her later article Making Room for Character, Barbara Herman offers a distinctive response to a familiar set of concerns with the room left for character and personal relationships in Kantian ethics. She begins by acknowledging the shortcomings of her previous response on this issue and by distancing herself from a standard kind of indirect argument for the importance of personal commitments according to which these have moral weight in virtue of (...)
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  49.  12
    Donald Wilson (2004). Moral Health, Moral Prosperity and Universalization in Kant's Ethics. Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 23 (1):17.
    Drawing on an analysis of the distinction between perfect and imperfect duties suggested by The Metaphysics of Morals, I argue that Kant’s Categorical Imperative (CI) requires that maxims be universalizable in the sense that they can be regarded as universal laws consistent with the integrity and effective exercise of rational agency. This account, I claim, has a number of advantages over Korsgaard’s practical contradic-tion interpretation of the CI both in terms of the criteria of assessment that Korsgaard uses and in (...)
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  50.  19
    Dan Sperber & Deirdre Wilson (2013). 10. Precis of Relevance: Communication and Cognition. In Maite Ezcurdia & Robert J. Stainton (eds.), The Semantics-Pragmatics Boundary in Philosophy. Broadview Press 220.
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