Search results for 'Women History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  6
    Fernanda Henriques (2013). The Need for an Alternative Narrative to the History of Ideas or To Pay a Debt to Women: A Feminist Approach to Ricœur's Thought. Études Ricoeuriennes / Ricoeur Studies 4 (1):7-20.
    This paper explores the thought of Paul Ricœur from a feminist point of view. My goal is to show that it is necessary to narrate differently the history of our culture – in particular, the history of philosophy – in order for wommen to attain a self-representation that is equal to that of men. I seek to show that Ricoeur’s philosophy – especially his approach to the topics of memory and history, on the one hand, and the (...)
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  2.  76
    Sarah Tyson (2013). Reclamation From Absence? Luce Irigaray and Women in the History of Philosophy. Hypatia 28 (3):483-498.
    Luce Irigaray 's work does not present an obvious resource for projects seeking to reclaim women in the history of philosophy. Indeed, many authors introduce their reclamation project with an argument against conceptions, attributed to Irigaray or “French feminists” more generally, that the feminine is the excluded other of discourse. These authors claim that if the feminine is the excluded other of (...)
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  3. R. D. R. D. (1985). Women, History and Theory. The Essays of Joan Kelly. By Joan Kelly. [REVIEW] History and Theory 24 (3):352.
     
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  4. Jane Lewis (1989). Women, History and Theory. History of European Ideas 10 (5):619-619.
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  5.  24
    Virginia Held (1986). Book Review:The Man of Reason: "Male" and "Female" in Western Philosophy. Genevieve Lloyd; Women, History, and Theory: The Essays of Joan Kelly. Joan Kelly; Women's Views of the Political World of Men. Judith Hicks Stiehm. [REVIEW] Ethics 96 (3):652-.
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  6.  1
    Emily Grosholz (1987). Women, History and Practical Deliberation. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 1 (3):218 - 226.
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  7.  2
    Marie Lathers (2009). " No Official Requirement": Women, History, Time, and the US Space Program. Feminist Studies 35 (1):14-40.
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  8.  3
    Sally Waite (2009). The Herculaneum Women (J.) Daehner (Ed.) The Herculaneum Women. History, Context, Identities. Pp. Xiv + 178, B/W & Colour Ills, B/W & Colour Pls. Los Angeles: Getty Publications, 2007. Cased, £32.50, US$50. ISBN: 978-0-89236-882-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (02):592-.
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  9. Karen Green (2014). A History of Women's Political Thought in Europe. 1700-1800. Cambridge.
    During the eighteenth century, elite women participated in the philosophical, scientific, and political controversies that resulted in the overthrow of monarchy, the reconceptualisation of marriage, and the emergence of modern, democratic institutions. In this comprehensive study, Karen Green outlines and discusses the ideas and arguments of these women, exploring the development of their distinctive and contrasting political positions, and their engagement with the works of political thinkers such as Hobbes, Locke, Mandeville and Rousseau. Her exploration ranges across Europe (...)
     
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  10.  4
    Jacqueline Broad & Karen Green (2009). A History of Women's Political Thought in Europe, 1400-1700. Cambridge University Press.
    This ground-breaking book surveys the history of women's political thought in Europe from the late medieval period to the early modern era. The authors examine women's ideas about topics such as the basis of political authority, the best form of political organisation, justifications of obedience and resistance, and concepts of liberty, toleration, sociability, equality, and self-preservation. Women's ideas concerning relations between the sexes are discussed in tandem with their broader political outlooks; and the authors demonstrate that (...)
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  11. Therese Boos Dykeman, Eve Browning, Judith Chelius Stark, Jane Duran, Marilyn Fischer, Lois Frankel, Edward Fullbrook, Jo Ellen Jacobs, Vicki Harper, Joy Laine, Kate Lindemann, Elizabeth Minnich, Andrea Nye, Margaret Simons, Audun Solli, Catherine Villanueva Gardner, Mary Ellen Waithe, Karen J. Warren & Henry West (eds.) (2008). An Unconventional History of Western Philosophy: Conversations Between Men and Women Philosophers. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This is a unique, groundbreaking study in the history of philosophy, combining leading men and women philosophers across 2600 years of Western philosophy, covering key foundational topics, including epistemology, metaphysics, and ethics. Introductory essays, primary source readings, and commentaries comprise each chapter to offer a rich and accessible introduction to and evaluation of these vital philosophical contributions. A helpful appendix canvasses an extraordinary number of women philosophers throughout history for further discovery and study.
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  12.  5
    Mary Anne Warren (1989). Review: Feminist Archeology: Uncovering Women's Philosophical History. [REVIEW] Hypatia 4 (1):155-159.
    A History of Women Philosophers, Volume I: Ancient Women Philoophers, 600 B.C. - 500 A.D., edited by Mary Ellen Waithe, is an important but somewhat frustrating book. It is filled with tantalizing glimpses into the lives and thoughts of some of our earliest philosophical foremothers. Yet it lacks a clear unifying theme, and the abrupt transitions from one philosopher and period to the next are sometimes disconcerting. The overall effect is not unlike that of viewing an expansive (...)
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  13.  4
    Linda Lopez Mcalister (1989). Some Remarks on Exploring the History of Women in Philosophy. Hypatia 4 (1):1-5.
    A discussion of the status of work on the history of women in philosophy and an introduction to the special issue of HYPATIA on the history of women in philosophy.
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  14.  13
    Sarah Tyson (2013). Reclamation From Absence? Luce Irigaray and Women in the History of Philosophy. Hypatia 28 (3):483-498.
    Luce Irigaray's work does not present an obvious resource for projects seeking to reclaim women in the history of philosophy. Indeed, many authors introduce their reclamation project with an argument against conceptions, attributed to Irigaray or “French feminists” more generally, that the feminine is the excluded other of discourse. These authors claim that if the feminine is the excluded other of discourse, then we must conclude that even if women have written philosophy they have not given voice (...)
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  15.  5
    Sara Alpern (1990). Eating Disorders Among Women: An Historical Review of the Literature From a Women's History Perspective. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 7 (3-4):47-55.
    Within a relatively brief period of time, there has been a veritable outpouring of research on anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. This article presents a concise overview of some of the major works on these eating disorders from a variety of disciplines including biomedicine, psychology, sociology, and history. The article establishes a general context of Americans' preoccupation with food and diet. However, since the majority of those suffering from anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are female, this article places these (...)
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  16. Mary Ellen Waithe (1989). A History of Women Philosophers, Volume 1: Ancient Women Philosophers, 600 B.C. - 500 A.D. Hypatia 4 (1):155-159.
    A History of Women Philosophers, Volume I: Ancient Women Philoophers, 600 B.C. - 500 A.D., edited by Mary Ellen Waithe, is an important but somewhat frustrating book. It is filled with tantalizing glimpses into the lives and thoughts of some of our earliest philosophical foremothers. Yet it lacks a clear unifying theme, and the abrupt transitions from one philosopher and period to the next are sometimes disconcerting. The overall effect is not unlike that of viewing an expansive (...)
     
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  17.  1
    Nina Baym (1991). Between Enlightenment and Victorian: Toward a Narrative of American Women Writers Writing History. Critical Inquiry 18 (1):22-41.
    All the early advocates of women’s education, male and female, had proposed history as a central subject in women’s education—perhaps as the central subject. They envisaged it as a substitute for novel reading, which they viewed as strengthening women’s mental weakness and encouraging them in unrepublican habits of idleness, extravagance, and daydreaming.6 Many prominent women educators wrote history, among them Pierce, Rowson, and Willard. But besides such history writing and history advocacy by (...)
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  18. Amy L. Bonnette, Lise van Boxel, Catherine Connors, Eve Grace, Heather King, Paul Ludwig, Clifford Orwin, Kathrin H. Rosenfield, Dana Jalbert Stauffer & Diana J. Schaub (2010). The Pious Sex: Essays on Women and Religion in the History of Political Thought. Lexington Books.
    This collection of original essays examines the relationship between women and religion in the history of political thought broadly conceived. This theme is a remarkably revealing lens through which to view the Western philosophical and poetical traditions that have culminated in secular and egalitarian modern society. The essays also give highly analytical accounts of the manifold and intricate relationships between religion, family and public life in the history of political thought, and the various ways in which these (...)
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  19. Jacqueline Broad & Karen Green (2009). A History of Women's Political Thought in Europe, 1400–1700. Cambridge University Press.
    This ground-breaking book surveys the history of women's political thought in Europe from the late medieval period to the early modern era. The authors examine women's ideas about topics such as the basis of political authority, the best form of political organisation, justifications of obedience and resistance, and concepts of liberty, toleration, sociability, equality, and self-preservation. Women's ideas concerning relations between the sexes are discussed in tandem with their broader political outlooks; and the authors demonstrate that (...)
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  20. Jacqueline Broad & Karen Green (2014). A History of Women's Political Thought in Europe, 1400–1700. Cambridge University Press.
    This ground-breaking book surveys the history of women's political thought in Europe from the late medieval period to the early modern era. The authors examine women's ideas about topics such as the basis of political authority, the best form of political organisation, justifications of obedience and resistance, and concepts of liberty, toleration, sociability, equality, and self-preservation. Women's ideas concerning relations between the sexes are discussed in tandem with their broader political outlooks; and the authors demonstrate that (...)
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  21. Rodrigo Grassi-Oliveira, Carlos Falcão de Azevedo Gomes & Lilian Milnitsky Stein (2011). False Recognition in Women with a History of Childhood Emotional Neglect and Diagnose of Recurrent Major Depression. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1127-1134.
    While previous research has suggested that adults with a history of childhood sexual abuse may be more prone to produce false memories, little is known about the consequences of childhood neglect on basic memory processes. For this reason, the authors investigated how a group of women with a history of childhood emotional neglect and diagnosed with recurrent Major Depressive Disorder performed on the Deese–Roediger–McDermott paradigm in comparison to control groups. The results indicated that women with MDD (...)
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  22. Karen Green (2014). A History of Women's Political Thought in Europe, 1700–1800. Cambridge University Press.
    During the eighteenth century, elite women participated in the philosophical, scientific, and political controversies that resulted in the overthrow of monarchy, the reconceptualisation of marriage, and the emergence of modern, democratic institutions. In this comprehensive study, Karen Green outlines and discusses the ideas and arguments of these women, exploring the development of their distinctive and contrasting political positions, and their engagement with the works of political thinkers such as Hobbes, Locke, Mandeville and Rousseau. Her exploration ranges across Europe (...)
     
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  23. Andrea Radasanu (ed.) (2010). The Pious Sex: Essays on Women and Religion in the History of Political Thought. Lexington Books.
    This collection of original essays examines the relationship between women and religion in the history of political thought broadly conceived. This theme is a remarkably revealing lens through which to view the Western philosophical and poetical traditions that have culminated in secular and egalitarian modern society. The essays also give highly analytical accounts of the manifold and intricate relationships between religion, family and public life in the history of political thought, and the various ways in which these (...)
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  24. Christine Mason Sutherland (1999). Women in the History of Rhetoric: The Past and the Future. In Christine Mason Sutherland & Rebecca Sutcliffe (eds.), The Changing Tradition: Women in the History of Rhetoric. University of Calgary Press
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  25. Karen J. Warren (ed.) (2009). An Unconventional History of Western Philosophy: Conversations Between Men and Women Philosophers. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This is a unique, groundbreaking study in the history of philosophy, combining leading men and women philosophers across 2600 years of Western philosophy, covering key foundational topics, including epistemology, metaphysics, and ethics. Introductory essays, primary source readings, and commentaries comprise each chapter to offer a rich and accessible introduction to and evaluation of these vital philosophical contributions. A helpful appendix canvasses an extraordinary number of women philosophers throughout history for further discovery and study.
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  26. Arlene W. Saxonhouse (1985). Women in the History of Political Thought Ancient Greece to Machiavelli. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  27. Gilles Ménage & Beatrice H. Zedler (1984). The History of Women Philosophers. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  28. Lorrayne Y. Baird-Lange, Thomas A. Copeland & Hildegard Schnuttgen (1989). Women in History, Literature, and the Arts a Festschrift for Hildegard Schnuttgen in Honor of Her Thirty Years of Outstanding Service at Youngstown State University. Youngstown State University.
  29.  4
    L. D. Derksen (1996). Dialogues on Women: Images of Women in the History of Philosophy. Vu University Press.
  30. Penelope Deutscher (2000). "Imperfect Discretion": Interventions Into the History of Philosophy by Twentieth-Century French Women Philosophers. Hypatia 15 (2):160-180.
    : How might we locate originality as emerging from within the "discrete" work of commentary? Because many women have engaged with philosophy in forms (including commentary) that preclude their work from being seen as properly "original," this question is a feminist issue. Via the work of selected contemporary French women philosophers, the author shows how commentary can reconfigure the philosophical tradition in innovative ways, as well as in ways that change what counts as philosophical innovation.
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  31.  10
    Caroline Winterer (2007). Is There an Intellectual History of Early American Women? Modern Intellectual History 4 (1):173-190.
  32. Judith Surkis (2006). EDUCATION Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 1993-2001 Ph. D. In History and Certificate in Women's Studies, 2001 Dissertation:“Secularization and Sexuality in Third Republic France, 1870-1920”(Dominick LaCapra, Advisor) Brown University, Providence, RI, 1988-1992. [REVIEW] Modern Intellectual History 3 (2):315-322.
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  33.  46
    Joan Gibson (2006). The Logic of Chastity: Women, Sex, and the History of Philosophy in the Early Modern Period. Hypatia 21 (4):1-19.
    : Before women could become visible as philosophers, they had first to become visible as rational autonomous thinkers. A social and ethical position holding that chastity was the most important virtue for women, and that rationality and chastity were incompatible, was a significant impediment to accepting women's capacity for philosophical thought. Thus one of the first tasks for women was to confront this belief and argue for their rationality in the face of a self-referential dilemma.
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  34.  9
    Henk de Berg, Duncan Large & Jennifer Ebbeler (2013). Alligor, Catherine. Dolley Madison: The Problem of National Unity. Lives of American Women. Series Editor, Carol Berkin. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 2013. Pp. Xv+ 175. Paper, $23.00. Baldwin, Thomas, Editor. The Cambridge History of Philosophy 1870–1945. Cambridge-New York: Cam-Bridge University Press, 2012. Pp. Xiii+ 959. Paper, $60.95. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (2):327-330.
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  35.  3
    Nancy C. Lee (2013). Lamentations and Polemic: The Rejection/Reception History of Women's Lament . . . And Syria. Interpretation 67 (2):155-183.
    This essay examines the socio-political and spiritual importance of the Book of Lamentations and lament expressions in Hebraic and early Christian liturgies and public settings, especially with regard to women’s lyrical expressions and to Syrian traditions until late antiquity. Further, this study addresses the current crisis in Syria, locating Syrian women’s and men’s laments today, including those from Muslim background. These laments show both continuity with ancient lament traditions and creative lyrical innovations that speak to the Syrian people’s (...)
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  36.  5
    Hanne Andersen (2013). Women in the History of Philosophy of Science: What We Do and Do Not Know. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 3 (1):136-139.
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  37.  9
    Brigitte H. E. Niestroj (1994). Women as Mothers and the Making of the European Mind: A Contribution to the History of Developmental Psychology and Primary Socialization. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 24 (3):281–303.
    A major purpose of this essay is to show that our assumptions regarding human development in general, and in particular, the mother and child have their roots in a Christian-humanistic tradition. I also wish to locate the origins of the discourse on the mother and child within a critical historical review of notions of a changing anthropology of the human subject. The working hypothesis is as follows: A changing view of the human being is associated with a changing approach to (...)
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  38.  3
    Cai du FangqinYiping (2012). Localizing the Study of Women's History in China. Chinese Studies in History 45 (4):7-23.
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  39.  1
    Q. Edward Wang (2012). Women's History in China. Chinese Studies in History 45 (4):3-6.
  40.  2
    Laura S. Strumingher (1987). The Vésuviennes: Images of Women Warriors in 1848 and Their Significance for French History. History of European Ideas 8 (4-5):451-488.
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  41.  1
    Liu Wenming (2012). The Rise of a "New Women's History" in Mainland China. Chinese Studies in History 45 (4):71-89.
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  42.  1
    Paul Bowles (1990). Millar and Engels on the History of Women and the Family. History of European Ideas 12 (5):595-610.
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  43.  1
    Rachel McNicholl (1989). Women in Revolution 1848/49: History and Fictional Representation in Literary Texts by German Women Writers. History of European Ideas 11 (1-6):225-233.
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  44. C. Faure (1992). Did the Constituents of 1789 Wish to Exclude Women From Political Life+ French Revolutionary History. History of European Ideas 15 (4-6):537-542.
     
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  45. Paola Govoni (2000). Women in the History of Science Discuss Biography at Newnham College. NTM International Journal of History and Ethics of Natural Sciences, Technology and Medicine 8 (1):120-122.
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  46. Patricia Phillips & Michele S. Kohler (1994). The Scientific Lady. A Social History of Women's Scientific Interests 1520-1918. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 16 (2):355.
  47. Michael Shortland (1986). A History of Women's Bodies by Edward Shorter; The Body and Society by Bryan S. Turner; Michel Foucault by Mark Cousins and Athar Hussain. History of Science 24:303-326.
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  48.  99
    Teresa Berger (forthcoming). Book Review: Women and Redemption: A Theological History. [REVIEW] Interpretation 53 (2):193-195.
  49.  22
    Eileen O’Neill (1997). HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY: Disappearing Ink: Early Modern Women Philosophers and Their Fate in History. In Janet A. Kourany (ed.), Philosophy in a Feminist Voice: Critiques and Reconstructions. Princeton University Press 17-62.
  50.  56
    Eileen O'Neill (2005). Early Modern Women Philosophers and the History of Philosophy. Hypatia 20 (3):185-197.
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