Search results for 'Women' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Representing Women (1994). Racism in Pornography and the Women's Movement. In Alison M. Jaggar (ed.), Living with Contradictions: Controversies in Feminist Social Ethics. Westview Press 171.
  2. Toni Adleberg, Morgan Thompson & Eddy Nahmias (2014). Do Men and Women Have Different Philosophical Intuitions? Further Data. Philosophical Psychology 28 (5):615-641.
    To address the underrepresentation of women in philosophy effectively, we must understand the causes of the early loss of women. In this paper we challenge one of the few explanations that has focused on why women might leave philosophy at early stages. Wesley Buckwalter and Stephen Stich offer some evidence that women have different intuitions than men about philosophical thought experiments. We present some concerns about their evidence and we discuss our own study, in which we (...)
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  3.  29
    Speranta Dumitru (2014). From 'Brain Drain' to 'Care Drain': Women's Labor Migration and Methodological Sexism. Women's Studies International Forum 47:203-212.
    The metaphor of “care drain” has been created as a womanly parallel to the “brain drain” idea. Just as “brain drain” suggests that the skilled migrants are an economic loss for the sending country, “care drain” describes the migrant women hired as care workers as a loss of care for their children left behind. This paper criticizes the construction of migrant women as “care drain” for three reasons: 1) it is built on sexist stereotypes, 2) it misrepresents and (...)
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  4.  52
    Maya J. Goldenberg (2010). Perspectives on Evidence-Based Healthcare for Women. Journal of Women's Health 19 (7):1235-1238.
    We live in an age of evidence-based healthcare, where the concept of evidence has been avidly and often uncritically embraced as a symbol of legitimacy, truth, and justice. By letting the evidence dictate healthcare decision making from the bedside to the policy level, the normative claims that inform decision making appear to be negotiated fairly—without subjectivity, prejudice, or bias. Thus, the term ‘‘evidence-based’’ is typically read in the health sciences as the empirically adequate standard of reasonable practice and a means (...)
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  5.  24
    Mariateresa Torchia, Andrea Calabrò & Morten Huse (2011). Women Directors on Corporate Boards: From Tokenism to Critical Mass. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 102 (2):299-317.
    Academic debate on the strategic importance of women corporate directors is widely recognized and still open. However, most corporate boards have only one woman director or a small minority of women directors. Therefore they can still be considered as tokens. This article addresses the following question: does an increased number of women corporate boards result in a build up of critical mass that substantially contributes to firm innovation? The aim is to test if ‘at least three (...)’ could constitute the desired critical mass by identifying different minorities of women directors (one woman, two women and at least three women). Tests are conducted on a sample of 317 Norwegian firms. The results suggest that attaining critical mass – going from one or two women (a few tokens) to at least three women (consistent minority) – makes it possible to enhance the level of firm innovation. Moreover, the results show that the relationship between the critical mass of women directors and the level of firm innovation is mediated by board strategic tasks. Implications for both theory and practice, and future research directions are discussed. (shrink)
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  6.  30
    Morten Huse, Sabina Tacheva Nielsen & Inger Marie Hagen (2009). Women and Employee-Elected Board Members, and Their Contributions to Board Control Tasks. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):581 - 597.
    We present results from a study about women and employee-elected board members, and fill some of the gaps in the literature about their contribution to board effectiveness. The empirical data are from a unique data set of Norwegian firms. Board effectiveness is evaluated in relation to board control tasks, including board corporate social responsibility (CSR) involvement. We found that the contributions of women and employee-elected board members varied depending on the board tasks studied. In the article we also (...)
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  7.  10
    Subrata Chakrabarty & A. Erin Bass (2013). Institutionalizing Ethics in Institutional Voids: Building Positive Ethical Strength to Serve Women Microfinance Borrowers in Negative Contexts. Journal of Business Ethics 119 (4):1-14.
    This study examines whether microfinance institutions (MFIs) that serve women borrowers at the base of the economic pyramid are likely to adopt a written code of positive organizational ethics (POE). Using econometric analysis of operational and economic data of a sample of MFIs from across the world, we find that two contextual factors—poverty level and lack of women’s empowerment—moderate the influence of an MFI’s percentage of women borrowers on the probability of the MFI having a POE code. (...)
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  8.  61
    Neven Sesardic & Rafael De Clercq (2014). Women in Philosophy: Problems with the Discrimination Hypothesis. Academic Questions 27 (4):461-473.
    A number of philosophers attribute the underrepresentation of women in philosophy largely to bias against women or some kind of wrongful discrimination. They cite six sources of evidence to support their contention: (1) gender disparities that increase along the path from undergraduate student to full time faculty member; (2) anecdotal accounts of discrimination in philosophy; (3) research on gender bias in the evaluation of manuscripts, grants, and curricula vitae in other academic disciplines; (4) psychological research on implicit bias; (...)
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  9.  3
    Amy Trauger, Carolyn Sachs, Mary Barbercheck, Kathy Brasier & Nancy Ellen Kiernan (2010). “Our Market is Our Community”: Women Farmers and Civic Agriculture in Pennsylvania, USA. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 27 (1):43-55.
    Civic agriculture is characterized in the literature as complementary and embedded social and economic strategies that provide economic benefits to farmers at the same time that they ostensibly provide socio-environmental benefits to the community. This paper presents some ways in which women farmers practice civic agriculture. The data come from in-depth interviews with women practicing agriculture in Pennsylvania. Some of the strategies women farmers use to make a living from the farm have little to do with food (...)
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  10.  95
    Sarah Lucia Hoagland (2007). Review Essay: Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Justice. Hypatia 22 (2):182-188.
    Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Justice by JAEL SILLIMAN, MARLENE GERBER FRIED, LORETTA ROSS, and ELENA R. GUTIÉRREZ. Boston: South End Press, 2004; Policing the National Body: Race, Gender, and Criminalization, ed. JAEL SILLIMAN and ANANNYA BHATTACHARJEE. Cambridge, Mass.: South End Press, 2002; and Conquest: Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide. ANDREA SMITH. Boston: South End Press, 2005.
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  11.  61
    Zena Burgess & Phyllis Tharenou (2002). Women Board Directors: Characteristics of the Few. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 37 (1):39 - 49.
    Appointment as a director of a company board often represents the pinnacle of a management career. Worldwide, it has been noted that very few women are appointed to the boards of directors of companies. Blame for the low numbers of women of company boards can be partly attributed to the widely publicized "glass ceiling". However, the very low representation of women on company boards requires further examination. This article reviews the current state of women's representation on (...)
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  12.  32
    Jacqueline Broad (2002). Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century. Cambridge University Press.
    In this rich and detailed study of early modern women's thought, Jacqueline Broad explores the complexity of women's responses to Cartesian philosophy and its intellectual legacy in England and Europe. She examines the work of thinkers such as Mary Astell, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Margaret Cavendish, Anne Conway and Damaris Masham, who were active participants in the intellectual life of their time and were also the respected colleagues of philosophers such as Descartes, Leibniz and Locke. She also illuminates the (...)
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  13.  6
    Anna C. Mastroianni, Ruth R. Faden & Daniel D. Federman (eds.) (1994). Women and Health Research: Ethical and Legal Issues of Including Women in Clinical Studies. National Academy Press.
    Executive Summary There is a general perception that biomedical research has not given the same attention to the health problems of women that it has given ...
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  14.  3
    Susan Moller Okin (1980). Women in Western Political Thought. Princeton University Press.
    Susan Moller Okin. AFTERWORD or greater weighting of these over “masculine" values. For how are women to continue to assume all of the nurturing activities that allegedly both follow from and reinforce their “naturally” superior virtues, and  ...
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  15.  13
    Marina Prieto-Carrón (2008). Women Workers, Industrialization, Global Supply Chains and Corporate Codes of Conduct. Journal of Business Ethics 83 (1):5 - 17.
    The restructured globalized economy has provided women with employment opportunities. Globalisation has also meant a shift towards self-regulation of multinationals as part of the restructuring of the world economy that increases among others things, flexible employment practices, worsening of labour conditions and lower wages for many women workers around the world. In this context, as part of the global trend emphasising Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in the 1980s, one important development has been the growth of voluntary Corporate Codes (...)
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  16.  6
    Diana Tietjens Meyers (2002). Gender in the Mirror: Cultural Imagery and Women's Agency. OUP Usa.
    The cultural imagery of women is deeply ingrained in our consciousness. So deeply, in fact, that feminists see this as a fundamental threat to female autonomy because it enshrines procreative heterosexuality as well as the relations of domination and subordination between men and women. Diana Meyers' book is about this cultural imagery - and how, once it is internalized, it shapes perception, reflection, judgement, and desire. These intergral images have a deep impact not only on the individual psyche, (...)
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  17.  40
    Sylvia Tamale (2008). The Right to Culture and the Culture of Rights: A Critical Perspective on Women's Sexual Rights in Africa. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 16 (1):47-69.
    The opposition of ‘culture’ and ‘rights’ is not uncommon in feminist legal discourse. This article argues that such an approach is fraught with danger as it creates an extremely restrictive framework within which African women can challenge domination; it limits our strategic interventions for transforming society and essentially plays into the hands of those seeking to perpetuate and solidify the existing structures of patriarchy. Drawing examples from a parallel research on Gender, Law and Sexuality, I propose that a more (...)
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  18.  79
    Prasita Mukherjee (2012). Revolutionizing Agency: Sameness and Difference in the Representation of Women by Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain and Mahasweta Devi. ARGUMENT 2 (1):117-127.
    In this paper the sameness and difference between two distinguished Indian authors, Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain (1880–1932) and Mahasweta Devi (b. 1926), representing two generations almost a century apart, will be under analysis in order to trace the generational transformation in women’s writing in India, especially Bengal. Situated in the colonial and postcolonial frames of history, Hossain and Mahasweta Devi may be contextualized differently. At the same time their subjects are also differently categorized; the former is not particularly concerned with (...)
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  19.  74
    Urszula Chowaniec & Marzenna Jakubczak (2012). Conceptualizing Generation and Transformation in Women’s Writing. ARGUMENT 2 (1):5-15.
    The main objective of this collection of papers is to explore ideas of generation and transformation in the context of postdependency discourse as it may be traced in women’s writing published in Bengali, Polish, Czech, Russian and English. As we believe, literature does not have merely a descriptive function or a purely visionary quality but serves also as a discursive medium, which is rhetorically sophisticated, imaginatively influential and stimulates cultural dynamics. It is an essential carrier of collective memory and (...)
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  20. George Yancy (ed.) (2010). The Center Must Not Hold: White Women Philosophers on the Whiteness of Philosophy. Lexington Books.
    In this collection, white women philosophers engage boldly in critical acts of exploring ways of naming and disrupting whiteness in terms of how it has defined the conceptual field of philosophy. Focuses on the whiteness of the epistemic and value-laden norms within philosophy itself, the text dares to identify the proverbial elephant in the room known as white supremacy and how that supremacy functions as the measure of reason, knowledge, and philosophical intelligibility.
     
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  21.  71
    Marja Rytkӧnen (2012). Memorable Fiction. Evoking Emotions and Family Bonds in Post-Soviet Russian Women’s Writing. ARGUMENT 2 (1):59-74.
    This article deals with women-centred prose texts of the 1990s and 2000s in Russia written by women, and focuses especially on generation narratives. By this term the author means fictional texts that explore generational relations within families, from the perspective of repressed experiences, feelings and attitudes in the Soviet period. The selected texts are interpreted as narrating and conceptualizing the consequences of patriarchal ideology for relations between mothers and daughters and for reconstructing connections between Soviet and post-Soviet by (...)
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  22.  32
    Talia Mae Bettcher (2013). Trans Women and Interpretive Intimacy: Some Initial Reflections”. In D. Castenada (ed.), The Essential Handbook of Women's Sexuality. Praeger 51-68.
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  23.  1
    Pragna Patel (2008). Faith in the State? Asian Women's Struggles for Human Rights in the U.K. Feminist Legal Studies 16 (1):9-36.
    The discourse of multiculturalism provides a useful means of understanding the complexities, tensions, and dilemmas that Asian and other minority women in the U.K. grapple with in their quest for human rights. However, the adoption of multiculturalist approaches has also silenced women’s voices, obscuring, for example, the role of the family in gendered violence and abuse. Focusing on the work of Southall Black Sisters, and locating this work within current debates on the intersection of government policy, cultural diversity, (...)
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  24.  16
    Patricia H. Werhane (2007). Women Leaders in a Globalized World. Journal of Business Ethics 74 (4):425 - 435.
    This article will defend a very simple thesis. In a diverse globalized “flat” world with expanding economic opportunities and risks, we will need to revisit and revise our mindsets about free enterprise, corporate governance, and leadership. That we can change our mindsets and world view is illustrated by studies of primate behavior, and the kind of leadership necessary in a global economy is, interestingly, exemplified by women.
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  25.  8
    April Bleske-Rechek & Melissa Lighthall (2010). Attractiveness and Rivalry in Women's Friendships with Women. Human Nature 21 (1):82-97.
    Past research suggests that young women perceive their same-sex friends as both facilitating the pursuit of desirable mates and competing for access to desirable mates. We propose that similar levels of physical attractiveness between young adult female friends might be one explanation for the opposing forces in their friendships. Forty-six female friendship pairs completed questionnaires about themselves, their friend, and their friendship; in addition, each woman’s picture was rated by a set of nine naive judges. Friends were similar in (...)
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  26.  5
    Jacob M. Vigil, David C. Geary & Jennifer Byrd-Craven (2006). Trade-Offs in Low-Income Women's Mate Preferences. Human Nature 17 (3):319-336.
    A sample of 460 low-income women completed a mate preference questionnaire and surveys that assessed family background, life history, conscientiousness, sexual motives, self-ratings (e.g., looks), and current circumstances (e.g., income). A cluster analysis revealed two groups of women: women who reported a strong preference for looks and money in a short-term mate and commitment in a long-term mate, and women who reported smaller differences across mating context. Group differences were found in reported educational levels, family background, (...)
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  27.  26
    Anna-Maija Lämsä & Teppo Sintonen (2001). A Discursive Approach to Understanding Women Leaders in Working Life. Journal of Business Ethics 34 (3-4):255 - 267.
    In this paper, we develop a theoretical framework for understanding women leaders in working life. Our starting point is in statistics and earlier women-in-management literature, which show that women leaders represent a minority of the managerial population. We assume such underlying mechanisms causing discriminatory practices towards women leaders to exist which have become naturalized and invisible. Our concern is that everyone irrespective of gender should have a fair chance in career progression. This is both a moral (...)
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  28.  60
    Myrtle P. Bell, Mary E. Mclaughlin & Jennifer M. Sequeira (2002). Discrimination, Harassment, and the Glass Ceiling: Women Executives as Change Agents. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 37 (1):65 - 76.
    In this article, we discuss the relationships between discrimination, harassment, and the glass ceiling, arguing that many of the factors that preclude women from occupying executive and managerial positions also foster sexual harassment. We suggest that measures designed to increase numbers of women in higher level positions will reduce sexual harassment. We first define and discuss discrimination, harassment, and the glass ceiling, relationships between each, and relevant legislation. We next discuss the relationships between gender and sexual harassment, emphasizing (...)
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  29.  14
    Rosemarie Tong (2001). Towards a Feminist Global Bioethics: Addressing Women's Health Concerns Worldwide. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 9 (2):229-246.
    In this paper I argue that a global bioethicsis possible. Specifically, I present the viewthat there are within feminist approaches tobioethics some conceptual and methodologicaltools necessary to forge a bioethics thatembraces the health-related concerns of bothdeveloping and developed nations equally. Tosupport my argument I discuss some of thechallenges that have historically confrontedfeminists. If feminists accept the idea thatwomen are entirely the same, then feministspresent as fact the fiction of the essential``Woman.'' Not only does ``Woman'' not exist,``she'' obscures important racial, ethnic,cultural, (...)
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  30.  5
    Catherine Villanueva Gardner (2000). Rediscovering Women Philosophers: Philosophical Genre and the Boundaries of Philosophy. Westview.
    This book examines the philosophical foremothers of women’s philosophy and explores what their work may have to offer modern theorizing in feminist ethics. Through such writers as Catharine Macaulay, Mary Wollstonecraft, and George Eliot, Gardner interprets a varied selection of moral philosophers in an attempt both to contribute to our understanding of their work, and perhaps even to encourage other philosophers to interpretive work of their own. She also looks into the reasons such forms as novels, letters, and poetry (...)
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  31.  3
    Ina Wagner (1993). Women's Voice: The Case of Nursing Information Systems. [REVIEW] AI and Society 7 (4):295-310.
    This paper looks at the cultural transformation of nursing. It argues that introducing computers in a female occupation is not simply a case of imposing ‘male’ technology on ‘female’ care-oriented practices and values. In order to understand current changes of nursing practice, three points of view have to be simultaneously kept in focus: 1) the differences between women's interests and ambitions; 2) the readings of a technology that have already been established through previous examples of design and use (in (...)
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  32.  28
    Paquita De Zulueta (2001). Randomised Placebo-Controlled Trials and HIV-Infected Pregnant Women in Developing Countries. Ethical Imperialism or Unethical Exploitation. Bioethics 15 (4):289–311.
    In this paper, I provide a brief summary of the context, outline the arguments for and against the controversial use of placebo controls, and focus on particular areas that I believe merit further discussion or clarification. On balance, I argue that the researchers failed in their duties to protect the best interests of their research subjects, and to promote distributive justice. I discuss the difficulties of obtaining valid consent in this research context, and argue that it is unethical to inform (...)
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  33.  21
    Desh Raj Sirswal & Dinesh Chahal (2014). Women Empowerment in Present Times. In R. B. S. Verma (ed.), GENDER MAINSTREAMING:PROBLEMS AND PROSPECTS. 110-114.
    Women Empowerment in Present Times -/- Dr. Dinesh Chahal (Department of Education, Central University of Haryana, Mahendergarh) -/- Dr. Desh Raj Sirswal (Department of Philosophy, P.G. Govt. College for Girls, Sector-11, Chandigarh) -/- India is one of the developing nations of the modern world. It has become an independent country, a republic, more than a half century ago. During this period the country has been engaged in efforts to attain development and growth in various areas such as building infrastructure, (...)
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  34.  18
    Mary Briody Mahowald (2006). Bioethics and Women: Across the Life Span. Oxford University Press.
    All persons, while different from one another, have the same value: this is the author's relatively uncontroversial starting point. Her end point is not uncontroversial: an ideal of justice as human flourishing, based on each person's unique set of capabilities. Because the book's focus is women's health care, gender justice, a necessary component of justice, is central to examination of the issues. Classical pragmatists and feminist standpoint theorists are enlisted in support of a strategy by which gender justice is (...)
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  35.  37
    Elena Sokol (2012). Diverse Voices: Czech Women’s Writing in the Post-Communist Era. ARGUMENT 2 (1):37-57.
    This essay offers an overview of the diversity of women’s prose writing that emerged on the Czech cultural scene in the post-communist era. To that end it briefly characterizes the work of eight Czech women authors who were born within the first two decades after World War II and began to create during the post-1968 era of ‘normalization’. In this broad sense they belong to a single generation. With rare exception their work was not officially published in their (...)
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  36.  61
    Alison M. Jaggar (2002). Vulnerable Women and Neo-Liberal Globalization: Debt Burdens Undermine Women's Health in the Global South. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (6):425-440.
    Contemporary processes of globalization havebeen accompanied by a serious deterioration inthe health of many women across the world. Particularly disturbing is the drastic declinein the health status of many women in theglobal South, as well as some women in theglobal North. This paper argues that thehealth vulnerability of women in the globalSouth is inseparable from their political andeconomic vulnerability. More specifically, itlinks the deteriorating health of many Southernwomen with the neo-liberal economic policiesthat characterize contemporary economicglobalization and (...)
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  37.  3
    Hilary Charlesworth (2008). Are Women Peaceful? Reflections on the Role of Women in Peace-Building. Feminist Legal Studies 16 (3):347-361.
    This paper examines the way that women’s relationship to peace is constructed in international institutions and international law. It identifies a set of claims about women and peace that are typically made and considers these in light of women’s experience in the conflicts in Bougainville, East Timor and the Solomon Islands.
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  38.  11
    Catherine L. Welch, Denice E. Welch & Lisa Hewerdine (2008). Gender and Export Behaviour: Evidence From Women-Owned Enterprises. Journal of Business Ethics 83 (1):113 - 126.
    This article draws on the results of a qualitative, exploratory study of 20 Australian women business owners to demonstrate how using a ‹gender as social identity’ lens provides new insights into the influence of gender on exporting and entrepreneurial behaviour. Interview data reveal perceptions of gender identity and gender relations varied and influenced the interpretations which women business owners placed on their exporting activities. Women in the study used different terms to describe exporter and entrepreneurial characteristics to (...)
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  39.  11
    Steven E. Lindquist (2008). Gender at Janaka's Court: Women in the Bṛhadāraṇyaka Upaniṣad Reconsidered. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 36 (3):405-426.
    The female characters in the Br̥hadāraṇyaka Upaniṣad have generally been interpreted by scholars in two opposing fashions: as fictional characters whose historicity can be dismissed or as representative of actual women in ancient India. Both of these interpretations, however, overlook the literary elements of this text and the role that these female characters play within the larger philosophical debate. This paper is an analysis of the various women who appear in the Br̥hadāraṇyaka and their role in this text. (...)
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  40.  4
    Sherene H. Razack (2007). The 'Sharia Law Debate' in Ontario: The Modernity/Premodernity Distinction in Legal Efforts to Protect Women From Culture. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 15 (1):3-32.
    The normative figure in Western feminism remains the liberal autonomous individual of modernity. ‹Other’ women are those who have their freedom to choose restricted. Typically, ‹other’ women are those burdened by culture and hindered by their communities from entering modernity. If we remain in the terrain of thinking about women as vulnerable or imperilled, and some women as particularly imperilled, as we generally do of Muslim women, we remain squarely within the framework of patriarchy understood (...)
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  41.  1
    Timothy Adair (2008). HIV Status and Age at First Marriage Among Women in Cameroon. Journal of Biosocial Science 40 (5):743-760.
    Summary Recent research has highlighted the risk of HIV infection for married teenage women compared with their unmarried counterparts (Clark, 2004). This study assesses whether a relationship exists, for women who have completed their adolescence (age 20–29 years), between HIV status with age at first marriage and the length of time between first sex and first marriage. Multivariate analysis utilizing the nationally representative 2004 Cameroon Demographic and Health Survey shows that late-marrying women and those with a longer (...)
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  42.  12
    Eddy S. Ng & Willi H. Wiesner (2007). Are Men Always Picked Over Women? The Effects of Employment Equity Directives on Selection Decisions. Journal of Business Ethics 76 (2):177 - 187.
    This study replicates and extends previous work by Oppenheimer and Wiesner [1990, Sex discrimination: Who is hired and do employment equity statements make a difference? Proceedings of the 11th Annual Conference of the Administrative Sciences Association of Canada, Personnel and Human Resources Division], and examined the effects of minority qualifications on hiring decisions, the effects of employment equity directives when minority candidates are less qualified and the effects of different types and strengths of employment equity directives on hiring decisions. The (...)
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  43. Nancy J. Hirschmann (2008). Mill, Political Economy, and Women's Work. American Political Science Review 102 (2):199-203.
    The sexual division of labor and the social and economic value of women’s work in the home has been a problem that scholars have struggled with at least since the advent of the “second wave” women’s movement, but it has never entered into the primary discourses of political science. This paper argues that John Stuart Mill’s Political Economy provides innovative and useful arguments that address this thorny problem. Productive labor is essential to Mill’s conception of property, and property (...)
     
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  44.  17
    Ann A. Pang‐White (2013). Zhu Xi on Family and Women: Challenges and Potentials. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (3-4):436-455.
    This article reappraises Zhu Xi's philosophy of women. First, it examines Zhu's descriptive texts. Second, it analyzes Zhu's didactic texts on li, qi, yin, yang, and gender. It finds that (i) surprisingly Zhu exhibited a level of flexibility toward women on subjects of education, property rights, and household management; (ii) his view on the male/yang and female/yin relationship was inconsistent; and (iii) improvement on Zhu's social-political teaching on women's role could result from a more consistent development of (...)
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  45.  3
    Elsje Bonthuys (2006). Women's Sexuality in the South African Constitutional Court. Feminist Legal Studies 14 (3):391-406.
    In 2002 the constitutionality of the Sexual Offences Act, which criminalizes the behaviour of sex workers but fails to punish their clients, was at issue in the South African Constitutional Court. The majority of the Court held that the legislation does not constitute indirect discrimination on the basis of gender. The minority judgment found indirect gender discrimination, but held that the legislation did not infringe upon sex workers’ rights to dignity and privacy. This note argues that the reasoning in both (...)
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  46.  14
    Shari Stone-Mediatore (2004). Women's Rights and Cultural Differences. Studies in Practical Philosophy 4 (2):111-133.
    The rights of women in fundamentalist Muslim countries has become a cause celebre for many North American women; however, the problem of how to balance respect for women's rights and respect for cultural differences remains in dispute, even within feminist theory. This paper explores how U.S. feminists who are serious about supporting the struggles of women across cultural borders might best adjudicate the seeming tension between women's rights and cultural autonomy. Upon examining 4 representative approaches (...)
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  47.  82
    Beverly Dawn Metcalfe (2008). Women, Management and Globalization in the Middle East. Journal of Business Ethics 83 (1):85 - 100.
    This paper provides new theoretical insights into the interconnections and relationships between women, management and globalization in the Middle East (ME). The discussion is positioned within broader globalization debates about women’s social status in ME economies. Based on case study evidence and the UN datasets, the article critiques social, cultural and economic reasons for women’s limited advancement in the public sphere. These include the prevalence of the patriarchal work contract within public and private institutions, as well as (...)
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  48.  1
    Jessica Gordon‐Roth & Nancy Kendrick (2015). Including Early Modern Women Writers in Survey Courses. Metaphilosophy 46 (3):364-379.
    There are many reasons to include texts written by women in early modern philosophy courses. The most obvious one is accuracy: women helped to shape the philosophical landscape of the time. Thus, to craft a syllabus that wholly excludes women is to give students an inaccurate picture of the early modern period. Since it seems safe to assume that we all aim for accuracy, this should be reason enough to include women writers in our courses. This (...)
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    Toby Schonfeld (2013). The Perils of Protection: Vulnerability and Women in Clinical Research. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (3):189-206.
    Subpart B of 45 Code of Federal Regulations Part 46 (CFR) identifies the criteria according to which research involving pregnant women, human fetuses, and neonates can be conducted ethically in the United States. As such, pregnant women and fetuses fall into a category requiring “additional protections,” often referred to as “vulnerable populations.” The CFR does not define vulnerability, but merely gives examples of vulnerable groups by pointing to different categories of potential research subjects needing additional protections. In this (...)
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    Therese Boos Dykeman (ed.) (1999). The Neglected Canon: Nine Women Philosophers: First to the Twentieth Century. Kluwer Academic.
    The outstanding points of The Neglected Canon are that it provides a multicultural anthology of women philosophers: Chinese, European, North and Central American, that it provides a history of women philosophers through selected works from the first century to the beginning of the twentieth century, and that it provides unusual comprehensiveness in its bibliographies, biographies, and introductions to the works. In these three points it offers a more complete text than any yet on the market in this field. (...)
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