Search results for 'Wolf Thümmel' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Urs Lindner, Jürg Nowak, Pia Paust-Lassen & Frieder O. Wolf (eds.) (2008). Philosophieren Unter Anderen: Beiträge Zum Palaver der Menschheit: Frieder Otto Wolf Zum 65. Geburtstag. Westfälisches Dampfboot.score: 180.0
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  2. Susan Wolf (1990). Freedom Within Reason. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Philosophers typically see the issue of free will and determinism in terms of a debate between two standard positions. Incompatibilism holds that freedom and responsibility require causal and metaphysical independence from the impersonal forces of nature. According to compatibilism, people are free and responsible as long as their actions are governed by their desires. In Freedom Within Reason, Susan Wolf charts a path between these traditional positions: We are not free and responsible, she argues, for actions that are governed (...)
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  3. A. Wolf (1935/1999). A History of Science, Technology, and Philosophy in the 16th, 17th, and 18th Centuries. Thoemmes Press.score: 60.0
    Wolf's study represents an incredible work of scholarship. A full and detailed account of three centuries of innovation, these two volumes provide a complete portrait of the foundations of modern science and philosophy. Tracing the origins and development of the achievements of the modern age, it is the story of the birth and growth of the modern mind. A thoroughly comprehensive sourcebook, it deals with all the important developments in science and many of the innovations in the social sciences, (...)
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  4. Susan M. Wolf (2008). Confronting Physician Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: My Father's Death. Hastings Center Report 38 (5):pp. 23-26.score: 30.0
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  5. Susan Wolf (1982). Moral Saints. Journal of Philosophy 79 (8):419-439.score: 30.0
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  6. Susan Wolf (1987). Sanity and the Metaphysics of Responsibility. In Ferdinand David Schoeman (ed.), Responsibility, Character, and the Emotions: New Essays in Moral Psychology. Cambridge University Press. 281.score: 30.0
    My strategy is to examine a recent trend in philosophical discussions of responsibility, a trend that tries, but I think ultimately fails, to give an acceptable analysis of the conditions of responsibility. It fails due to what at first appear to be deep and irresolvable metaphysical problems. It is here that I suggest that the condition of sanity comes to the rescue. What at first appears to be an impossible requirement for responsibility---the requirement that the responsible agent have created her- (...)
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  7. Susan Wolf (1997). Happiness and Meaning: Two Aspects of the Good Life. Social Philosophy and Policy 14 (01):207-.score: 30.0
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  8. Susan Wolf (1980). Asymmetrical Freedom. Journal of Philosophy 77 (March):151-66.score: 30.0
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  9. Susan Wolf (1981). The Importance of Free Will. Mind 90 (February):366-78.score: 30.0
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  10. Susan Wolf (1986). Self-Interest and Interest in Selves. Ethics 96 (July):704-20.score: 30.0
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  11. Susan Wolf (2007). Moral Psychology and the Unity of the Virtues. Ratio 20 (2):145–167.score: 30.0
    The ancient Greeks subscribed to the thesis of the Unity of Virtue, according to which the possession of one virtue is closely related to the possession of all the others. Yet empirical observation seems to contradict this thesis at every turn. What could the Greeks have been thinking of? The paper offers an interpretation and a tentative defence of a qualified version of the thesis. It argues that, as the Greeks recognized, virtue essentially involves knowledge ? specifically, evaluative knowledge of (...)
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  12. Susan Wolf (1997). Meaning and Morality. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 97 (3):299–315.score: 30.0
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  13. Susan Wolf (1999). Morality and the View From Here. Journal of Ethics 3 (3):203-223.score: 30.0
    According to one influential conception of morality, being moral is a matter of acting from or in accordance with a moral point of view, a point of view which is arrived at by abstracting from a more natural, pre-ethical, personal point of view, and recognizing that each person''s personal point of view has equal standing. The idea that, were it not for morality, rational persons would act from their respectively personal points of view is, however, simplistic and misleading. Because our (...)
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  14. Susan Wolf (1992). Morality and Partiality. Philosophical Perspectives 6:243-259.score: 30.0
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  15. Michael P. Wolf (2002). Kripke, Putnam and the Introduction of Natural Kind Terms. Acta Analytica 17 (1):151-170.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I will outline some of the important points made by Kripke and Putnam on the meaning of natural kind terms. Their notion of the baptism of natural kinds- the process by which kind terms are initially introduced into the language — is of special concern here. I argue that their accounts leave some ambiguities that suggest a baptism of objects and kinds that is free of additional theoretical commitments. Both authors suggest that we name the stuff and (...)
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  16. A. Wolf (1942). A History of Science and its Relations with Philosophy and Religion. By Sir William Cecil Dampier (Formerly Whetham), Sc.D., F.R.S. Fellow and Sometime Senior Tutor of Trinity College, Cambridge. Fellow of Winchester College. Third Edition. Revised and Enlarged. (Cambridge: At the University Press, 1942. Pp. Xxiii + 574. Price 25s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 17 (68):368-.score: 30.0
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  17. Susan Wolf (1992). Two Levels of Pluralism. Ethics 102 (4):785-798.score: 30.0
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  18. Blake Myers-Schulz, Maia Pujara, Richard Wolf & Michael Koenigs (2013). Inherent Emotional Quality of Human Speech Sounds. Cognition and Emotion 27 (6):1105-1113.score: 30.0
  19. Michael P. Wolf, Philosophy of Language. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
  20. Susan Wolf (2002). A World of Goods. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 64 (2):467–474.score: 30.0
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  21. Susan Wolf (2006). Deconstructing Welfare: Reflections on Stephen Darwall's Welfare and Rational Care. Utilitas 18 (4):415-426.score: 30.0
  22. Susan M. Wolf (2008). Neurolaw: The Big Question. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (1):21 – 22.score: 30.0
  23. Allison B. Wolf (2005). Can Global Justice Provide a Path Toward Achieving Justice Across the Americas? Journal of Global Ethics 1 (2):153 – 176.score: 30.0
    In this article, I investigate actions that the United States took against Costa Rica during the 1980s in order to argue that current discussions about global justice and its foundations are flawed in three ways. First, it misidentifies the parties of global justice as individual citizens. Second, it conceptualizes global justice as exclusively a distributive justice concern and, as a result, it misidentifies what constitutes a global injustice as being the adverse fate of individuals who live in a poor nation. (...)
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  24. Susan Wolf (2010). Good-for-Nothings. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 85 (2):47-64.score: 30.0
    Many academic works as well as many works of art are such that if they had never been produced, no one would be worse off. Yet it is hard to resist the judgment that some such works are good nonetheless. We are rightly grateful that these works were created; we rightly admire them, appreciate them, and take pains to preserve them. And the authors and artists who produced them have reason to be proud. This should lead us to question the (...)
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  25. Clark Wolf (1995). Contemporary Property Rights, Lockean Provisos, and the Interests of Future Generations. Ethics 105 (4):791-818.score: 30.0
  26. Michael P. Wolf (2007). Reference and Incommensurability: What Rigid Designation Won't Get You. [REVIEW] Acta Analytica 22 (3):207-222.score: 30.0
    Causal theories of reference in the philosophy of language and philosophy of science have suggested that it could resolve lingering worries about incommensurability between theoretical claims in different paradigms, to borrow Kuhn’s terms. If we co-refer throughout different paradigms, then the problems of incommensurability are greatly diminished, according to causal theorists. I argue that assuring ourselves of that sort of constancy of reference will require comparable sorts of cross-paradigm affinities, and thus provides us with no special relief on this problem. (...)
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  27. Susan Wolf (1987). The Deflation of Moral Philosophy:Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy. Bernard Williams. Ethics 97 (4):821-.score: 30.0
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  28. Ursula Wolf (1985). Zum Problem der Willensschwäche. Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 39 (1):21 - 33.score: 30.0
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  29. Michael P. Wolf (2006). Rigid Designation and Anaphoric Theories of Reference. Philosophical Studies 130 (2):351 - 375.score: 30.0
    Few philosophers today doubt the importance of some notion of rigid designation, as suggested by Kripke and Putnam for names and natural kind terms. At the very least, most of us want our theories to be compatible with the most plausible elements of that account. Anaphoric theories of reference have gained some attention lately, but little attention has been given to how they square with rigid designation. Although the differences between anaphoric theories and many interpretations of the New Theory of (...)
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  30. Frances S. Grodzinsky, Keith W. Miller & Marty J. Wolf (2008). The Ethics of Designing Artificial Agents. Ethics and Information Technology 10 (2-3):115-121.score: 30.0
    In their important paper “Autonomous Agents”, Floridi and Sanders use “levels of abstraction” to argue that computers are or may soon be moral agents. In this paper we use the same levels of abstraction to illuminate differences between human moral agents and computers. In their paper, Floridi and Sanders contributed definitions of autonomy, moral accountability and responsibility, but they have not explored deeply some essential questions that need to be answered by computer scientists who design artificial agents. One such question (...)
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  31. Ursula Wolf (1988). Über den Sinn der Aristotelische Mesoteslehre. Phronesis 33 (1):54-75.score: 30.0
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  32. Susan Wolf (1986). Above and Below the Line of Duty. Philosophical Topics 14 (2):131-148.score: 30.0
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  33. Michael P. Wolf (2002). The Curious Role of Natural Kind Terms. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 83 (1):81–101.score: 30.0
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  34. Brett A. Williams & Leslie E. Wolf (2013). Biobanking, Consent, and Certificates of Confidentiality: Does the ANPRM Muddy the Water? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (2):440-453.score: 30.0
    In its Advanced Notice of Proposed Rule Making (ANPRM), the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services proposed substantial changes to how biospecimen research is treated under the regulations governing human subjects research. Currently, much of this research can be conducted without consent because it may not be considered “human subjects” research, is considered exempt, or consent may be waived. Responding to criticisms that scientific changes have made biospecimen research riskier than contemplated when the Common Rule was last amended, the (...)
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  35. Michael P. Wolf, Rigid Designation and Natural Kind Terms, Pittsburgh Style. Normative Functionalism and the Pittsburgh School.score: 30.0
    This paper addresses recent literature on rigid designation and natural kind terms that draws on the inferentialist approaches of Sellars and Brandom, among others. Much of the orthodox literature on rigidity may be seen as appealing, more or less explicitly, to a semantic form of “the given” in Sellars’s terms. However, the important insights of that literature may be reconstructed and articulated in terms more congenial to the Pittsburgh school of normative functionalism.
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  36. Julia Wolf (2011). Sustainable Supply Chain Management Integration: A Qualitative Analysis of the German Manufacturing Industry. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 102 (2):221-235.score: 30.0
    Firms are increasingly integrating sustainability into their supply chain management (SCM) practices. The goal is to achieve sustainable flows of products, services, information and capital to provide maximum value to all corporate stakeholders. Prior research on SCM integration has insufficiently addressed sustainability. The objective of this research is to provide for a coherent and testable model of sustainable supply chain management integration (SSCMI). By drawing on four cases from the German manufacturing industry, we seek to identify the most important factors (...)
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  37. Michael P. Wolf (2002). A Grasshopper Walks Into a Bar: The Role of Humour in Normativity. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 32 (3):330–343.score: 30.0
  38. Susan M. Wolf (ed.) (1996). Feminism & Bioethics: Beyond Reproduction. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    Bioethics has paid surprisingly little attention to the special problems faced by women and to feminist analyses of current health care issues other than ...
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  39. Ann Cavoukian, Jules Polonetsky & Christopher Wolf (2010). SmartPrivacy for the Smart Grid: Embedding Privacy Into the Design of Electricity Conservation. [REVIEW] Identity in the Information Society 3 (2):275-294.score: 30.0
    The 2003 blackout in the northern and eastern U.S. and Canada which caused a $6 billion loss in economic revenue is one of many indicators that the current electrical grid is outdated. Not only must the grid become more reliable, it must also become more efficient, reduce its impact on the environment, incorporate alternative energy sources, allow for more consumer choices, and ensure cyber security. In effect, it must become smart. Significant investments in the billions of dollars are being made (...)
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  40. Ursula Wolf (1988). Haben wir moralische Verpflichtungen gegen Tiere. Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 42 (2):222 - 246.score: 30.0
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  41. Michael P. Wolf (2008). Language, Mind, and World: Can't We All Just Get Along? Metaphilosophy 39 (3):363–380.score: 30.0
    This article addresses recent claims made by Richard Rorty about antirepresentationalist theories of meaning. Rorty asserts that a faithful rendering of the core antirepresentationalist assumptions precludes even revised pieces of representationalist semantics like "refers" or "true" and epistemological correlates like "answering to the facts." Rorty even asserts that such notions invite reactionary authoritarian elements that would impede the development of a democratic humanism. I reject this claim and assert that such notions (suitably constructed) pose no greater threat to democratic humanism (...)
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  42. M. J. Wolf, K. W. Miller & F. S. Grodzinsky (2009). On the Meaning of Free Software. Ethics and Information Technology 11 (4):279-286.score: 30.0
    To many who develop and use free software, the GNU General Public License represents an embodiment of the meaning of free software. In this paper we examine the definition and meaning of free software in the context of three events surrounding the GNU General Public License. We use a case involving the GPU software project to establish the importance of Freedom 0 in the meaning of free software. We analyze version 3 of the GNU General Public License and conclude that (...)
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  43. Clark Wolf (1996). Social Choice and Normative Population Theory: A Person Affecting Solution to Parfit's Mere Addition Paradox. Philosophical Studies 81 (2-3):263 - 282.score: 30.0
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  44. Andrew Bailey, Samantha Brennan, Will Kymlicka, Jacob Levy, Alex Sager & Clark Wolf (eds.) (2008). The Broadview Anthology of Social and Political Thought: Volume 2: The Twentieth Century and Beyond. Broadview Press.score: 30.0
    This comprehensive volume contains much of the important work in political and social philosophy from ancient times until the end of the nineteenth century. The anthology offers both depth and breadth in its selection of material by central figures, while also representing other currents of political thought. Thucydides, Seneca, and Cicero are included along with Plato and Aristotle; Al-Farabi, Marsilius of Padua, and de Pizan take their place alongside Augustine and Aquinas; Astell and Constant are presented in the company of (...)
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  45. Susan M. Wolf (1988). Conflict Between Doctor and Patient. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 16 (3-4):197-203.score: 30.0
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  46. Susan M. Wolf (1992). Due Process in Ethics Committee Case Review. HEC Forum 4 (2):83-96.score: 30.0
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  47. Susan M. Wolf (2012). INTRODUCTION: The Challenge of Nanomedicine Human Subjects Research: Protecting Participants, Workers, Bystanders, and the Environment. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (4):712-715.score: 30.0
  48. Susan Wolf & Christopher Grau (eds.) (2013). Understanding Love: Philosophy, Film, & Fiction. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    This collection of original essays, written by scholars from disciplines across the humanities, addresses a wide range of questions about love through a focus on individual films, novels, plays, and works of philosophy. The essays touch on many varieties of love, including friendship, romantic love, parental love, and even the love of an author for her characters. How do social forces shape the types of love that can flourish and sustain themselves? What is the relationship between love and passion? Is (...)
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  49. Susan M. Wolf (1992). Book Review:Surrogate Motherhood: Politics and Privacy. Larry Gostin. [REVIEW] Ethics 102 (3):671-.score: 30.0
  50. Clark Wolf (1996). Markets, Justice, and the Interests of Future Generations. Ethics and the Environment 1 (2):153 - 175.score: 30.0
    This paper considers the extent to which market institutions respond to the needs and morally significant interests of future generations. Such an analysis of the intertemporal effects of markets provides important ground for evaluation of normative social theories, and represents a crucial step toward the development of an adequate account of intergenerational justice. After presenting a prima facie case that markets cannot provide appropriate protections for future needs and interests, I evaluate and reject two of the most promising arguments that (...)
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