Search results for 'Witnesses' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  2
    Jehovah'S. Witnesses (1997). M. Gene Smalley. Bioethics Yearbook: Volume 5-Theological Developments in Bioethics: 1992-1994 5:259.
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  2.  1
    Corneliu Pintilescu & Andrada Fatu-Tutoveanu (2011). Jehova's Witnesses in Post-Communist Romania: The Relationship Between the Religious Minority and the State (1989-2010). Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 10 (30):102-126.
    This study aims at chronicling current aspects and transformations in the relationship between the Jehovah's Witnesses religious minority and the Romanian state (1989-2010), focusing on this religious group's changing official status. Considering both previous contributions and debates on the relations between state and religion, and the distinction between the concepts of denomination versus sect, the present work analyzes the key issues of the long-lasting conflict between the state and this particular religious minority, as well as the factors influencing these (...)
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  3. Timothy McGrew & Lydia McGrew (2012). The Reliability of Witnesses and Testimony to the Miraculous. In Jake Chandler Victoria S. Harrison (ed.), Probability in the Philosophy of Religion. Oxford
    The formal representation of the strength of witness testimony has been historically tied to a formula — proposed by Condorcet — that uses a factor representing the reliability of an individual witness. This approach encourages a false dilemma between hyper-scepticism about testimony, especially to extraordinary events such as miracles, and an overly sanguine estimate of reliability based on insufficiently detailed evidence. Because Condorcet’s formula does not have the resources for representing numerous epistemically relevant details in the unique situation in which (...)
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  4.  61
    Arif Ahmed (2015). Hume and the Independent Witnesses. Mind 124 (496):1013-1044.
    The Humean argument concerning miracles says that one should always think it more likely that anyone who testifies to a miracle is lying or deluded than that the alleged miracle actually occurred, and so should always reject any single report of it. A longstanding and widely accepted objection is that even if this is right, the concurring and non-collusive testimony of many witnesses should make it rational to believe in whatever miracle they all report. I argue that on the (...)
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  5.  67
    James van Cleve (2011). Can Coherence Generate Warrant Ex Nihilo? Probability and the Logic of Concurring Witnesses. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (2):337-380.
    Most foundationalists allow that relations of coherence among antecedently justified beliefs can enhance their overall level of justification or warrant. In light of this, some coherentists ask the following question: if coherence can elevate the epistemic status of a set of beliefs, what prevents it from generating warrant entirely on its own? Why do we need the foundationalist’s basic beliefs? I address that question here, drawing lessons from an instructive series of attempts to reconstruct within the probability calculus the classical (...)
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  6.  41
    O. Muramoto (1998). Bioethics of the Refusal of Blood by Jehovah's Witnesses: Part 1. Should Bioethical Deliberation Consider Dissidents' Views? Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (4):223-230.
    Jehovah's Witnesses' (JWs) refusal of blood transfusions has recently gained support in the medical community because of the growing popularity of "no-blood" treatment. Many physicians, particularly so-called "sympathetic doctors", are establishing a close relationship with this religious organization. On the other hand, it is little known that this blood doctrine is being strongly criticized by reform-minded current and former JWs who have expressed conscientious dissent from the organization. Their arguments reveal religious practices that conflict with many physicians' moral standards. (...)
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  7.  89
    D. T. Ridley (1999). Jehovah's Witnesses' Refusal of Blood: Obedience to Scripture and Religious Conscience. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (6):469-472.
    Jehovah's Witnesses are students of the Bible. They refuse transfusions out of obedience to the scriptural directive to abstain and keep from blood. Dr Muramoto disagrees with the Witnesses' religious beliefs in this regard. Despite this basic disagreement over the meaning of Biblical texts, Muramoto flouts the religious basis for the Witnesses' position. His proposed policy change about accepting transfusions in private not only conflicts with the Witnesses' fundamental beliefs but it promotes hypocrisy. In addition, Muramoto's (...)
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  8.  32
    G. L. Bock (2012). Jehovah's Witnesses and Autonomy: Honouring the Refusal of Blood Transfusions. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (11):652-656.
    This paper explores the scriptural and theological reasons given by Jehovah's Witnesses (JWs) to refuse blood transfusions. Julian Savulescu and Richard W Momeyer argue that informed consent should be based on rational beliefs and that the refusal of blood transfusions by JWs is irrational, but after examining the reasons given by JWs, I challenge the claim that JW beliefs are irrational. I also question whether we should give up the traditional notion of informed consent.
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  9.  36
    O. Muramoto (1999). Bioethics of the Refusal of Blood by Jehovah's Witnesses: Part 3. A Proposal for a Don't-Ask-Don't-Tell Policy. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (6):463-468.
    Of growing concern over Jehovah's Witnesses' (JWs) refusal of blood is the intrusion of the religious organisation into its members' personal decision making about medical care. The organisation currently may apply severe religious sanctions to JWs who opt for certain forms of blood-based treatment. While the doctrine may be maintained as the unchangeable "law of God", the autonomy of individual JW patients could still be protected by the organisation modifying its current policy so that it strictly adheres to the (...)
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  10.  36
    Itamar Pitowsky, Random Witnesses and the Classical Character of Macroscopic Objects.
    Why don't we see large macroscopic objects in entangled states? Even if the particles composing the object were all entangled and insulated from the environment, we shall still find it almost always impossible to observe the superposition. The reason is that as the number of particles n grows, we need an ever more careful preparation, and an ever more carefully designed experiment, in order to recognize the entangled character of the state of the object. An observable W that distinguishes all (...)
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  11.  10
    O. Muramoto (1998). Bioethics of the Refusal of Blood by Jehovah's Witnesses: Part 2. A Novel Approach Based on Rational Non-Interventional Paternalism. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (5):295-301.
    Most physicians dealing with Jehovah's Witnesses (JWs) who refuse blood-based treatment are uncertain as to any obligation to educate patients where it concerns the JW blood doctrine itself. They often feel they must unquestioningly comply when demands are framed as religiously based. Recent discussion by dissidents and reformers of morally questionable policies by the JW organisation raise ethical dilemmas about "passive" support of this doctrine by some concerned physicians. In this paper, Part 2, I propose that physicians discuss the (...)
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  12.  9
    Silvia De Renzi (2002). Witnesses of the Body: Medico-Legal Cases in Seventeenth-Century Rome. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (2):219-242.
    Studying early modern medico-legal testimonies can enrich our understanding of witnessing, the focus of much research in the history of science. Expert testimonies were well established in the Roman Canon law, but the sphere of competence of expert witnesses—one of the grounds on which seventeenth-century physicians claimed social and intellectual authority—troubled contemporary jurists. By reconstructing these debates in Counter Reformation Rome, and by placing in them the testimonies given by Paolo Zacchia, one of the founding fathers of legal medicine, (...)
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  13.  8
    James van Cleve (2011). Can Coherence Generate Warrant "Ex Nihilo"? Probability and the Logic of Concurring Witnesses. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (2):337 - 380.
    Most foundationalists allow that relations of coherence among antecedently justified beliefs can enhance their overall level of justification or warrant. In light of this, some coherentists ask the following question: if coherence can elevate the epistemic status of a set of beliefs, what prevents it from generating warrant entirely on its own? Why do we need the foundationalist's basic beliefs? I address that question here, drawing lessons from an instructive series of attempts to reconstruct within the probability calculus the classical (...)
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  14.  25
    Jeffrey E. Pfeifer & John C. Brigham (1993). Ethical Concerns of Nonclinical Forensic Witnesses and Consultants. Ethics and Behavior 3 (3 & 4):329 – 343.
    Current research suggests that nonclinical forensic psychologists[sup1] are appearing increasingly more often in the legal arena. We argue that many of the ethical dilemmas that face these psychologists differ from those encountered by clinical forensic psychologists. To test the accuracy of this assertion, 37 nonclinical forensic psychologists were surveyed to identify some of the ethical issues and dilemmas they have encountered while engaging in expert testimony or pretrial consulting. Respondents were asked also about how they have resolved these ethical issues (...)
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  15.  9
    R. Gillon (2000). Refusal of Potentially Life-Saving Blood Transfusions by Jehovah's Witnesses: Should Doctors Explain That Not All JWs Think It's Religiously Required? Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (5):299-301.
    In this issue of the journal “Lee Elder”,1 a pseudonymous dissident Jehovah's Witness , previously an Elder of that faith and still a JW, joins the indefatigable Dr Muramoto2–5 in arguing that even by their own religious beliefs based on biblical scriptures JWs are not required to refuse potentially life-saving blood transfusions. Just as the “official” JW hierarchy has accepted that biblical scriptures do not forbid the transfusion or injection of blood fractions so too JW theology logically can and should (...)
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  16.  1
    O. Muramoto (2000). Medical Confidentiality and the Protection of Jehovah's Witnesses' Autonomous Refusal of Blood. Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (5):381-386.
    Mr Ridley of the Watch Tower Society , the controlling religious organisation of Jehovah's Witnesses , mischaracterises the issue of freedom and confidentiality in JWs' refusal of blood by confusing inconsistent organisational policies with actual Biblical proscriptions. Besides exaggeration and distortion of my writings, Ridley failed to present substantive evidence to support his assertion that no pressure exists to conform to organisational policy nor systematic monitoring which compromises medical confidentiality. In this refutation, I present proof from the WTS's literature, (...)
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  17.  5
    H. M. Descombes (2001). Jehovah's Witnesses and Blood Transfusions. Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (5):355.
    sirI have been following with interest the series of articles in the Journal of Medical Ethics on the subject of Jehovah's Witnesses and the refusal of blood transfusions. There are a couple of aspects which have not been covered and which I would like to raise.Most of the discussion has centred around adult Jehovah's Witnesses. However, where children are involved the issues become more complex and emotive. I feel that there is a need to examine the rights and (...)
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  18.  2
    Vladimir Petrovic (2007). Social Scientists as Expert Witnesses in The Hague Tribunal and Elsewhere. Filozofija I Društvo 18 (3):103-116.
    The article analyses the role of social scientists as expert witnesses in the ICTY, whose contribution is assessed in the light of the long development of this practice. Wider discussion on the courtroom usage of scientific knowledge is evoked in order to emphasize the problems in regulation of expert witnessing. Differing mechanisms set to ensure the scientific reliability and legal relevance of the contribution of experts is analyzed in different legal contexts and in different scholarly disciplines. Regulation of expert (...)
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  19.  7
    P. J. Kearney (1978). Leukaemia in Children of Jehovah's Witnesses: Issues and Priorities in a Conflict of Care. Journal of Medical Ethics 4 (1):32-35.
    Throughout this paper PJ Kearney attempts to balance the risks and benefits of different approaches in paediatric oncology. Decisions have to be considered both in the short and the long term. Where religious beliefs, such as those held by Jehovah's Witnesses in relation to blood transfusions, conflict with normal medical practice the decision is often removed from the doctor, parents or patient to the courts. This sort of solution can be counter-productive, especially as good health care and subsequent recovery (...)
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  20.  2
    Niklas Juth & Niels Lynøe (2014). Are There Morally Relevant Differences Between Hymen Restoration and Bloodless Treatment for Jehovah’s Witnesses? BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):89.
    Hymen reconstruction is a controversial measure performed to help young females under threat of honour-related violence. Official guidelines often reject offering hymen reconstructions. On the other hand, extraordinary measures in order to enable operations of Jehovah’s Witnesses who want a bloodless operation in order to avoid religiously related sanctions are often considered praiseworthy. The aim is thus to examine whether or not there are relevant differences between these two measures.
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  21.  8
    Jorge Hernández-Arriaga, Carlos Aldana-Valenzuela & Kenneth V. Iserson (2001). Jehovah's Witnesses and Medical Practice in Mexico: Religious Freedom, Parens Patriae, and the Right to Life. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (1):47-52.
    The influx of new groups into society, such as recently established religious groups whose practices differ from societal norms, may disturb relatively stable communities. This instability is exacerbated if these practices contravene long-held fundamental societal tenets, such as the protection of children. This situation now exists in Mexico, where the country's traditional Catholic and secular values clash with those of a religion introduced from the United States, Jehovah's Witnesses. The focal point for these clashes, as it has been elsewhere, (...)
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  22.  6
    K. A. Bramstedt (2006). Transfusion Contracts for Jehovah's Witnesses Receiving Organ Transplants: Ethical Necessity or Coercive Pact? Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (4):193-195.
    Jehovah’s Witnesses should be required to sign transfusion contracts in order to be eligible for transplant.Human donor organs continue to be in short supply, and many potential transplant recipients die while waiting for an allograft to become available.1 Because the organ supply is so limited and the offering of organs is based on the generosity of patients and families, proper stewardship of these organs is an ethical obligation for transplant teams, as well as organ recipients. Preventable graft loss must (...)
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  23.  2
    Iddo Porat (2007). On the Jehovah's Witnesses Cases, Balancing Tests, and Three Kinds of Multicultural Claims. Law and Ethics of Human Rights 1 (1):429-450.
    The Jehovah’s Witnesses cases of the late 1930s and early 1940s presented some of the first instances of American Supreme Court’s attempts to grapple with the challenges of a multicultural society. Taken as a whole, these cases represented a favorable position towards minorities’ claims, even to some extent a path breaking one. The Jehovah’s Witnesses cases were a precursor of the Court’s growing involvement in the protection of minorities’ rights, which colored the entire second half of the 20th (...)
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  24.  1
    Pheme Perkins (1992). “I Have Seen the Lord” (John 20:18) Women Witnesses to the Resurrection. Interpretation 46 (1):31-41.
    If one goes to the fountainhead of the Gospel accounts concerning women as witnesses to Christ's resurrection, one has good reason to posit the following: (a) that women were the first to hear the Easter message; (b) that women, in gathering Jesus' disciples together again, played a crucial role in the founding of the earliest Christian community; and (c) that Mary Magdalene deserves a place in the creedal formulas that cite the names of those to whom the risen Christ (...)
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  25.  82
    Merlin Hoops (forthcoming). Book Review: An Introduction to the New Testament: Witnesses to God's New Work. [REVIEW] Interpretation 63 (1):93-94.
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  26.  20
    Gregor Schiemann (2014). We Are Not Witnesses to a New Scientific Revolution. In A. Nordmann & H. Radder (eds.), Science Transformed? Debating Claims of an Epochal Break. Velbrück 31-42.
    Do the changes that have taken place in the structures and methods of the production of scientific knowledge and in our understanding of science over the past fifty years justify speaking of an epochal break in the development of science? Gregor Schiemann addresses this issues through the notion of a scientific revolution and claims that at present we are not witnessing a new scientific revolution. Instead, Schiemann argues that after the so-called Scientific Revolution in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, a (...)
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  27.  42
    Frank J. Matera (forthcoming). Book Review: The Indelible Image: The Theological and Ethical Thought World of the New Testament, Vol. 1: The Individual Witnesses. [REVIEW] Interpretation 65 (1):102-102.
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  28.  70
    D. Malyon (1998). Transfusion-Free Treatment of Jehovah's Witnesses: Respecting the Autonomous Patient's Rights. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (5):302-307.
  29. Cyrus DeWolf (forthcoming). How Religious Values Affect Medical Care Decisions of Jehovah's Witnesses. Bioethics Forum.
     
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  30.  6
    Ann Milliken Pederson (2007). Needed: Modest Witnesses and Scholars. Zygon 42 (2):281-284.
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  31.  20
    Sophia Vasalou (2007). Boethius, Averroes, and Abu Al-Barakat Al-Bagdadı, Witnesses to Themistius's Works on Aristotle's Topics Ahmad Hasnawi Aristotle's Topics, and Especially, as Far as the Subject of This Study is Concerned, Their Central Books (II-VII), Played a Role of Central Importance. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 17:199-202.
  32.  3
    Flávio José Rocha da Silva (2015). ELLSBERG, Robert. All Saints: daily reflections on saints, prophets, and witnesses for our time. Crossroad: New York. 2000. p. 519-521. [REVIEW] Revista de Teologia . Issn 2177-952x 9 (16):199-201.
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  33.  28
    William Dembski, Rebuttal to Reports by Opposing Expert Witnesses.
    2.1 The Myth of Religious Neutrality ………………..………..………………… 2 2.2 ID and Creationism …………………………………………………………… 7 2.3 Methodological Materialism ……………………………….………………… 9 2.4 ID’s Contribution to Science ……………………………..………………… 13 3 Robert Pennock ………………...…..………………………….……..…………….. 17 4 John Haught ………………………………………………….……..…..………….. 23 5 Kevin Padian …………………………………………………..…….…..………….. 27 6 Kenneth Miller …………...……………………………………………..………….. 34..
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  34.  34
    Martin Kavka (2012). Pierre Bouretz, Witnesses for the Future: Philosophy and Messianism. Translated by Michael B. Smith. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 71 (1):93-96.
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  35.  11
    Hans-Jürgen Eitner (1991). Germans in World War II. Contemporary Witnesses Speak. Philosophy and History 24 (1/2):111-111.
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  36.  4
    Angélica R. Ángeles-llerenas, Veronika Wirtz & César Francisco Lara-álvarez (2009). The Role and Responsibilities of Witnesses in the Informed Consent Process. Developing World Bioethics 9 (1):18-25.
  37.  10
    Joelyn Knopf Levy (1999). Jehovah's Witnesses, Pregnancy, and Blood Transfusions: A Paradigm for the Autonomy Rights of All Pregnant Women. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 27 (2):171-189.
  38.  7
    Medi Ann Volpe (2008). The Trial of the Witnesses: The Rise and Decline of Postliberal Theology – By Paul J. DeHart. Modern Theology 24 (3):525-528.
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  39.  3
    Linda G. Jones (2007). Witnesses of God: Exhortatory Preachers in Medieval Al-Andalus and the Maghreb. Al-Qantara: Revista de Estudios Árabes 28 (1):73-100.
    Este artículo analiza los aspectos retóricos y rituales de la exhortación piadosa (wa,z) practicada en al-Andalus y el Magreb, tomando como base documental dos fuentes homiléticas. Los textos se analizan a la luz de noticias hagiográficas y jurídicas con el fin de determinar el papel social de los wu,,az y el impacto de sus sermones. El poder seductor del sermón se halla en función del carisma del predicador, sus dotes de oratoria y su afán en involucrar activamente a su auditorio (...)
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  40.  3
    James M. Lutz (2013). Until the Fires Stopped Burning: 9/11 and New York City in the Words and Experiences of Survivors and Witnesses. The European Legacy 18 (6):788-789.
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  41.  17
    R. Singelenberg (2001). Jehovah's Witnesses-the Blood Transfusion Taboo. Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (2):138-138.
    SIRThere is nothing wrong with Dr Gillon's suggestion to doctors that they ask Jehovah's Witness patients why they refuse a blood transfusions and present alternative viewpoints. ….
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  42.  6
    Jonathan Harris (2012). Review Howard-Johnston, Witnesses to a World Crisis: Historians and Histories of the Middle East in the Seventh Century. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010. Pp. Xvi, 587; Plates and Maps. $199. ISBN: 9780199208593. [REVIEW] Speculum 87 (3):881-882.
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  43.  6
    Ghita Holmström-Hintikka (1995). Expert Witnesses in Legal Argumentation. Argumentation 9 (3):489-502.
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  44.  16
    J. R. Spencer (2002). A Point of Contention: The Scriptural Basis for the Jehovah's Witnesses' Refusal of Blood Transfusions. Christian Bioethics 8 (1):63-90.
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  45.  16
    L. Elder (2000). Why Some Jehovah's Witnesses Accept Blood and Conscientiously Reject Official Watchtower Society Blood Policy. Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (5):375-380.
    In their responses to Dr Osamu Muramoto Watchtower Society spokesmen David Malyon and Donald Ridley ,1–3 deny many of the criticisms levelled against the WTS by Muramoto.4–6 In this paper I argue as a Jehovah's Witness and on behalf of the members of AJWRB that there is no biblical basis for the WTS's partial ban on blood and that this dissenting theological view should be made clear to all JW patients who reject blood on religious grounds. Such patients should be (...)
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  46.  7
    Terrence F. Ackerman (1980). The Limits of Beneficence: Jehovah's Witnesses & Childhood Cancer. Hastings Center Report 10 (4):13-18.
  47.  3
    Franz Staab (1975). Bavaria Sancta. Witnesses of Christian Faith in Bavaria. Philosophy and History 8 (2):295-297.
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  48.  1
    Ruth Macklin (1988). The Inner Workings of an Ethics Committee: Latest Battle Over Jehovah's Witnesses. Hastings Center Report 18 (1):15-20.
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  49.  3
    Derek Pearsall (1993). Mary A. Rouse and Richard H. Rouse, Authentic Witnesses: Approaches to Medieval Texts and Manuscripts.(Publications in Medieval Studies, 17.) Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 1991. Pp. Viii, 518; 10 Black-and-White Plates, 1 Map. $59.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 68 (4):1210-1211.
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  50.  10
    P. Wade (2001). Treatment of Patients Who Are Jehovah's Witnesses. Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (2):137-a-138.
    SIRI read with interest the recent articles by “Lee Elder”1 and O Muramoto,2 along with the accompanying editorial3 about the treatment of ….
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