Search results for 'Women Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  5
    Rosi Braidotti (1991). Patterns of Dissonance: A Study of Women in Contemporary Philosophy. Routledge.
    This book is a brilliant and timely analysis of the complex issues raised by the relation between women and philosophy. It offers a critical account of a wide range of contemporary philosophical and feminist texts and it develops this account into an original project of critical feminist thought. Braidotti examines contemporary French philosophy as practised by men such as Foucault and Derrida, showing that they rely on a notion of 'the feminine' in order to undermine classical thought, (...)
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  2. Neven Sesardic & Rafael De Clercq (2014). Women in Philosophy: Problems with the Discrimination Hypothesis. Academic Questions 27 (4):461-473.
    A number of philosophers attribute the underrepresentation of women in philosophy largely to bias against women or some kind of wrongful discrimination. They cite six sources of evidence to support their contention: (1) gender disparities that increase along the path from undergraduate student to full time faculty member; (2) anecdotal accounts of discrimination in philosophy; (3) research on gender bias in the evaluation of manuscripts, grants, and curricula vitae in other academic disciplines; (4) psychological research on (...)
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  3.  95
    Alison Wylie (2011). Women in Philosophy: The Costs of Exclusion—Editor's Introduction. Hypatia 26 (2):374-382.
    Philosophy has the dubious distinction of attracting and retaining proportionally fewer women than any other field in the humanities, indeed, fewer than in all but the most resolutely male-dominated of the sciences. This short article introduces a thematic cluster that brings together five short essays that probe the reasons for and the effects of these patterns of exclusion, not just of women but of diverse peoples of all kinds in Philosophy. It summarizes some of the demographic (...)
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  4. George Yancy (ed.) (2010). The Center Must Not Hold: White Women Philosophers on the Whiteness of Philosophy. Lexington Books.
    In this collection, white women philosophers engage boldly in critical acts of exploring ways of naming and disrupting whiteness in terms of how it has defined the conceptual field of philosophy. Focuses on the whiteness of the epistemic and value-laden norms within philosophy itself, the text dares to identify the proverbial elephant in the room known as white supremacy and how that supremacy functions as the measure of reason, knowledge, and philosophical intelligibility.
     
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  5.  12
    Naomi Zack (ed.) (2000). Women of Color and Philosophy: A Critical Reader. Blackwell Publishers.
    Philosophy is in its fourth millennium but this collection is the first of its kind. Twelve contemporary women of color who are American academic philosophers consider the methods and subjects of the discipline from perspectives partly informed by their experiences as African American, Asian American, Latina, Mixed Race and Native American.
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  6.  58
    Alison Bailey (2005). Book Review: Naomi Zack.Women of Color and Philosophy. Malden, Mass.: Blackwell Publishers, 2000. [REVIEW] Hypatia 20 (1):220-225.
    Naomi Zack’s unique and important collection, Women of Color and Philosophy, brings together for the first time the voices of twelve philosophers who are women of color. She begins with the premise that the work of women of color who do philosophy in academe, but who do not write exclusively on issues of race, ethnicity, and gender, merits a collection of its own. It’s rare that women of color pursue philosophy in academic contexts; (...)
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  7.  8
    Sarah Tyson (2014). From the Exclusion of Women to the Transformation of Philosophy: Reclamation and its Possibilities. Metaphilosophy 45 (1):1-19.
    In the mid-1980s, feminist philosophers began to turn their critical efforts toward reclaiming women in the history of philosophy who had been neglected by traditional histories and canons. There are now scores of resources treating historical women philosophers and reclaiming them for philosophical history. This article explores the four major argumentative strategies that have been used within those reclamation projects. It argues that three of the strategies unwittingly work against the reclamationist end of having women engaged (...)
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  8. Erin C. Tarver (2013). The Dismissal of Feminist Philosophy and Hostility to Women in the Profession. APA Newsletter on Feminist Philosophy 12 (2):8-11.
  9. Carrie Figdor & Matt L. Drabek (forthcoming). Experimental Philosophy and the Underrepresentation of Women. In W. Buckwalter & J. Sytsma (eds.), A Companion to Experimental Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell
  10. Trista Selous (ed.) (2007). Hipparchia's Choice: An Essay Concerning Women, Philosophy, Etc. Cup.
    "To be a philosopher and to be a feminist are one and the same thing. A feminist is a woman who does not allow anyone to think in her place."-from _Hipparchia's Choice_ A work of rare insight and irreverence, _Hipparchia's Choice_ boldly recasts the history of philosophy from the pre-Socratics to the post-Derrideans as one of masculine texts and male problems. The position of women, therefore, is less the result of a hypothetical "femininity" and more the fault of (...)
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  11. Michele Le Doeuff (2007). Hipparchia's Choice: An Essay Concerning Women, Philosophy, Etc. Columbia University Press.
     
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  12. Ellen Kennedy & Susan Mendus (eds.) (1987). Women in Western Political Philosophy: Kant to Nietzsche. St. Martin's Press.
  13. Michèle Le Dœuff (1991). Hipparchia's Choice: An Essay Concerning Women, Philosophy, Etc. Blackwell.
  14. Molly Paxton, Carrie Figdor & Valerie Tiberius (2012). Quantifying the Gender Gap: An Empirical Study of the Underrepresentation of Women in Philosophy. Hypatia 27 (4):949-957.
    The lack of gender parity in philosophy has garnered serious attention recently. Previous empirical work that aims to quantify what has come to be called “the gender gap” in philosophy focuses mainly on the absence of women in philosophy faculty and graduate programs. Our study looks at gender representation in philosophy among undergraduate students, undergraduate majors, graduate students, and faculty. Our findings are consistent with what other studies have found about women faculty in (...), but we were able to add two pieces of new information. First, the biggest drop in the proportion of women in philosophy occurs between students enrolled in introductory philosophy classes and philosophy majors. Second, this drop is mitigated by the presence of more women philosophy faculty. (shrink)
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  15.  9
    Ok-Soong Cha (2008). The Philosophy of Women, See-al and Life of Haam, Seok Heon. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:1117-1121.
    This thesis reviews Haam Seok Heon‘s See-al philosophy, the main philosophy about life in terms of women. The See-al philosophy was created by Haam, who went through the turbulent times of Korea. So far, we have had papers that dealt with his philosophy under the political, historical and religious contexts, but there has been no paper focused on women. Actually, Haam confessed that it was his mother who structured the foundation of his philosophy. (...)
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  16. Yann Benétreau-Dupin & Guillaume Beaulac (2015). Fair Numbers: What Data Can and Cannot Tell Us About the Underrepresentation of Women in Philosophy. Ergo, an Open Access Journal of Philosophy 2 (3):59-81.
    The low representation (< 30%) of women in philosophy in English-speaking countries has generated much discussion, both in academic circles and the public sphere. It is sometimes suggested (Haslanger 2009) that unconscious biases, acting at every level in the field, may be grounded in gendered schemas of philosophers and in the discipline more widely, and that actions to make philosophy a more welcoming place for women should address such schemas. However, existing data are too limited to (...)
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  17.  6
    Ann Garry & Marilyn Pearsall (eds.) (1989). Women, Knowledge and Reality: Explorations in Feminist Philosophy. Routledge.
    This second edition of _Women, Knowledge, and Reality_ continues to exhibit the ways in which feminist philosophers enrich and challenge philosophy. Essays by twenty-five feminist philosophers, seventeen of them new to the second edition, address fundamental issues in philosophical and feminist methods, metaphysics, epistemology, and the philosophies of science, language, religion and mind/body. This second edition expands the perspectives of women of color, of postmodernism and French feminism, and focuses on the most recent controversies in feminist theory and (...)
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  18.  7
    Catherine Villanueva Gardner (2000). Rediscovering Women Philosophers: Philosophical Genre and the Boundaries of Philosophy. Westview.
    This book examines the philosophical foremothers of women’s philosophy and explores what their work may have to offer modern theorizing in feminist ethics. Through such writers as Catharine Macaulay, Mary Wollstonecraft, and George Eliot, Gardner interprets a varied selection of moral philosophers in an attempt both to contribute to our understanding of their work, and perhaps even to encourage other philosophers to interpretive work of their own. She also looks into the reasons such forms as novels, letters, and (...)
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  19.  66
    Linda Lemoncheck (1998). Loose Women, Lecherous Men: A Feminist Philosophy of Sex. Philosophical Studies 89 (2-3):369-373.
    Linda LeMoncheck introduces a new way of thinking and talking about women's sexual pleasures, preferences, and desires. Using the tools of contemporary analytic philosophy, she discusses methods for mediating the tensions among apparently irreconcilable feminist perspectives on women's sexuality and shows how a feminist epistemology and ethic can advance the dialogue in women's sexuality across a broad political spectrum. She argues that in order to capture the diversity and complexity of women's sexual experience, women's (...)
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  20.  16
    Thomas E. Wartenberg (1988). Teaching Women Philosophy. Teaching Philosophy 11 (1):15-24.
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  21.  17
    Helen E. Lees (2012). Is R.S. Peters' Way of Mentioning Women in His Texts Detrimental to Philosophy of Education? Some Considerations and Questions. Ethics and Education 7 (3):291-302.
    . Is R.S. Peters' way of mentioning women in his texts detrimental to philosophy of education? Some considerations and questions. Ethics and Education: Vol. 7, Creating spaces, pp. 291-302. doi: 10.1080/17449642.2013.767002.
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  22.  9
    Alison Bailey (2005). Women of Color and Philosophy (Review). Hypatia 20 (1):220-225.
    Book Review of Naomi Zack's Women of Color and Philosophy.
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  23.  1
    W. M. Brown & D. L. Petrosky (1984). Women, Philosophy, and Sport: A Collection of New Essays. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 11 (1):104-107.
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  24.  9
    Jan M. Boxill (1985). Women, Philosophy, and Sport. Teaching Philosophy 8 (3):244-246.
  25. Linda Martín Alcoff (ed.) (2003). Singing in the Fire Tales of Women in Philosophy. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This is a unique, groundbreaking collection of autobiographical essays by leading women in philosophy. It provides a glimpse at the experiences of the generation that witnessed, and helped create, the remarkable advances now evident for women in the field.
     
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  26.  90
    Ann Garry & Marilyn Pearsall (eds.) (1996). Women, Knowledge, and Reality: Explorations in Feminist Philosophy, 2nd Ed. Routledge.
    This second edition of Women, Knowledge and Reality continues to exhibit the ways in which feminist philosophers enrich and challenge philosophy. Essays by twenty-five feminist philosophers, seventeen of them new to the second edition, address fundamental issues in philosophical and feminist methods, metaphysics, epistemology, and the philosophies of science, language, religion and mind/body. This second edition expands the perspectives of women of color, of postmodernism and French feminism, and focuses on the most recent controversies in feminist theory (...)
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  27.  21
    Morgan Thompson, Toni Adleberg, Sam Sims & Eddy Nahmias (2016). Why Do Women Leave Philosophy? Surveying Students at the Introductory Level. Philosophers' Imprint 16 (6).
    Although recent research suggests that women are underrepresented in philosophy after initial philosophy courses, there have been relatively few empirical investigations into the factors that lead to this early drop-off in women’s representation. In this paper, we present the results of empirical investigations at a large American public university that explore various factors contributing to women’s underrepresentation in philosophy at the undergraduate level. We administered climate surveys to hundreds of students completing their Introduction to (...)
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  28.  10
    Anna Leuschner (2015). Katrina Hutchison and Fiona Jenkins : Women in Philosophy: What Needs to Change? Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 46 (1):245-249.
    The current situation of women in philosophy is not rosy at all. There are a raising number of complaints from female philosophers about their working situation, about getting harassed, discouraged, isolated, or simply ignored. Numerous anecdotes are posted in online forums and weblogs, such as beingawomaninphilosophy.wordpress.com/or feministphilosophers.wordpress.com/. Apart from that, one can simply observe that much more men than women are employed in philosophical departments, give talks at philosophical conferences, and have articles published in philosophical journals. Katrina (...)
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  29. Katrina Hutchison & Fiona Jenkins (eds.) (2013). Women in Philosophy: What Needs to Change? OUP USA.
    Why are professional philosophers today still overwhelmingly male? Often it is assumed that women need to change to fit existing institutions. This book instead offers concrete reflections on the way in which philosophy needs to change to benefit from the important contribution women's full participation makes to the discipline.
     
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  30.  24
    Dg Brown (1998). 2 Inari Thiel,'On Stove on Mill on Women', Philosophy, Lxix (1994), 100-101. 3 F. Gerald Downing,'A Cynical Response to the Subjection of Women', Philosophy, Box (1994), 229-30. 4 References to Mill Are to the Volume and Page of the Collected Works of John Stuart Mill, Ed. John Robson, Toronto, 1963-1991. [REVIEW] Utilitas 10 (1).
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  31.  12
    Nanette Funk & Andrew Wengraf (1998). Honoring Gertrude Ezorsky: The Society for Women in Philosophy's 1997 Distinguished Woman Professor. Radical Philosophy Review 1 (2):126-132.
    The paper included here was presented by Nanette Funk in Honor of Gertrude Ezorsky, the famed philosopher, feminist, and antiracism activist, at the 1997 Meeting of the Society for Women in Philosophy. It is published here as presented. Thus, although it is a coauthored talk the “I” refers to Nanette Funk.
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  32.  4
    Michèle Le Dœuff (1987). Ants and Women, or Philosophy Without Borders. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 21:41-54.
    Some months ago, when giving a paper about Sir Francis Bacon's philosophy, I mentioned that, according to him, Nature was a woman; true knowledge treats her like his legitimate wife, while false knowledge deals with her as if she were a barren prostitute. In the same paper, I also mentioned that according again to Bacon, there are three kinds of intellectual attitudes, or three kinds of philosophers, namely the pure rationalists, who are like spiders, the empiricists who are like (...)
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  33.  5
    Peter Anstey & Jocelyn Harris (2012). Introduction: Women, Philosophy and Literature in the Early Modern Period. Intellectual History Review 22 (3):323-325.
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  34.  9
    S. E. Marshall (1993). Hipparchia's Choice. An Essay Concerning Women, Philosophy, Etc. Philosophical Books 34 (1):53-55.
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  35.  5
    Carolyn Korsmeyer (2010). Women, Philosophy, and Literature. By JANE DURAN. Hypatia 25 (2):476-479.
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  36.  1
    Marguerite La Caze (2009). Hipparchia's Choice: An Essay Concerning Women, Philosophy, Etc. 2nd Ed. By Michèle le Dœuff. Translated by Trista Selous. [REVIEW] Hypatia 24 (1):191-195.
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  37. Alison Ainley (1993). Michèle Le Doeuff, "Hipparchia's Choice, An Essay Concerning Women, Philosophy, Etc.". International Journal of Philosophical Studies:137.
  38. Peter Beilharz (1984). Reviews : Michael Lowy, The Politics of Combined and Uneven Development, (Verso, 1981) and Raya Dunayevska, Rosa Luxemburg, Women's Liberation and Marx's Philosophy of Revolution (Humanities, 1982). [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 8 (1):151-153.
    Michael Lowy, The Politics of Combined and Uneven Development, and Raya Dunayevska, Rosa Luxemburg, Women's Liberation and Marx's Philosophy of Revolution.
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  39. Louise Antony (2012). Different Voices or Perfect Storm: Why Are There So Few Women in Philosophy? Journal of Social Philosophy 43 (3):227-255.
  40. Rosi Braidotti (2013). Patterns of Dissonance: A Study of Women and Contemporary Philosophy. Polity.
    This book is a brilliant and timely analysis of the complex issues raised by the relation between women and philosophy. It offers a critical account of a wide range of contemporary philosophical and feminist texts and it develops this account into an original project of critical feminist thought. Braidotti examines contemporary French philosophy as practised by men such as Foucault and Derrida, showing that they rely on a notion of 'the feminine' in order to undermine classical thought, (...)
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  41. Penelope Deutscher (2000). "Imperfect Discretion": Interventions Into the History of Philosophy by Twentieth-Century French Women Philosophers. Hypatia 15 (2):160-180.
    : How might we locate originality as emerging from within the "discrete" work of commentary? Because many women have engaged with philosophy in forms (including commentary) that preclude their work from being seen as properly "original," this question is a feminist issue. Via the work of selected contemporary French women philosophers, the author shows how commentary can reconfigure the philosophical tradition in innovative ways, as well as in ways that change what counts as philosophical innovation.
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  42.  7
    Marilyn Friedman (2013). Women in Philosophy. In Katrina Hutchison & Fiona Jenkins (eds.), Women in Philosophy: What Needs to Change? OUP Usa 21.
  43.  3
    Geoffrey S. Holtzman (2016). Rejecting Beliefs, or Rejecting Believers? On the Importance and Exclusion of Women in Philosophy. Hypatia 31 (2):293-312.
    Why has gender equality progressed so much more slowly in philosophy than in other academic disciplines? Here, I address both factual and theoretical matters relating to the causes, effects, and potential redress of the lack of women in philosophy. First, I debunk extant claims that women are more likely than men to disagree with their philosophy professors and male peers; that women are more sensitive to disagreements in the philosophy classroom than men are; (...)
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  44. Therese Boos Dykeman, Eve Browning, Judith Chelius Stark, Jane Duran, Marilyn Fischer, Lois Frankel, Edward Fullbrook, Jo Ellen Jacobs, Vicki Harper, Joy Laine, Kate Lindemann, Elizabeth Minnich, Andrea Nye, Margaret Simons, Audun Solli, Catherine Villanueva Gardner, Mary Ellen Waithe, Karen J. Warren & Henry West (eds.) (2008). An Unconventional History of Western Philosophy: Conversations Between Men and Women Philosophers. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This is a unique, groundbreaking study in the history of philosophy, combining leading men and women philosophers across 2600 years of Western philosophy, covering key foundational topics, including epistemology, metaphysics, and ethics. Introductory essays, primary source readings, and commentaries comprise each chapter to offer a rich and accessible introduction to and evaluation of these vital philosophical contributions. A helpful appendix canvasses an extraordinary number of women philosophers throughout history for further discovery and study.
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  45.  8
    Catriona Mackenzie & Cynthia Townley (2013). Women In and Out of Philosophy. In Katrina Hutchison & Fiona Jenkins (eds.), Women in Philosophy: What Needs to Change? OUP Usa 164.
  46.  39
    Marije Altorf (2011). After Cursing the Library: Iris Murdoch and the (In)Visibility of Women in Philosophy. Hypatia 26 (2):384-402.
    This article offers a critical reading of three major biographies of the British novelist and philosopher Iris Murdoch. It considers in particular how a limited concern for gender issues has hampered their portrayals of Murdoch as a creator of images and ideas. The biographies are then contrasted to a biographical sketch constructed from Murdoch's philosophical writing. The assessment of the biographies is set against the larger background of the relation between women and philosophy. In doing so, the paper (...)
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  47.  5
    Dorothy Rogers (2009). The Other Philosophy Club: America's First Academic Women Philosophers. Hypatia 24 (2):164--185.
    Recent research on women philosophers has led to more discussion of the merits of many previously forgotten women in the past several years. Yet due to the fact that a thinker’s significance and influence are historical phenomena, women remain relatively absent in “mainstream” discussions of philosophy. This paper focuses on several successful academic women in American philosophy and takes notice of how they succeeded in their own era. Special attention is given to three important (...)
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  48.  5
    Sandra Bartky, Teresa Brennan, Claudia Card, Virginia Held, Alison Jaggar, Stephanie Lewis, Uma Narayan, Martha Nussbaum, Andrea Nye, Kristin Schrader-Frechette, Ofelia Schutte & Karen Warren (2003). Singing in the Fire: Stories of Women in Philosophy. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This is a unique, groundbreaking collection of autobiographical essays by leading women in philosophy. It provides a glimpse at the experiences of the generation that witnessed, and helped create, the remarkable advances now evident for women in the field.
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  49.  8
    Linda Lopez Mcalister (1989). Some Remarks on Exploring the History of Women in Philosophy. Hypatia 4 (1):1-5.
    A discussion of the status of work on the history of women in philosophy and an introduction to the special issue of HYPATIA on the history of women in philosophy.
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  50.  54
    Yoko Arisaka, Asian Women: Invisibility, Locations, and Claims to Philosophy.
    “Asian women” is an ambiguous category; it seems to indicate a racial as well as a cultural designation. The number of articles or books on being Asian or Asian-American is on the rise in other disciplines, but in comparison to the material on black or Hispanic identities, Asians are largely missing from the field of philosophy of race. Things Asian in philosophy are generally reserved for those who study Asian philosophy or comparative philosophy, but that (...)
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