Search results for 'Women History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Sarah Tyson (2013). Reclamation From Absence? Luce Irigaray and Women in the History of Philosophy. Hypatia 28 (3):483-498.score: 156.0
    Luce Irigaray's work does not present an obvious resource for projects seeking to reclaim women in the history of philosophy. Indeed, many authors introduce their reclamation project with an argument against conceptions, attributed to Irigaray or “French feminists” more generally, that the feminine is the excluded other of discourse. These authors claim that if the feminine is the excluded other of discourse, then we must conclude that even if women have written philosophy they have not given voice (...)
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  2. Fernanda Henriques (2013). The Need for an Alternative Narrative to the History of Ideas or To Pay a Debt to Women: A Feminist Approach to Ricœur's Thought. Études Ricoeuriennes / Ricoeur Studies 4 (1):7-20.score: 126.0
    This paper explores the thought of Paul Ricœur from a feminist point of view. My goal is to show that it is necessary to narrate differently the history of our culture – in particular, the history of philosophy – in order for wommen to attain a self-representation that is equal to that of men. I seek to show that Ricoeur’s philosophy – especially his approach to the topics of memory and history, on the one hand, and the (...)
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  3. Martha Saxton (2003). Being Good: Women's Moral Values in Early America. Hill and Wang.score: 102.0
    A pathbreaking new study of women and morality How do people decide what is "good" and what is "bad"? How does a society set moral guidelines -- and what happens when the behavior of various groups differs from these guidelines? Martha Saxton tackles these and other fascinating issues in Being Good , her history of the moral values prescribed for women in early America. Saxton begins by examining seventeenth-century Boston, then moves on to eighteenth-century Virginia and nineteenth-century (...)
     
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  4. Sarah Tyson (2014). From the Exclusion of Women to the Transformation of Philosophy: Reclamation and its Possibilities. Metaphilosophy 45 (1):1-19.score: 102.0
    In the mid-1980s, feminist philosophers began to turn their critical efforts toward reclaiming women in the history of philosophy who had been neglected by traditional histories and canons. There are now scores of resources treating historical women philosophers and reclaiming them for philosophical history. This article explores the four major argumentative strategies that have been used within those reclamation projects. It argues that three of the strategies unwittingly work against the reclamationist end of having women (...)
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  5. Mary Anne Warren (1989). Review: Feminist Archeology: Uncovering Women's Philosophical History. [REVIEW] Hypatia 4 (1):155 - 159.score: 96.0
    A History of Women Philosophers, Volume I: Ancient Women Philoophers, 600 B.C. - 500 A.D., edited by Mary Ellen Waithe, is an important but somewhat frustrating book. It is filled with tantalizing glimpses into the lives and thoughts of some of our earliest philosophical foremothers. Yet it lacks a clear unifying theme, and the abrupt transitions from one philosopher and period to the next are sometimes disconcerting. The overall effect is not unlike that of viewing an (...)
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  6. Sara Alpern (1990). Eating Disorders Among Women: An Historical Review of the Literature From a Women's History Perspective. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 7 (3-4):47-55.score: 96.0
    Within a relatively brief period of time, there has been a veritable outpouring of research on anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. This article presents a concise overview of some of the major works on these eating disorders from a variety of disciplines including biomedicine, psychology, sociology, and history. The article establishes a general context of Americans' preoccupation with food and diet. However, since the majority of those suffering from anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are female, this article places these (...)
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  7. Jane Lewis (1989). Women, History and Theory. History of European Ideas 10 (5):619-619.score: 96.0
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  8. Christine Mason Sutherland (1999). Women in the History of Rhetoric: The Past and the Future. In Christine Mason Sutherland & Rebecca Sutcliffe (eds.), The Changing Tradition: Women in the History of Rhetoric. University of Calgary Press.score: 96.0
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  9. Virginia Held (1986). Book Review:The Man of Reason: "Male" and "Female" in Western Philosophy. Genevieve Lloyd; Women, History, and Theory: The Essays of Joan Kelly. Joan Kelly; Women's Views of the Political World of Men. Judith Hicks Stiehm. [REVIEW] Ethics 96 (3):652-.score: 90.0
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  10. Joan E. Taylor (2003). Jewish Women Philosophers of First-Century Alexandria: Philo's "Therapeutae" Reconsidered. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
    The 'Therapeutae' were a Jewish group of ascetic philosophers who lived outside Alexandria in the middle of the first century CE. They are described in Philo's treatise De Vita Contemplativa and have often been considered in comparison with early Christians, the Essenes, and the Dead Sea Scrolls. But who were they really? This study focuses particularly on issues of history, rhetoric, women, and gender in a wide exploration of the group, and comes to new conclusions about the 'Therapeutae' (...)
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  11. Sally Waite (2009). The Herculaneum Women (J.) Daehner (Ed.) The Herculaneum Women. History, Context, Identities. Pp. Xiv + 178, B/W & Colour Ills, B/W & Colour Pls. Los Angeles: Getty Publications, 2007. Cased, £32.50, US$50. ISBN: 978-0-89236-882-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (02):592-.score: 90.0
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  12. Marie Lathers (2009). " No Official Requirement": Women, History, Time, and the US Space Program. Feminist Studies 35 (1):14-40.score: 90.0
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  13. Grace Burbano Arias (2005). Las santafereñas del XVII: Entre holandas y lágrimas. Logos 9:119-138.score: 90.0
    The women history during the Spaniard domination period in the “Nuevo Reino de Granada” has not been studied in detail, especially in the XVI and XVII centuries. This research paper deals with some predominant topics about women’s situation in the Neogranadina society in Santa Fe de Bogotá during the XVII century.
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  14. Emily Grosholz (1987). Women, History and Practical Deliberation. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 1 (3):218 - 226.score: 90.0
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  15. L. D. Derksen (1996). Dialogues on Women: Images of Women in the History of Philosophy. Vu University Press.score: 84.0
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  16. John Stuart Mill (1975). Three Essays. Oxford University Press.score: 84.0
    The three major essays collected in this volume were written in the latter half of Mill's life (1806-1873) and were quickly accepted into the canon of European political and social thought. Today, when liberty and representative government collide with other principles and when women still experience prejudice, Mill's essays reveal his sense of history, intelligence, and ardent concern for human liberty, and continue to shed light on politics and contemporary society.
     
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  17. Florence Nightingale (1992). Cassandra and Other Selections From Suggestions for Thought. New York University Press.score: 84.0
    "An impressively reasoned and startlingly unorthodox treatise on religion." - Belles Lettres Florence Nightingale (1820-1920) is famous as the heroine of the Crimean War and later as a campaigner for health care founded on a clean environment and good nursing. Though best known for her pioneering demonstration that disease rather than wounds killed most soldiers, she was also heavily allied to social reform movements and to feminist protest against the enforced idleness of middle-class women. This original edition provides bold (...)
     
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  18. Joan Gibson (2006). The Logic of Chastity: Women, Sex, and the History of Philosophy in the Early Modern Period. Hypatia 21 (4):1-19.score: 78.0
    : Before women could become visible as philosophers, they had first to become visible as rational autonomous thinkers. A social and ethical position holding that chastity was the most important virtue for women, and that rationality and chastity were incompatible, was a significant impediment to accepting women's capacity for philosophical thought. Thus one of the first tasks for women was to confront this belief and argue for their rationality in the face of a self-referential dilemma.
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  19. Elisabeth Roudinesco (2009). Our Dark Side: A History of Perversion. Polity.score: 78.0
    The sublime and the abject -- Sade pro and contra Sade -- Dark enlightenment or barbaric science -- The Auschwitz confessions -- The perverse society.
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  20. Penelope Deutscher (2000). "Imperfect Discretion": Interventions Into the History of Philosophy by Twentieth-Century French Women Philosophers. Hypatia 15 (2):160-180.score: 78.0
    : How might we locate originality as emerging from within the "discrete" work of commentary? Because many women have engaged with philosophy in forms (including commentary) that preclude their work from being seen as properly "original," this question is a feminist issue. Via the work of selected contemporary French women philosophers, the author shows how commentary can reconfigure the philosophical tradition in innovative ways, as well as in ways that change what counts as philosophical innovation.
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  21. Ida H. Stamhuis & Arve Monsen (2007). Kristine Bonnevie, Tine Tammes and Elisabeth Schiemann in Early Genetics: Emerging Chances for a University Career for Women. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 40 (3):427 - 466.score: 78.0
    The beginning of the twentieth century saw the emergence of the discipline of genetics. It is striking how many female scientists were contributing to this new field at the time. At least three female pioneers succeeded in becoming professors: Kristine Bonnevie (Norway), Elisabeth Schiemann (Germany) and the Tine Tammes (The Netherlands). The question is which factors contributed to the success of these women's careers? At the time women were gaining access to university education it had become quite the (...)
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  22. Hanne Andersen (2013). Women in the History of Philosophy of Science: What We Do and Do Not Know. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 3 (1):136-139.score: 78.0
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  23. Caroline Winterer (2007). Is There an Intellectual History of Early American Women? Modern Intellectual History 4 (1):173-190.score: 78.0
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  24. Henk de Berg, Duncan Large & Jennifer Ebbeler (2013). Alligor, Catherine. Dolley Madison: The Problem of National Unity. Lives of American Women. Series Editor, Carol Berkin. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 2013. Pp. Xv+ 175. Paper, $23.00. Baldwin, Thomas, Editor. The Cambridge History of Philosophy 1870–1945. Cambridge-New York: Cam-Bridge University Press, 2012. Pp. Xiii+ 959. Paper, $60.95. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (2):327-330.score: 78.0
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  25. Rachel McNicholl (1989). Women in Revolution 1848/49: History and Fictional Representation in Literary Texts by German Women Writers. History of European Ideas 11 (1-6):225-233.score: 78.0
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  26. Paul Bowles (1990). Millar and Engels on the History of Women and the Family. History of European Ideas 12 (5):595-610.score: 78.0
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  27. Cai du FangqinYiping (2012). Localizing the Study of Women's History in China. Chinese Studies in History 45 (4):7-23.score: 78.0
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  28. C. Faure (1992). Did the Constituents of 1789 Wish to Exclude Women From Political Life+ French Revolutionary History. History of European Ideas 15 (4-6):537-542.score: 78.0
     
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  29. Paola Govoni (2000). Women in the History of Science Discuss Biography at Newnham College. NTM International Journal of History and Ethics of Natural Sciences, Technology and Medicine 8 (1):120-122.score: 78.0
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  30. Nancy C. Lee (2013). Lamentations and Polemic: The Rejection/Reception History of Women's Lament . . . And Syria. Interpretation 67 (2):155-183.score: 78.0
    This essay examines the socio-political and spiritual importance of the Book of Lamentations and lament expressions in Hebraic and early Christian liturgies and public settings, especially with regard to women’s lyrical expressions and to Syrian traditions until late antiquity. Further, this study addresses the current crisis in Syria, locating Syrian women’s and men’s laments today, including those from Muslim background. These laments show both continuity with ancient lament traditions and creative lyrical innovations that speak to the Syrian people’s (...)
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  31. Patricia Phillips & Michele S. Kohler (1994). The Scientific Lady. A Social History of Women's Scientific Interests 1520-1918. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 16 (2):355.score: 78.0
  32. Michael Shortland (1986). A History of Women's Bodies by Edward Shorter; The Body and Society by Bryan S. Turner; Michel Foucault by Mark Cousins and Athar Hussain. History of Science 24:303-326.score: 78.0
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  33. Laura S. Strumingher (1987). The Vésuviennes: Images of Women Warriors in 1848 and Their Significance for French History. History of European Ideas 8 (4-5):451-488.score: 78.0
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  34. Judith Surkis (2006). EDUCATION Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 1993-2001 Ph. D. In History and Certificate in Women's Studies, 2001 Dissertation:“Secularization and Sexuality in Third Republic France, 1870-1920”(Dominick LaCapra, Advisor) Brown University, Providence, RI, 1988-1992. [REVIEW] Modern Intellectual History 3 (2):315-322.score: 78.0
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  35. Q. Edward Wang (2012). Women's History in China. Chinese Studies in History 45 (4):3-6.score: 78.0
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  36. Liu Wenming (2012). The Rise of a "New Women's History" in Mainland China. Chinese Studies in History 45 (4):71-89.score: 78.0
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  37. Eileen O'Neill (2005). Early Modern Women Philosophers and the History of Philosophy. Hypatia 20 (3):185-197.score: 72.0
  38. Benjamin R. Barber (1988). Spirit's Phoenix and History's Owl or the Incoherence of Dialectics in Hegel's Account of Women. Political Theory 16 (1):5-28.score: 72.0
  39. Gillian Clark (1992). 'History of Women', or 'Women's History'? Georges Duby, Michelle Perrot (edd.): Histoire desfemmes en occident, I: L'Antiquité (sous la direction de Pauline Schmitt Pantel). Pp. 590; 69 illustrations. Plon, 1991. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 42 (01):124-126.score: 72.0
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  40. Carolina Armenteros (2012). 'True Love' and Rousseau's Philosophy of History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (2):258-282.score: 72.0
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  41. Eileen O'Neill (2009). Review of Jacqueline Broad, Karen Green, A History of Women's Political Thought in Europe, 1400-1700. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (11).score: 72.0
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  42. Brigitte H. E. Niestroj (1994). Women as Mothers and the Making of the European Mind: A Contribution to the History of Developmental Psychology and Primary Socialization. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 24 (3):281–303.score: 72.0
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  43. José Brunner (2008). Liberal Laws V. The Law of Large Numbers, or How Demographic Rhetoric Arouses Anxiety (in Germany). Law and Ethics of Human Rights 2 (1):54-87.score: 72.0
    This paper presents the metaphysics of liberal rights reasoning on one hand and that of demographic reasoning on the other, as exemplifying two worldviews that both compete and complement each other in the contemporary German public debate on demographic decline. First, this essay outlines the way in which liberal theorists of various outlooks, perfectionist and neutralist alike, assume that a wide range of rights serves not only the interests of those individuals who possess them, but that it constitutes the foundations (...)
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  44. Gillian Clark (1988). Mary Ellen Waithe (Ed.): A History of Women Philosophers, Vol. 1: Ancient Women Philosophers 600 B.C.–A.D. 500. Pp. Xxiv + 229; Frontispiece; Chronological Table Pp. 2–3. Dordrecht, Boston and Lancaster: Martinus Nijhoff, 1987. £49.95. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 38 (02):429-430.score: 72.0
  45. Janet Huskinson (2005). Women and Cult Practices L. Larsson Lovén, A. Strömberg (Edd.): Gender, Cult, and Culture in the Ancient World From Mycenae to Byzantium. Proceedings of the Second Nordic Symposium on Gender and Women's History in Antiquity, Helsinki 20–22 October 2000 . (Studies in Mediterranean Archaeology and Literature Pocket-Book 166.) Pp. 168, Ill, Pls. Sävedalen: Paul Åströms Förlag, 2003. Cased, US$29.80. ISBN: 91-7018-127-X. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (01):296-.score: 72.0
  46. Martha Watson (2000). Reclaiming Rhetorica: Women in the Rhetorical Tradition, And: Listening to Their Voices: The Rhetorical Activities of Historical Women, And: The Changing Tradition: Women in the History of Rhetoric (Review). Philosophy and Rhetoric 33 (3):294-298.score: 72.0
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  47. Bret Mulligan (2008). History (R.S.) Bagnall and (R.) Cribiore Eds. Women's Letters From Ancient Egypt. 300 B.C.-A.D. 800. With Contributions by Evie Ahtaridis. Ann Arbor: U. Of Michigan P., 2006. Pp. Xiii, 421, Illus. £41. 9780472115068. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 128:231-.score: 72.0
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  48. Barbara Biesecker (1992). Coming to Terms with Recent Attempts to Write Women Into the History of Rhetoric. Philosophy and Rhetoric 25 (2):140 - 161.score: 72.0
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  49. Susan Deacy (2008). History (J.B.) Connelly Portrait of a Priestess. Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece. Princeton UP, 2007. Pp. Xv + 413. £26.95. 9780691127460. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 128:218-.score: 72.0
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