Search results for 'Wing-Shing Chan' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Hsi Chu, Tsu-ch'ien Lü & Wing-Tsit Chan (1967). Reflections on Things at Hand the Neo-Confucian Anthology, Compiled by Chu Hsi and Lü Tsu-Ch'ien. Translated, with Notes by Wing-Tsit Chan. --. Columbia University Press.
     
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  2.  14
    Wing-Shing Chan (2008). Psychological Attachment, No-Self and Chan Buddhist Mind Therapy. Contemporary Buddhism 9 (2):253-264.
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  3.  4
    Wing‐Cheuk Chan (2013). The Thought of Mou Zongsan. By N. Serina Chan. (Leiden: Brill, 2011. 342 Pp. Hardback, ISBN 978‐900‐04‐21211‐4.). Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (1):208-211.
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  4.  11
    Wing-tsit Chan (1973). Chan Jo-Shui's Influence on Wang Yang-Ming. Philosophy East and West 23 (1/2):9-30.
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  5.  33
    Wing-tsit Chan (1963). A Source Book in Chinese Philosophy. Princeton, N.J.,Princeton University Press.
    This Source Book is devoted to the purpose of providing such a basis for genuine understanding of Chinese thought (and thereby of Chinese life and culture, ...
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  6.  37
    Wing-Tsit Chan (1955). The Evolution of the Confucian Concept Jên. Philosophy East and West 4 (4):295-319.
  7. Wing-Tsit Chan (1957). Neo-Confucianism and Chinese Scientific Thought. Philosophy East and West 6 (4):309-332.
  8. Wing-Tsit Chan (1967). Neo-Confucianism: New Ideas in Old Terminology. Philosophy East and West 17 (1/4):15-35.
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  9. Yulan Fung, Wing-Tsit Chan, H. G. Creel & Arthur F. Wright (1956). A History of Chinese Philosophy. Ethics 66 (4):299-301.
     
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  10.  17
    Wing-Tsit Chan (1975). Chinese and Western Interpretations of Jen (Humanity). Journal of Chinese Philosophy 2 (2):107-129.
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  11.  1
    Wing‐Cheuk Chan (2014). Liu Zongzhou and Michel Henry on Absolute Subjectivity. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 41 (3-4):328-343.
    With the thesis that life is auto-affection, the French philosopher Michel Henry introduced a phenomenology of life. By disclosing the parallels between the Ming Neo-Confucian Liu Zongzhou's and Henry's philosophy, this article tries to develop a more radical understanding of the essential difference between Liu Zongzhou's and Wang Yangming's Confucianism. Moreover, it will show in what sense Liu Zongzhou's doctrine is a phenomenology of life. In contrast to Henry's founding of the phenomenology of life upon Christianity, Liu Zongzhou's approach is (...)
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  12.  18
    Wing S. Chow, Jane P. Wu & Allan K. K. Chan (2009). The Effects of Environmental Factors on the Behavior of Chinese Managers in the Information Age in China. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):629 - 639.
    This paper examines the effects of environmental factors on the ethical behavior of managers using computers at work in Mainland China. In this study, environmental factors refer to senior management, peer groups, company policies, professional practices, and legal considerations. Ethical behaviors include attitudes to disclosure, protection of privacy, conflict of interest, personal conduct, social responsibility, and integrity. A questionnaire survey was used for data collection, and 125 mainland Chinese managers participated in the study. The results show that peer groups, professional (...)
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  13.  1
    Benedict Shing Bun Chan, Zion Tsz Ho Tse, King-Wa Fu, Chi-Ngai Cheung & Isaac Chun-Hai Fung (2015). Why We Should Care About Ebola in West Africa and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome in South Korea: Global Health Ethics and the Moral Insignificance of Proximity. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (4):541-543.
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  14.  38
    Wing-Cheuk Chan (2011). Mou Zongsan and Tang Junyi on Zhang Zai's and Wang Fuzhi's Philosophies of Qi : A Critical Reflection. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (1):85-98.
    Fuzhi’s philosophies of qi. In this essay, both the strength and weakness of their interpretations will be critically examined. As a contrast, an alternative interpretation of the School of qi in Song-Ming Neo-Confucianism will be outlined. This new interpretation will uncover that, like Leibniz, Zhang Zai and Wang Fuzhi introduced a non-substantivalist approach in natural philosophy in terms of an innovative concept of force. This interpretation not only helps to show the limitations of Mou Zongsan’s and Tang Junyi’s understandings of (...)
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  15.  4
    Ariane Rump & Wing-Tsit Chan (1981). Commentary on the Lao Tzu by Wang Pi. Philosophy East and West 31 (1):97-98.
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  16.  11
    Wing-Cheuk Chan (2008). Daoism and the Later Merleau-Ponty on Body. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 51:3-9.
    Laozi says, “The reason why I have great trouble is that I have a body.” Zhuangzi also asks us to forget the body. These seem to suggest that Daoism holds a negative view on the body. However, I will argue for a positive understanding of the Daoist doctrine of the body. In The Visible and the Invisible, the later Merleau‐Ponty aims to introduce an ontology of the flesh. With the help of his concept of the flesh of the world, one (...)
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  17. Wing-Tsit Chan (1988). Chu Hsi and Neo-Confucianism. Philosophy East and West 38 (1):77-79.
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  18.  38
    Wing-cheuk Chan (2010). Yang, Zebo 楊澤波, an Examination of Mou Zongsan's Three-Fold Typology 牟宗三三系論論衡. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (1):133-136.
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  19.  4
    Yu-Wing Chan (2012). Pre-Service English Teachers' Perceptions of Newly. Sophia 3:3.
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  20. Wing-Tsit Chan (1994). Chu Hsi: New Studies. Philosophy East and West 44 (1):186-189.
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  21.  8
    Wing-Tsit Chan (1962). How Buddhistic is Wang Yang-Ming? Philosophy East and West 12 (3):203-215.
  22.  32
    Wing-cheuk Chan (2006). Mou Zongsan's Transformation of Kant's Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (1):125–139.
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  23.  7
    Wing-tsit Chan & Swami Nikhilananda (1951). News and Notes. Philosophy East and West 1 (1).
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  24.  9
    Wing-tsit Chan (1975). Chu Hsi's Appraisal of Lao Tzu. Philosophy East and West 25 (2):131-144.
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  25.  15
    Wing-Cheuk Chan (2011). Mou Zongsan on Confucian and Kant's Ethics: A Critical Reflection. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (s1):146-164.
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  26.  6
    Wing-Tsit Chan (1955). Studies in Chinese Thought. Review of Metaphysics 8 (4):658-668.
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  27.  25
    Wing-Tsit Chan (1958). Transformation of Buddhism in China. Philosophy East and West 7 (3/4):107-116.
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  28.  16
    Wing-Tsit Chan (1956). Hu Shih and Chinese Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 6 (1):3-12.
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  29.  13
    Wing-tsit Chan (1972). Wang Yang-Ming: Western Studies and an Annotated Bibliography. Philosophy East and West 22 (1):75-92.
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  30.  18
    Wing-cheuk Chan (2010). Two Dogmas of Critical Buddhism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (2):276-294.
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  31.  2
    Chen Rongjie & Wing-Tsit Chan (1993). An Exploration of the Concept of Zhong in the Teachings of Confucianism. Contemporary Chinese Thought 24 (3):72-100.
    In the fifth year of the reign of Shaoxi [in the Song dynasty]—in other words, in the year 1194 A.D.—Zhu Xi was returning to his home province after he had been relieved of his position at court as daizhi shijiang when, in the eleventh month of that year he came to Yushan county in Jiangxi Province. The governor of the district invited Master Zhu to give a number of lectures at the local county school, and Master Zhu complied, discoursing on (...)
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  32.  20
    S. Chow Wing, P. Wu Jane & K. K. Chan Allan (2009). The Effects of Environmental Factors on the Behavior of Chinese Managers in the Information Age in China. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4).
    This paper examines the effects of environmental factors on the ethical behavior of managers using computers at work in Mainland China. In this study, environmental factors refer to senior management, peer groups, company policies, professional practices, and legal considerations. Ethical behaviors include attitudes to disclosure, protection of privacy, conflict of interest, personal conduct, social responsibility, and integrity. A questionnaire survey was used for data collection, and 125 mainland Chinese managers participated in the study. The results show that peer groups, professional (...)
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  33.  18
    Wing-Tsit Chan (1953). A Bibliography of Chinese Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 3 (3):241-256.
  34.  19
    Wing-Cheuk Chan (2003). Phenomenology of Technology: East and West. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 30 (1):1–18.
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  35.  19
    Wing-Tsit Chan (1961). Chinese Philosophy in Communist China. Philosophy East and West 11 (3):115-123.
  36.  13
    Wing-Tsit Chan (1977). Julia Ching, To Acquire Wisdom: The Way of Wang Yang-Ming. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 4 (4):409-416.
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  37.  17
    Wing-tsit Chan (1988). Exploring the Confucian Tradition. Philosophy East and West 38 (3):234-250.
  38.  17
    Wing-Tsit Chan (1954). Basic Problems in the Study of Chinese Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 4 (2):157-166.
  39. Wang Yang-Ming & Wing-Tsit Chan (1965). Instructions for Practical Living and Other Neo-Confucian Writings. Philosophy East and West 15 (3):293-296.
     
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  40.  1
    Wing-Tsit Chan (1989). Chu Hsi: Life and Thought. Philosophy East and West 39 (2):211-212.
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  41.  11
    Wing-Cheuk Chan (2011). On Mou Zongsan's Hermeneutic Application of Buddhism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):174-189.
  42. Wing-Tsit Chan & Ch'êng-Chih Ch'ên (1969). Neo-Confucianism, Etc. Essays. Hong Kong Office, Oriental Society.
     
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  43.  10
    Wing-Cheuk Chan & Henry C. H. Shiu (2011). Introduction: Mou Zongsan and Chinese Buddhism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):169-173.
  44. Hsi Chu, Wing-Tsit Chan & Tsu-ch'ien Lü (1967). Reflections on Things at Hand the Neo-Confucian Anthology. Columbia University Press.
     
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  45.  14
    Wing-tsit Chan (1972). Wang Yang-Ming: A Biography. Philosophy East and West 22 (1):63-74.
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  46.  3
    Wing-Cheuk Chan (2004). How is Absolute Wisdom Possible? Wang Yangming and Buddhism. Wisdom in China and the West 22:329.
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  47.  12
    Wing-Tsit Chan (1964). Chinese Philosophy in Mainland China, 1949-1963. Philosophy East and West 14 (1):25-38.
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  48.  10
    Wing-cheuk Chan (2005). On Heidegger's Interpretation of Aristotle: A Chinese Perspective. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (4):539–557.
  49.  7
    Wing-Tsit Chan (1978). Patterns forneo-confucianism: Why Chu Hsia differed from Ch'eng I. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 5 (2):101-126.
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  50.  8
    Wing-tsit Chan (1972). Correspondence. Philosophy East and West 22 (4):90 -.
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