Search results for 'Witchcraft' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Niek Koning (2013). Witchcraft Beliefs and Witch Hunts. Human Nature 24 (2):158-181.score: 24.0
    This paper proposes an interdisciplinary explanation of the cross-cultural similarities and evolutionary patterns of witchcraft beliefs. It argues that human social dilemmas have led to the evolution of a fear system that is sensitive to signs of deceit and envy. This was adapted in the evolutionary environment of small foraging bands but became overstimulated by the consequences of the Agricultural Revolution, leading to witch paranoia. State formation, civilization, and economic development abated the fear of witches and replaced it in (...)
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  2. B. Hallen (1986/1997). Knowledge, Belief, and Witchcraft: Analytic Experiments in African Philosophy. Stanford University Press.score: 24.0
    First published in 1986, Knowledge, Belief, and Witchcraft remains the only analysis of indigenous discourse about an African belief system undertaken from within the framework of Anglo-American analytical philosophy. Taking as its point of departure W. V. O. Quine's thesis about the indeterminacy of translation, the book investigates questions of Yoruba epistemology and of how knowledge is conceived in an oral culture.
     
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  3. Willem de Blécourt (2013). 4. “Keep That Woman Out!” Notions of Space in Twentieth‐Century Flemish Witchcraft Discourse. History and Theory 52 (3):361-379.score: 21.0
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  4. Sophie B. Oluwole (1992). Witchcraft, Reincarnation and the God-Head: (Issues in African Philosophy). Excel Publishers.score: 21.0
  5. Struan Jacobs (2003). Two Sources of Michael Polanyi's Prototypal Notion of Incommensurability: Evans-Pritchard on Azande Witchcraft and St Augustine on Conversion. History of the Human Sciences 16 (2):57-76.score: 18.0
    Michael Polanyi argues in Personal Knowledge (1958) that conceptual frameworks involved in major scientific controversies are separated by a `logical gap'. Such frameworks, according to Polanyi (1958: 151), are logically disconnected: their protagonists think differently, use different languages and occupy different worlds. Relinquishing one framework and adopting another, Polanyi's scientist undergoes a `conversion' to a new `faith'. Polanyi, in other words, presaged Kuhn and Feyerabend's concept of incommensurability. To what influences was Polanyi subject as he developed his concept of the (...)
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  6. Albert Mosley (2001). Witchcraft, Science and the Skeptical Inquirer: Conversations with the Late Prof. Peter Bodunrin. Philosophical Papers 30 (3):289-306.score: 18.0
    Abstract This paper reviews the connection claimed to exist between magic, witchcraft, and parapsychology. Special attention is given to issues raised by the late Prof. Peter Bodunrin of Nigeria, including the demand that knowledge gained by psychic means be grounded in beliefs justified by good reasons and convincing experimental evidence. In contrast, I argue for a more inclusive view of both knowledge and the scientific enterprise that recognizes the importance of non-experimental evidence and the influence of social trends on (...)
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  7. M. Elijah Baloyi (2014). A Pastoral Examination of the Christian Church's Response to Fears of and Reactions to Witchcraft Amongst African People in the Limpopo Province of South Africa. Hts Theological Studies 70 (2):01-09.score: 18.0
    ABSTRACT Amongst other things, African culture (societies) has been characterised by its perception and fear of witchcraft. Even though the belief in witchcraft is an old phenomenon, its growth is revealed and to some extent mitigated by videos, films and accounts and stories of church ministers. Whilst some Christian worship services have been turned into witchcraft-centred campaigns against witchcraft, a second group perceive witchcraft as a way of getting rid of one's enemies and a third (...)
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  8. Malcolm Gaskill (2010). Witchcraft: A Very Short Introduction. OUP Oxford.score: 18.0
    Witchcraft is a subject that fascinates us all, and everyone knows what a witch is - or do they? From childhood most of us develop a sense of the mysterious, malign person, usually an old woman. Historically, too, we recognize witch-hunting as a feature of pre-modern societies. But why do witches still feature so heavily in our cultures and consciousness? From Halloween to superstitions, and literary references such as Faust and even Harry Potter, witches still feature heavily in our (...)
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  9. T. S. Petrus & D. L. Bogopa (2007). Natural and Supernatural: Intersections Between the Spiritual and Natural Worlds in African Witchcraft and Healing with Reference to Southern Africa. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 7 (1).score: 18.0
    For generations, African beliefs and practices regarding witchcraft and traditional healing have been located at the intersection between the natural world and the supernatural world. Despite the impact of both colonialism and, in the contemporary context, modernization, the complex interplay between these worlds has not been reduced. The interaction between nature and religion, as a facet of culture, has long been a subject of inquiry in anthropology, and nowhere is this more evident than in the study of African (...) and traditional healing. A distinct relationship exists between witchcraft beliefs and traditional healing methods. This relationship brings these two aspects of African culture together in such a complex manner that it is difficult to attempt to understand the dynamics of African witchcraft without referring to traditional healing methods, and vice versa. In this paper, the authors outline the various ways in which African witchcraft beliefs and practices, as well as traditional healing beliefs and practices, interact within the nature/culture domain. This interaction will be conceptualised in a Merleau-Pontian sense, focusing on the indeterminacy of the natural and supernatural worlds. In its presentation of an essentially anthropological case study focused on southern Africa, the paper draws on various ethnographic examples of African communities in the southern African context. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology , Volume 7, Edition 1 May 2007. (shrink)
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  10. Julie A. Davies (2012). Poisonous Vapours: Joseph Glanvill's Science of Witchcraft. Intellectual History Review 22 (2):163-179.score: 18.0
    (2012). Poisonous Vapours: Joseph Glanvill's Science of Witchcraft. Intellectual History Review: Vol. 22, No. 2, pp. 163-179. doi: 10.1080/17496977.2012.693741.
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  11. G. Tarabout (2000). ``Passions'' in the Discourses on Witchcraft in Kerala. Journal of Indian Philosophy 28 (5/6):651-664.score: 18.0
    This paper is about misfortune as elaborated in the narratives of (counter-) witchcraft practitioners and consultants. Their statements can be read from different perspectives, and I choose here to look at them specifically in terms of 'passions' and their control.
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  12. Howard Sankey (2010). Witchcraft, Relativism and the Problem of the Criterion. Erkenntnis 72 (1):1 - 16.score: 15.0
    This paper presents a naturalistic response to the challenge of epistemic relativism. The case of the Azande poison oracle is employed as an example of an alternative epistemic norm which may be used to justify beliefs about everyday occurrences. While a distinction is made between scepticism and relativism, an argument in support of epistemic relativism is presented that is based on the sceptical problem of the criterion. A response to the resulting relativistic position is then provided on the basis of (...)
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  13. Howard Sankey, Azande Witchcraft, Epistemological Relativism and the Problem of the Criterion.score: 15.0
    In this paper, I discuss the problem of epistemological relativism, which I take to be the problem of providing epistemic norms with an objective rational justification, rather than the problem of arguing for universality. I illustrate the idea of an alternative epistemic norm by means of Evans-Pritchard's discussion of the Azande poison-oracle. Though I take there to be a sharp distinction between relativism and scepticism, nevertheless I present an argument for relativism at the level of epistemic norms which employs the (...)
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  14. John W. Cook (1983). Magic, Witchcraft, and Science. Philosophical Investigations 6 (1):2-36.score: 15.0
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  15. Martin Hollis (1972). Witchcraft and Winchcraft. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 2 (1):89-103.score: 15.0
  16. Polycarp Ikuenobe (1995). Cognitive Relativism, African Philosophy, and the Phenomenon of Witchcraft. Journal of Social Philosophy 26 (3):143-160.score: 15.0
  17. Jacqueline Broad, Margaret Cavendish and Joseph Glanvill : Science, Religion, and Witchcraft.score: 15.0
  18. Alastair Hamilton (2007). Malleus Maleficarum. By Henricus Institoris, O. P. And Jacobus Sprenger, O. P. Edited and Translated by Christopher S. MacKay, Heresy, Magic, and Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe. By Gary K. Waite and Demonic Possession and Exorcism in Early Modern France. By Sarah Ferber. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 48 (3):477–479.score: 15.0
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  19. W. W. Sharrock & R. J. Anderson (1985). Magic Witchcraft and the Materialist Mentality. Human Studies 8 (4):357 - 375.score: 15.0
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  20. Ross J. Pudaloff (1991). Witchcraft at Salem: (Mis)Representing the Subject. Semiotica 83 (3-4):333-350.score: 15.0
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  21. Hugo Meynell (1972). Truth, Witchcraft and Professor Winch. Heythrop Journal 13 (2):162–172.score: 15.0
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  22. Robert Denoon Cumming (1979). This Place of Violence, Obscurity and Witchcraft. Political Theory 7 (2):181-200.score: 15.0
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  23. S. F. Davies (2013). The Reception of Reginald Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft: Witchcraft, Magic, and Radical Religion. Journal of the History of Ideas 74 (3):381-401.score: 15.0
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  24. Rossell Hope Robbins (1977). Occultism, Witchcraft, and Cultural Fashions. Thought 52 (2):205-206.score: 15.0
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  25. Karsten B. Steuber (2003). Woodcutters and Witchcraft. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 67 (1):230-233.score: 15.0
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  26. Charles Griffith (1877). VIII. Some Observations on Witchcraft in Basutoland. Transactions of the South African Philosophical Society 1 (2):87-92.score: 15.0
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  27. Risto Hiltunen (1996). ?Tell Me, Be You a Witch??: Questions in the Salem Witchcraft Trials of 1692. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 9 (1):17-37.score: 15.0
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  28. Jenny Jochens (2012). Mitchell, Witchcraft and Magic in the Nordic Middle Ages. (Middle Ages Series.) Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011. Pp. Xiii, 368; 12 B&W Figs. $49.95. ISBN: 9780812242904. [REVIEW] Speculum 87 (4):1232-1234.score: 15.0
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  29. Lynn LiDonnici (2004). A SOURCEBOOK ON MAGIC D. Ogden: Magic, Witchcraft, and Ghosts in the Greek and Roman Worlds. A Sourcebook . Pp. X + 353, Ills. New York: Oxford University Press, 2002. Cased, £55. ISBN: 0-19-513575-X (0-19-515123-2 Pbk). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 54 (02):441-.score: 15.0
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  30. V. Y. Mudimbe (1987). Barry Hallen and J. 0. Sodipo, Knowledge, Belief and Witchcraft: Analytic Experiments an African Philosophy Reviewed By. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 7 (5):200-202.score: 15.0
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  31. Professof Franz Staab (1989). Witches and Belief in Witchcraft. Philosophy and History 22 (2):184-185.score: 15.0
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  32. Anastasia Apostolides & Yolanda Dreyer (2008). The Greek Evil Eye, African Witchcraft, and Western Ethnocentrism. Hts Theological Studies 64 (2):1021-1042.score: 15.0
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  33. Adam Ashforth (forthcoming). Of Secrecy and the Commonplace: Witchcraft and Power in Soweto. Social Research.score: 15.0
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  34. Michael D. Bailey (2001). From Sorcery to Witchcraft: Clerical Conceptions of Magic in the Later Middle Ages. Speculum 76 (4):960-990.score: 15.0
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  35. Michael D. Bailey (2005). Walter Stephens, Demon Lovers: Witchcraft, Sex, and the Crisis of Belief. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 2002. Pp. Xv, 451; 16 Black-and-White Figures and 2 Diagrams. $35. [REVIEW] Speculum 80 (1):334-335.score: 15.0
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  36. Richard Barnett (2009). From Witchcraft to Wisdom: A History of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in the British Isles. Annals of Science 66 (4):561-563.score: 15.0
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  37. Michael J. Coughlan (1985). Zande Witchcraft. Sophia 24 (3):4-15.score: 15.0
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  38. F. Pellizzi (1969). Witches and Ghosts: Some Considerations On Navaho Witchcraft by Clyde Kluckhohn. Diogenes 17 (65):74-98.score: 15.0
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  39. Charles Edward Hopkin (1982). The Share of Thomas Aquinas in the Growth of the Witchcraft Delusion. Ams Press.score: 15.0
    Introduction.--pt. I. The demonology of Thomas Aquinas.--pt. II. Thomas Aquinas as mediator between earlier and later beliefs.--Conclusion.--Bibliography (p. 185-188).
     
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  40. Otto Huth (1977). Possibilities of Criticism of Witchcraft and Magic in the Late Middle Ages. Contemporary Authors and Their Social Background. Philosophy and History 10 (2):255-255.score: 15.0
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  41. D. L. Macdonald (1996). Iconoclasm and Witchcraft in The Tragedy of Ovid. Lumen: Selected Proceedings From the Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies 15:85.score: 15.0
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  42. James Maffie (1998). Barry Hallen and J. Olubi Sodipo, Knowledge, Belief, and Witchcraft: Analytic Experiments in African Philosophy Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 18 (4):261-262.score: 15.0
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  43. Mark Risjord (1994). Book Review:Bloodsucking Witchcraft: An Epistemological Study of Anthropomorphic Supernaturalism in Rural Tlaxcala Hugo G. Nutini, John M. Roberts. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 61 (4):679-.score: 15.0
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  44. Sasha Newell (2009). Bewitching Development: Witchcraft and the Reinvention of Development in Neoliberal Kenya. James Howard Smith. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press. 2008. Vii+269pp. [REVIEW] Ethos 37 (4):1-3.score: 15.0
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  45. Professof Dr Franz Staab (1989). Witches and Belief in Witchcraft. Philosophy and History 22 (2):184-185.score: 15.0
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  46. Walter Stephens (1999). Gerhild Scholz Williams, Defining Dominion: The Discourses of Magic and Witchcraft in Early Modern France and Germany.(Studies in Medieval and Early Modern Civilization.) Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan Press, 1995. Pp. Xi, 234. [REVIEW] Speculum 74 (4):1119-1121.score: 15.0
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  47. E. T. (1956). The History of Witchcraft and Demonology. Review of Metaphysics 10 (2):371-371.score: 15.0
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  48. Helmut Wautischer (1990). Magic, Witchcraft, and Paganism in America: A Bibliography. Anthropology of Consciousness 1 (3‐4):34-35.score: 15.0
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  49. Colwyn Williamson (1989). Witchcraft and Winchcraft. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 19 (4):445-460.score: 15.0
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  50. Andrea Rohfls Wright (1996). Witchcraft and Science in the Renaissance: The Witch of Edmonton, the Late Lancashire Witches and Renaissance Attitudes Toward Science. Endoxa 7:217-230.score: 15.0
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