Search results for 'Women Health and hygiene' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mary Briody Mahowald (2006). Bioethics and Women: Across the Life Span. Oxford University Press.score: 79.0
    All persons, while different from one another, have the same value: this is the author's relatively uncontroversial starting point. Her end point is not uncontroversial: an ideal of justice as human flourishing, based on each person's unique set of capabilities. Because the book's focus is women's health care, gender justice, a necessary component of justice, is central to examination of the issues. Classical pragmatists and feminist standpoint theorists are enlisted in support of a strategy by which gender justice (...)
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  2. Rosemarie Tong (2001). Towards a Feminist Global Bioethics: Addressing Women's Health Concerns Worldwide. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 9 (2):229-246.score: 75.0
    In this paper I argue that a global bioethicsis possible. Specifically, I present the viewthat there are within feminist approaches tobioethics some conceptual and methodologicaltools necessary to forge a bioethics thatembraces the health-related concerns of bothdeveloping and developed nations equally. Tosupport my argument I discuss some of thechallenges that have historically confrontedfeminists. If feminists accept the idea thatwomen are entirely the same, then feministspresent as fact the fiction of the essential``Woman.'' Not only does ``Woman'' not exist,``she'' obscures important racial, (...)
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  3. Alison M. Jaggar (2002). Vulnerable Women and Neo-Liberal Globalization: Debt Burdens Undermine Women's Health in the Global South. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (6):425-440.score: 72.0
    Contemporary processes of globalization havebeen accompanied by a serious deterioration inthe health of many women across the world. Particularly disturbing is the drastic declinein the health status of many women in theglobal South, as well as some women in theglobal North. This paper argues that thehealth vulnerability of women in the globalSouth is inseparable from their political andeconomic vulnerability. More specifically, itlinks the deteriorating health of many Southernwomen with the neo-liberal economic policiesthat characterize (...)
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  4. Anna C. Mastroianni, Ruth R. Faden & Daniel D. Federman (eds.) (1994). Women and Health Research: Ethical and Legal Issues of Including Women in Clinical Studies. National Academy Press.score: 72.0
    Executive Summary There is a general perception that biomedical research has not given the same attention to the health problems of women that it has given ...
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  5. Jalil Safaei (2009). Democracy and Women's Health. Mens Sana Monographs 7 (1):20.score: 72.0
    _New research on broader determinants of health has culminated into the new paradigm of social determinants of health. The fundamental view that underlies this new paradigm is that socioeconomic and political contexts in which people live have significant bearing upon their health and well-being. Unlike a wealth of research on socioeconomic determinants, few studies have focused on the role of political factors. Some of these studies examine the role of political determinants on health through their mediation (...)
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  6. Jalil Safaei (2012). Democracy, Human Rights and Women's Health. Mens Sana Monographs 10 (1):134.score: 72.0
    Significant improvements in human rights and democracy have been made since the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights by the United Nations in 1948. Yet, human rights, especially women's rights, are still being violated in many parts of the developing world. The adverse effects of such violations on women's and children's health are well known, but they are rarely measured. This study uses cross-national data from over 145 countries to estimate the impact of democracy and (...)
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  7. Susan Sherwin (1992). No Longer Patient: Feminist Ethics and Health Care. Temple University Press.score: 67.0
    Her careful building of positions, her unique approaches to analyzing problems, and her excellent insights make this an important work for feminists, those ...
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  8. Muktananda Saraswati (1977). Nawa Yogini Tantra: For Every Woman Who Seeks Health, Happiness, and Self-Realization. Bihar School of Yoga.score: 67.0
     
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  9. E. Thomson (2001). Physiology, Hygiene and the Entry of Women to the Medical Profession in Edinburgh C. 1869-C. 1900. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 32 (1):105-126.score: 63.0
    Academic physiology, as it was taught by John Hughes Bennett during the 1870s, involved an understanding of the functions of the human body and the physical laws which governed those functions. This knowledge was perceived to be directly relevant and applicable to clinical practice in terms of maintaining bodily hygiene and human health. The first generation of medical women received their physiological education at Edinburgh University under Bennett, who emphasised the importance of physiology for women due (...)
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  10. Carol McDonald & Marjorie McIntyre (2002). Women's Health, Women's Health Care: Complicating Experience, Language and Ideologies. Nursing Philosophy 3 (3):260-267.score: 60.0
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  11. López de la Vieja & Ma Teresa (eds.) (2006). Bioética y Feminismo: Estudios Multidisciplinares de Género. Ediciones Universidad de Salamanca.score: 58.0
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  12. Maya J. Goldenberg (2010). Perspectives on Evidence-Based Healthcare for Women. Journal of Women's Health 19 (7):1235-1238.score: 57.0
    We live in an age of evidence-based healthcare, where the concept of evidence has been avidly and often uncritically embraced as a symbol of legitimacy, truth, and justice. By letting the evidence dictate healthcare decision making from the bedside to the policy level, the normative claims that inform decision making appear to be negotiated fairly—without subjectivity, prejudice, or bias. Thus, the term ‘‘evidence-based’’ is typically read in the health sciences as the empirically adequate standard of reasonable practice and a (...)
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  13. Sofia Gruskin, Shahira Ahmed & Laura Ferguson (2008). Provider-Initiated Hiv Testing and Counseling in Health Facilities – What Does This Mean for the Health and Human Rights of Pregnant Women? Developing World Bioethics 8 (1):23–32.score: 54.0
    Since the introduction of drugs to prevent vertical transmission of HIV, the purpose of and approach to HIV testing of pregnant women has increasingly become an area of major controversy. In recent years, many strategies to increase the uptake of HIV testing have focused on offering HIV tests to women in pregnancy-related services. New global guidance issued by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) specifically notes these services as an (...)
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  14. S. Pomfret, Q. A. Karim & S. R. Benatar (2010). Inclusion of Adolescent Women in Microbicide Trials: A Public Health Imperative! Public Health Ethics 3 (1):39-50.score: 51.0
    Conventional and well-established guidelines for the ethical conduct of clinical research are necessary but not sufficient for addressing research dilemmas related to public health research. There is a particular need for a public health ethics framework when, in the face of an epidemic, research is urgently needed to promote the common good. While there is limited experience in the use of a public health ethics framework, the value and potential of such an approach is increasingly being appreciated. (...)
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  15. Nancy Tuana (2006). The Speculum of Ignorance: The Women's Health Movement and Epistemologies of Ignorance. Hypatia 21 (3):1-19.score: 48.0
    : This essay aims to clarify the value of developing systematic studies of ignorance as a component of any robust theory of knowledge. The author employs feminist efforts to recover and create knowledge of women's bodies in the contemporary women's health movement as a case study for cataloging different types of ignorance and shedding light on the nature of their production. She also helps us understand the ways resistance movements can be a helpful site for understanding how (...)
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  16. Kristin Janssens, Marleen Bosmans, Els Leye & Marleen Temmerman (2006). Sexual and Reproductive Health of Asylum-Seeking and Refugee Women in Europe: Entitlements and Access to Health Services. Journal of Global Ethics 2 (2):183 – 196.score: 48.0
    Asylum-seeking and refugee women (ASRW) are population groups characterized by diverse social, economic and legal backgrounds as well as diverse needs. Their backgrounds of forced migration have a profound impact on their overall health, including their sexual and reproductive health (SRH). In Europe, the SRH needs of ASRW are usually more pressing than those of the host country population. In the context of refugee health, it is important to distinguish between asylum seekers and statutory refugees, as (...)
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  17. Ruth Macklin (2009). Global Inequalities in Women's Health. Philosophical Topics 37 (2):93-108.score: 48.0
    Empirical evidence confirms the existence of health inequalities between women and men in developing countries, with women experiencing poorer health status than men, as well as less access to vital health services. These disparities have different sources and take different forms, some of which result from cultural factors, others from discriminatory laws and practices, and still others from the biological fact that only women undergo pregnancy and childbirth, a major cause of maternal mortality. The (...)
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  18. R. Yoshida (2011). Ireland's Restrictive Abortion Law: A Threat to Women's Health and Rights? Clinical Ethics 6 (4):172-178.score: 48.0
    The Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights has recently handed down its judgement in the case of three women contesting the abortion law in the Republic of Ireland, which has one of the most restrictive abortion laws in the world. Although the Court ruled that Ireland had to clarify the current law following the success of one of the three claims, the failure of the other two claims allows Ireland to continue to enforce its law, which (...)
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  19. Jonathan Toms (2012). Political Dimensions of 'the psychosocial'The 1948 International Congress on Mental Health and the Mental Hygiene Movement. History of the Human Sciences 25 (5):91-106.score: 48.0
    The Foucaultian sociologist Nikolas Rose has influentially argued that psychosocial technologies have offered means through which the ideals of democracy can be made congruent with the management of social life and the government of citizens in modern western liberal democracies. This interpretation is contested here through an examination of the 1948 International Congress on Mental Health held in London and the mental hygiene movement that organized it. It is argued that, in Britain, this movement’s theory and practice represents (...)
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  20. Helen Bequaert Holmes (2001). When Health Means Wealth, Can Bioethicists Respond? Health Care Analysis 9 (2):213-228.score: 48.0
    Around the world the wealthy can get their lives extended while the poorget little basic medical help. Over the same years that the field ofbioethics has prospered and expanded, this disparity has increased.Reasons for the failure of bioethics to successfully address thishealth/wealth issue include its identification with the cognitiveand social authority of medicine; its gatekeeping behavior;its funding sources; its questionable use of ``principlism'' andits emphasis on crises and dilemmas to the neglect of ``housekeeping''issues. The work of most women in (...)
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  21. Amanda R. Clarke (2011). Beyond Reproduction: Women's Health, Activism, and Public Policy. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (2):159-164.score: 48.0
    In the current political climate, understanding women’s health is necessary to achieve progressive and equitable health care reform. Women access the healthcare system more frequently and in greater numbers than men, and are more likely to vote at the polls.1 Yet politicians, corporations, activists, and patients continue to disagree on the scope and definition of women’s health. In her book Beyond Reproduction: Women’s Health, Activism, and Public Policy, Karen L. Baird offers a (...)
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  22. Susan Dodds (2008). Inclusion and Exclusion in Women's Access to Health and Medicine. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (2):58 - 79.score: 48.0
    Women's access to health and medicine in developed countries has been characterized by a range of inconsistent inclusions and exclusions. Health policy has been asymmetrically interested in womens reproductive capacities and has sought to regulate, control, and manage aspects of womens reproductive decision making in a manner unwitnessed in relation to men's reproductive health and reproductive decision making. In other areas, research that addresses health concerns that affect both men and women sometimes is designed (...)
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  23. Zuhal Bahar, Hale Okçay, şeyda Özbıçakçı, Ayşe Beşer, Besti üstün & Meryem Öztürk (2005). The Effects of Islam and Traditional Practices on Women's Health and Reproduction. Nursing Ethics 12 (6):557-570.score: 48.0
    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Islam as a religion and culture on Turkish women’s health. The study included 138 household members residing in the territory of three primary health care centers in Turkey: Güzelbahçe, Fahrettin Altay and Esentepe. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire prepared by a multidisciplinary team that included specialists from the departments of public health, psychiatric nursing and sociology. We found that the women’s (...) behavior changed from traditional to rational as education levels increased, and that religious and traditional attitudes and behaviors were predominant in the countryside, especially practices related to pregnancy, delivery, the postpartum period, induced abortion and family planning. One of the most important prerequisites for the improvement of women’s health is that nurses should know the religious practices and culture of the society for which they provide care, so that their efforts to protect and improve women’s health will be effective. (shrink)
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  24. Melanie Latham (2001). Deregulation and Emergency Contraception: A Way Forward for Women's Health Care? [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 9 (3):221-246.score: 48.0
    A deregulation of medicines is currently underway in the U.K. and France. Emergency contraception has become available over the counter in pharmacies in both countries. This might constitute a further step in the liberalisation of contraception, something which has always received support from women’s organisations and from women themselves. It also forms part of a current revolution in patient behaviour. This article examines the law governing the deregulation of emergency contraception in the U.K. and France and assesses how (...)
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  25. M. C. Kaveny (2005). The Order of Widows: What the Early Church Can Teach Us About Older Women and Health Care. Christian Bioethics 11 (1):11-34.score: 48.0
    This article argues that the early Christian ?order of widows? provides a fruitful model for Christian ethicists struggling to address the medical and social problems of elderly women today. After outlining the precarious state of the ?almanah? - or widow - in biblical times, it describes the emergence of the order of widows in the early Church. Turning to the contemporary situation, it argues that demographics both in the United States and around the globe suggest that meeting the needs (...)
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  26. Jamie P. Ross, Feminists Who Do: Bridging Insight to Practice in Comprehensive Women’s Health Care.score: 48.0
    A qualitative and quantitative understanding of disease variables in relation to local understandings and values is an important dimension that broadens traditional evidence-based medicine (EBM) and is necessary in order to navigate the social perspectives of policymakers. There are dimensions of this research that share the values and practices of feminist research. This paper offers an epistemological analysis of theory and practice that can provide more effective outcomes in women’s health. PATH (Policy Advisory Towards Health) for (...), bridges the knowledge gap between research and direct service by providing translational support for community organizations’ legislative policy agendas. (shrink)
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  27. Cynthia Eyakuze, Debra A. Jones, Ann M. Starrs & Naomi Sorkin (2008). From Pmtct to a More Comprehensive Aids Response for Women: A Much-Needed Shift. Developing World Bioethics 8 (1):33–42.score: 45.0
    Half of the 33.2 million people living with HIV today are women. Yet, responses to the epidemic are not adequately meeting the needs of women. This article critically evaluates how prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) programs, the principal framework under which women's health is currently addressed in the global response to AIDS, have tended to focus on the prevention of HIV transmission from HIV-positive women to their infants. This paper concludes that more than ten years (...)
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  28. Timothy Adair (2008). HIV Status and Age at First Marriage Among Women in Cameroon. Journal of Biosocial Science 40 (5):743-760.score: 45.0
    Summary Recent research has highlighted the risk of HIV infection for married teenage women compared with their unmarried counterparts (Clark, 2004). This study assesses whether a relationship exists, for women who have completed their adolescence (age 20–29 years), between HIV status with age at first marriage and the length of time between first sex and first marriage. Multivariate analysis utilizing the nationally representative 2004 Cameroon Demographic and Health Survey shows that late-marrying women and those with a (...)
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  29. Timothy Adair (2009). Unmet Need for Contraception Among HIV-Positive Women in Lesotho and Implications for Mother-to-Child Transmission. Journal of Biosocial Science 41 (2):269-278.score: 45.0
    In Lesotho, the risk of mother-to-child-transmission (MTCT) of HIV is substantial; women of childbearing age have a high HIV prevalence rate (26·4%), low knowledge of HIV status and a total fertility rate of 3·5 births per woman. An effective means of preventing MTCT is to reduce unwanted fertility. This paper examines the unmet need for contraception to limit and space births among HIV-positive women in Lesotho aged 15–49 years, using the 2004 Lesotho Demographic and Health Survey. HIV-positive (...)
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  30. Arline T. Geronimus, Margaret T. Hicken, Jay A. Pearson, Sarah J. Seashols, Kelly L. Brown & Tracey Dawson Cruz (2010). Do US Black Women Experience Stress-Related Accelerated Biological Aging? Human Nature 21 (1):19-38.score: 45.0
    We hypothesize that black women experience accelerated biological aging in response to repeated or prolonged adaptation to subjective and objective stressors. Drawing on stress physiology and ethnographic, social science, and public health literature, we lay out the rationale for this hypothesis. We also perform a first population-based test of its plausibility, focusing on telomere length, a biomeasure of aging that may be shortened by stressors. Analyzing data from the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN), (...)
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  31. Ina Wagner (1993). Women's Voice: The Case of Nursing Information Systems. [REVIEW] AI and Society 7 (4):295-310.score: 45.0
    This paper looks at the cultural transformation of nursing. It argues that introducing computers in a female occupation is not simply a case of imposing ‘male’ technology on ‘female’ care-oriented practices and values. In order to understand current changes of nursing practice, three points of view have to be simultaneously kept in focus: 1) the differences between women's interests and ambitions; 2) the readings of a technology that have already been established through previous examples of design and use (in (...)
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  32. Rima D. Apple & Michele S. Kohler (1994). Women Health and Medicine in America. A Historical Handbook. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 16 (2):355.score: 42.0
     
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  33. Mary Dolman & Jonathan Chase (1996). Comparison Between the Health Belief Model and Subjective Expected Utility Theory: Predicting Incontinence Prevention Behaviour in Postpartum Women. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 2 (3):217-222.score: 42.0
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  34. Ughetta Vergari (2011). From Bioethics to Biopolitics: Contemporary Issues and New Challenges in Women Health. International Journal of Ethics 7 (2).score: 42.0
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  35. G. Yudkin (1986). Women, Health and Healing -- Toward a New Perspective. Journal of Medical Ethics 12 (2):96-96.score: 42.0
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  36. Verónica de León, Blanca Pelcastre & Agustín Díaz (2000). Mujeres y Salud. Una Metodología Para Su Estudio. Cinta de Moebio 9.score: 40.0
    The present paper intent to support the usefulness of some theoretical-methodological qualitative perspectives for the study of women?s health studies. This is a contribution to women?s function recognition in health systems as traditional health providers, communitary organizers and an invaluable ..
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  37. Maya J. Goldenberg (2010). Working for the Cure: Challenging Pink Ribbon Activism [Book Chapter]. In Roma Harris, Nadine Wathen & Sally Wyatt (eds.), [Book] Configuring Health Consumers: Health Work and the Imperative of Personal Responsibility. Eds. R. Harris, N. Wathen, S. Wyatt. Amsterdam: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 39.0
    In accordance with the critical women’s health literature recounting the ways that women are encouraged to submit themselves to various sorts of health “imperatives”, I investigate the messages tacitly conveyed to women in “campaigns for the cure” and breast cancer awareness efforts, which, I argue, overemphasizes a “positive attitude”, healthy lifestyle, and cure rather than prevention of this life-threatening disease. I challenge that the message of hope pervading breast cancer discourse silences the despair felt by (...)
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  38. Evelyn L. Barbee & Marilyn Little (1993). Health, Social Class and African-American Women. In Stanlie M. James & Abena P. A. Busia (eds.), Theorizing Black Feminisms: The Visionary Pragmatism of Black Women. Routledge. 182--99.score: 39.0
     
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  39. Susan Feldman & Rosie Beaumont (2000). The Impact of Widowhood on Older Women's Health and Well-Being. In Lorraine Dennerstein & Margret M. Baltes (eds.), Women's Rights and Bioethics. Unesco. 142.score: 39.0
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  40. Lucy Frith (1997). Book Review: Women and Health Care Industry: An Unhealthy Relationship? Peggy Foster, 1995, Open University Press, 224 Pages, £45.00 Hardback, £13.99 Paperback, ISBN 0-335-09472-4 (Paperback). [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 5 (2):171-172.score: 39.0
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  41. Nina Nikku (1999). Recension Av" The Politics of Women's Health. Exploring Agency and Autonomy". Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (1):65-66.score: 39.0
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  42. Kathryn Paxton George (1994). Discrimination and Bias in the Vegan Ideal. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 7 (1):19-28.score: 36.0
    The vegan ideal is entailed by arguments for ethical veganism based on traditional moral theory (rights and/or utilitarianism) extended to animals. The most ideal lifestyle would abjure the use of animals or their products for food since animals suffer and have rights not to be killed. The ideal is discriminatory because the arguments presuppose a male physiological norm that gives a privileged position to adult, middle-class males living in industrialized countries. Women, children, the aged, and others have substantially different (...)
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  43. Carolyn McLeod (2010). Harm or Mere Inconvenience? Denying Women Emergency Contraception. Hypatia 25 (1):11-30.score: 36.0
    This paper addresses the likely impact on women of being denied emergency contraception (EC) by pharmacists who conscientiously refuse to provide it. A common view—defended by Elizabeth Fenton and Loren Lomasky, among others—is that these refusals inconvenience rather than harm women so long as the women can easily get EC somewhere else nearby. I argue from a feminist perspective that the refusals harm women even when they can easily get EC somewhere else nearby.
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  44. Carol Isaacson Barash (1996). Review Essay : Ruth Hubbard, Profitable Promises: Essays on Women, Science and Health (Monroe, Me, Common Courage Press, 1995). Philosophy and Social Criticism 22 (3):113-118.score: 36.0
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  45. Ronald J. Burke (2002). Work Stress and Women's Health: Occupational Status Effects. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 37 (1):91 - 102.score: 36.0
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  46. Florencia Luna & Sheryl Vanderpoel (2013). Not the Usual Suspects: Addressing Layers of Vulnerability. Bioethics 27 (6):325-332.score: 36.0
    This paper challenges the traditional account of vulnerability in healthcare which conceptualizes vulnerability as a list of identifiable subpopulations. This list of ‘usual suspects’, focusing on groups from lower resource settings, is a narrow account of vulnerability. In this article we argue that in certain circumstances middle-class individuals can be also rendered vulnerable. We propose a relational and layered account of vulnerability and explore this concept using the case study of cord blood (CB) banking. In the first section, two different (...)
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  47. Rosemarie Tong (2001). Just Caring About Women's and Children's Health: Some Feminist Perspectives. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (2):147 – 162.score: 36.0
  48. Sirkku Kristiina Hellsten (2000). Women's Rights and Reproductive Health Care in a Global Perspective. Journal of Social Philosophy 31 (4):382–390.score: 36.0
  49. Kristen Hessler (2013). Hard Cases: Philosophy, Public Health, and Women's Human Rights. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 47 (4):375-390.score: 36.0
  50. Wendy Rogers (2004). Evidence-Based Medicine and Women: Do the Principles and Practice of EBM Further Women's Health? Bioethics 18 (1):50-71.score: 36.0
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