Search results for 'Women Psychology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jeanne E. Gullahorn (1979). Psychology and Women: In Transition. Distributed by Halsted Press.
     
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  2.  2
    Kristine A. Komada (1988). Psychology and Women's Studies: Epistemological Dilemma or Opportunity? Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 8 (2):40-47.
    Women used to be relegated to the periphery in psychology: most of us were not really heard as primary members of our discipline. Moreover, fundamental concepts and methods were developed by men about men, and applied to women only as an afterthought and without due process. Recently, more women are speaking straightforwardly from their experiences and are beginning to be heard with increasing respect, though change is slow. Concurrently, Women's Studies is coming to its own (...)
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  3. Agnes N. O'Connell (ed.) (2001). Models of Achievement: Reflections of Eminent Women in Psychology, Volume 3. Psychology Press.
    This outstanding book contains inspiring stories of late 20th century women who broke new ground in psychological knowledge and its applications. The lives and careers of 53 women are examined within social and historical contexts using three levels of analysis--the individual, the group, and the universal. The thoughtful autobiographies and the perceptive, integrative analyses increase understanding of the personal and professional development of these women, provide insights into their patterns of achievement, and illuminate new ways of thinking (...)
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  4.  39
    David M. Buss & Joshua Duntley (1999). The Evolutionary Psychology of Patriarchy: Women Are Not Passive Pawns in Men's Game. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):219-220.
    We applaud Campbell's cogent arguments for the evolution of female survival mechanisms but take issue with several key conceptual claims: the treatment of patriarchy; the implicit assumption that women are passive pawns in a male game of media exploitation; and the neglect of the possibility that media images exploit existing evolved psychological mechanisms rather than create them.
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  5.  9
    Brigitte H. E. Niestroj (1994). Women as Mothers and the Making of the European Mind: A Contribution to the History of Developmental Psychology and Primary Socialization. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 24 (3):281–303.
    A major purpose of this essay is to show that our assumptions regarding human development in general, and in particular, the mother and child have their roots in a Christian-humanistic tradition. I also wish to locate the origins of the discourse on the mother and child within a critical historical review of notions of a changing anthropology of the human subject. The working hypothesis is as follows: A changing view of the human being is associated with a changing approach to (...)
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  6.  4
    Denis Hill (1946). Psychology of Women. Vol. I: Girlhood. The Eugenics Review 38 (3):151.
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  7.  2
    Belinda Brooks-Grodon (2002). Suzanne M. Zeedyk, and Fiona E. Raitt, The Implicit Relation of Psychology and Law: Women and Syndrome Evidence. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 10 (2):195-197.
  8. Milton M. Berger (ed.) (1993). Women Beyond Freud: New Concepts of Feminine Psychology. Routledge.
    First published in 1994. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  9. Milton M. Berger (ed.) (2016). Women Beyond Freud: New Concepts of Feminine Psychology. Routledge.
    First published in 1994. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  10. J. S. Judge (2001). Persuasion, Feminism, and the New Psychology of Women: Anne Elliot's Constancy, Courage, and Creativity. Journal of Thought 36 (2):39-54.
     
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  11. Paula Nicolson (1992). Feminism and Academic Psychology: Towards a Psychology of Women? In Kate Campbell (ed.), Critical Feminism: Argument in the Disciplines. Open University Press 53--82.
     
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  12. Sue Wilkinson & Celia Kitzinger (eds.) (1996). Representing the Other: A Feminism & Psychology Reader. Sage Publications.
    Identifying a range of key concerns related to representation and difference, Representing the Other offers a provocative agenda for the future development of feminist theory and practice. The book's contributors, including many key international researchers in women's studies, draw on personal experiences of speaking "for" and "about" others in their research, professional practice, academic writing, or political activism. They highlight problems of representing the Other with an ethnic or cultural background different from one's own and extend discussions of "Othering" (...)
     
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  13.  3
    Idun Røseth, Per-Einar Binder & Ulrik Fredrik Malt (2013). Engulfed by an Alienated and Threatening Emotional Body: The Essential Meaning Structure of Depression in Women. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 44 (2):153-178.
    Women are twice as likely to be diagnosed with a depressive disorder as men. Before trying to explain this difference, we must first understand how women experience depression. We explore the phenomenon of depression through women’s experiences, using Giorgi’s descriptive phenomenological method. An essential meaning structure describes the development of depression: The women find themselves entrapped in a personal mission which had backfired. Motivated by shame and guilt from the past, they overinvest in work or others’ (...)
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  14. Louise Levesque-Lopman (1988). Claiming Reality: Phenomenology and Women's Experience. Rowman & Littlefield.
  15.  15
    Eva Feder Kittay & Diana T. Meyers (eds.) (1987). Women and Moral Theory. Rowman & Littlefield.
    To find more information about Rowman and Littlefield titles, please visit www.rowmanlittlefield.com.
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  16. Helga Kuhse (1997). Caring: Nurses, Women, and Ethics. Blackwell Publishers.
  17. Erica Burman (1997). Deconstructing Feminist Psychology. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  18. Iris Marion Young (2005). On Female Body Experience: "Throwing Like a Girl" and Other Essays. Oxford University Press.
    Written over a span of more than two decades, the essays by Iris Marion Young collected in this volume describe diverse aspects of women's lived body experience in modern Western societies. Drawing on the ideas of several twentieth century continental philosophers--including Simone de Beauvoir, Martin Heidegger, Luce Irigaray, Julia Kristeva, and Maurice Merleau-Ponty--Young constructs rigorous analytic categories for interpreting embodied subjectivity. The essays combine theoretical description of experience with normative evaluation of the unjust constraints on their (...)
     
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  19.  2
    Jeanne Marecek (1993). Disappearances, Silences, and Anxious Rhetoric: Gender in Abnormal Psychology Textbooks. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 13 (2):114-123.
    Argues that from a feminist perspective the history of clinical psychology reveals a troubled relationship with women. Diagnoses and treatments have at times controlled and victimized women. Over the past 25 yrs, feminist scholarship, activism, and practice have contributed to knowledge. Yet, these accomplishments may go unnoticed in the field of abnormal psychology. Besides sexism, there may be other sources of resistance. Textbooks present disorders as abstracted, medicalized entities. Within this frame of reference, everyday identities, social (...)
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  20.  16
    Allison Weir (1996). Sacrificial Logics: Feminist Theory and the Critique of Identity. Routledge.
    Contemporary feminist theory is at an impasse: the project of reformulating concepts of self and social identity is thwarted by an association between identity and oppression and victimhood. In Sacrificial Logics, Allison Weir proposes a way out of this impasse through a concept of identity which depends on accepting difference. Weir argues that the equation of identity with repression and domination links "relational" feminists like Nancy Chodorow, who equate self-identity with the repression of connection to others, and poststructuralist feminists like (...)
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  21.  98
    John Klasios (2014). The Evolutionary Psychology of Human Mating: A Response to Buller's Critique. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 47:1-11.
    In this paper, I critique arguments made by philosopher David Buller against central evolutionary-psychological explanations of human mating. Specifically, I aim to rebut his criticisms of Evolutionary Psychology regarding (1) women's long-term mating preferences for high-status men; (2) the evolutionary rationale behind men's provisioning of women; (3) men's mating preferences for young women; (4) women's adaptation for extra-pair sex; (5) the sex-differentiated evolutionary theory of human jealousy; and (6) the notion (...)
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  22.  19
    Elizabeth A. Wilson (1998). Neural Geographies: Feminism and the Microstructure of Cognition. Routledge.
    Neural Geographies draws together recent feminist and deconstructive theories, early Freudian neurology and contemporary connectionist theories of cognition. In this original work, Elizabeth A. Wilson explores the convergence between Derrida, Freud and recent cognitive theory to pursue two important issues: the nature of cognition and neurology, and the politics of feminist and critical interventions into contemporary scientific psychology. This book seeks to reorient the usual presumptions of critical studies of the sciences by addressing the divisions between the static and (...)
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  23.  8
    Jane M. Ussher (2003). The Role of Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder in the Subjectification of Women. Journal of Medical Humanities 24 (1-2):131-146.
    This paper will examine the way in which premenstrual symptomatology has been represented and regulated by psychology and psychiatry. It questions the “truths” about women's premenstrual experiences that circulate in scientific discourse, namely the fictions framed as facts that serve to regulate femininity, reproduction, and what it is to be “woman.” Hegemonic truths that define Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD) and its nosological predecessor Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) are examined to illustrate how regimes of objectified knowledge and practices of (...)
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  24.  9
    Deborah A. O'Neil, Margaret M. Hopkins & Diana Bilimoria (2008). Women's Careers at the Start of the 21st Century: Patterns and Paradoxes. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 80 (4):727 - 743.
    In this article we assess the extant literature on women's careers appearing in selected career, management and psychology journals from 1990 to the present to determine what is currently known about the state of women's careers at the dawn of the 21st century. Based on this review, we identify four patterns that cumulatively contribute to the current state of the literature on women's careers: women's careers are embedded in women's larger-life contexts, families and careers (...)
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  25.  14
    Deborah A. O’Neil, Margaret M. Hopkins & Diana Bilimoria (2008). Women's Careers at the Start of the 21st Century: Patterns and Paradoxes. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 80 (4):727 - 743.
    In this article we assess the extant literature on women’s careers appearing in selected career, management and psychology journals from 1990 to the present to determine what is currently known about the state of women’s careers at the dawn of the 21st century. Based on this review, we identify four patterns that cumulatively contribute to the current state of the literature on women’s careers: women’s careers are embedded in women’s larger-life contexts, families and careers (...)
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  26.  3
    Michael Billig (1994). Celebrating Argument Within Psychology: Dialogue, Negation, and Feminist Critique. [REVIEW] Argumentation 8 (1):49-61.
    This article explores the celebratory aspect of psychological theories. In particular, it examines the celebration of dialogue, argumentation, and negativity, which is contained within recent critical theories of psychology. This psychological approach is compared with cognitive psychology's celebration of monologue. The relations between dialogical/rhetorical psychology and feminist critiques are examined. Following Habermas, it is suggested that it is necessary to point to instances of unconstrained argumentation in order to show that the utopian elements in the celebration of (...)
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  27.  2
    Geoff Kushnick (2013). Why Do the Karo Batak Prefer Women with Big Feet? Human Nature 24 (3):268-279.
    Men may find women with small feet relative to body size more attractive because foot size reliably indexes nubility—i.e., age and parity. I collected judgments of attractiveness in response to drawings of women with varying foot sizes from a sample of 159 Karo Batak respondents from North Sumatra, Indonesia, as part of a collaborative project on foot size and attractiveness. The data revealed a contrarian preference among the Karo Batak for women with big feet. The judgments were (...)
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  28. Steven Carter (1993). He's Scared, She's Scared: Understanding the Hidden Fears That Sabotage Your Relationships. Delacorte Press.
    Available for the first time in paperback, this follow-up to the phenomenally successful Men Who Can't Love tackles the issue of commitmentphobia, that persistent obstacle to truly satisfying contemporary relationships. Authors Stephen Carter and Julia Sokol explore why modern men and women are torn between the desire for intimacy and the equally intense need for independence. Drawing on numerous interviews and real-life scenarios, and written with humor, insight, and the kind of wisdom gained by personal experience, He's Scared, She's (...)
     
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  29. Toni Adleberg, Morgan Thompson & Eddy Nahmias (2014). Do Men and Women Have Different Philosophical Intuitions? Further Data. Philosophical Psychology 28 (5):615-641.
    To address the underrepresentation of women in philosophy effectively, we must understand the causes of the early loss of women. In this paper we challenge one of the few explanations that has focused on why women might leave philosophy at early stages. Wesley Buckwalter and Stephen Stich offer some evidence that women have different intuitions than men about philosophical thought experiments. We present some concerns about their evidence and we discuss our own study, in which we (...)
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  30.  14
    Susan J. Hekman (1995). Moral Voices, Moral Selves: Carol Gilligan and Feminist Moral Theory. Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Using the work of Wittgenstein and Foucault, she outlines the parameters of a discursive morality and its implications for feminism and moral theory.
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  31. Lauren Gail Berlant (2008). The Female Complaint: The Unfinished Business of Sentimentality in American Culture. Duke University Press.
    Poor Eliza -- Pax Americana : the case of Show boat -- National brands, national body : Imitation of life -- Uncle Sam needs a wife : citizenship and denegation -- Remembering love, forgetting everything else : Now, voyager -- "It's not the tragedies that kill us, it's the messes" : femininity, formalism, and Dorothy Parker -- The compulsion to repeat femininity : Landscape for a good woman and The life and loves of a she-devil.
     
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  32. Mary Vetterling-Braggin (ed.) (1982). "Femininity," "Masculinity," and "Androgyny": A Modern Philosophical Discussion. Littlefield, Adams.
     
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  33.  15
    Patricia Greenspan (2001). Good Evolutionary Reasons: Darwinian Psychiatry and Women's Depression. Philosophical Psychology 14 (3):327 – 338.
    The language of evolutionary biology and psychology is built on concepts applicable in the first instance to individual strategic rationality but extended to the level of genetic explanation. Current discussions of mental disorders as evolutionary adaptations would apply that extended language back to the individual level, with potentially problematic moral/political implications as well as possibilities of confusion. This paper focuses on one particularly problematic area: the explanation of women's greater tendency to depression. The suggestion that there are "good (...)
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  34.  19
    Jochen Fahrenberg Marcus Cheetham (2007). Assumptions About Human Nature and the Impact of Philosophical Concepts on Professional Issues: A Questionnaire-Based Study with 800 Students From Psychology, Philosophy, and Science. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (3):pp. 183-201.
    Philosophical anthropology is concerned with assumptions about human nature, differential psychology with the empirical investigation of such belief systems. A questionnaire composed of 64 questions concerning brain and consciousness, free will, evolution, meaning of life, belief in God, and theodicy problem was used to gather data from 563 students of psychology at seven universities and from 233 students enrolled in philosophy or the natural sciences. Essential concepts were monism–dualism–complementarity, atheism–agnosticism–deism–theism, attitude toward transcendence–immanence, and self-ratings of religiosity and interest (...)
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  35.  13
    Cynthia Burack (2004). Healing Identities: Black Feminist Thought and the Politics of Groups. Cornell University Press.
    Psychoanalysis, race, and racism -- From psychoanalysis to political theory -- Reparative group leadership -- Conflict and authenticity -- Bonding and solidarity -- Coalitions and reparative politics.
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  36. Jackie Hayden (2007). A Man in a Woman's World. Killynon House Books.
     
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  37.  24
    Faye E. Thompson (2003). Mothers and Midwives: The Ethical Journey. Books for Midwives.
    Faye Thompson believes there is and draws upon personal narratives from both mothers and midwives to support this belief.
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  38. Wei Xiao (2007). Zai Tai Yang Zhao Bu Dao de di Fang Xing Zou =. Jiu Zhou Chu Ban She.
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  39.  24
    Wesley Buckwalter & John Turri (forthcoming). Perceived Weaknesses of Philosophical Inquiry: A Comparison to Psychology. Philosophia:1-20.
    We report two experiments exploring the perception of how contemporary philosophy is often conducted. We find that (1) participants associate philosophy with the practice of conducting thought experiments and collating intuitions about them, and (2) that this form of inquiry is viewed much less favourably than the typical form of inquiry in psychology: research conducted by teams using controlled experiments and observation. We also found (3) an effect whereby relying on intuition is viewed more favorably in the context of (...)
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  40.  13
    Lisa Tessman (2005). Burdened Virtues: Virtue Ethics for Liberatory Struggles. Oxford University Press.
    Lisa Tessman's Burdened Virtues is a deeply original and provocative work that engages questions central to feminist theory and practice, from the perspective of Aristotelian ethics. Focused primarily on selves who endure and resist oppression, she addresses the ways in which devastating conditions confronted by these selves both limit and burden their moral goodness, and affect their possibilities of flourishing. She describes two different forms of "moral trouble" prevalent under oppression. The first is that the oppressed self may be (...)
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  41.  66
    Rachel Mckinnon (2014). Stereotype Threat and Attributional Ambiguity for Trans Women. Hypatia 29 (1):857-872.
    In this paper I discuss the interrelated topics of stereotype threat and attributional ambiguity as they relate to gender and gender identity. The former has become an emerging topic in feminist philosophy and has spawned a tremendous amount of research in social psychology and elsewhere. But the discussion, at least in how it connects to gender, is incomplete: the focus is only on cisgender women and their experiences. By considering trans women's experiences of stereotype threat and attributional (...)
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  42. Carole J. Lee (forthcoming). Revisiting Current Causes of Women's Underrepresentation in Science. In Jennifer Saul Michael Brownstein (ed.), Implicit Bias and Philosophy Volume 1: Metaphysics and Epistemology. Oxford University Press
    On the surface, developing a social psychology of science seems compelling as a way to understand how individual social cognition – in aggregate – contributes towards individual and group behavior within scientific communities (Kitcher, 2002). However, in cases where the functional input-output profile of psychological processes cannot be mapped directly onto the observed behavior of working scientists, it becomes clear that the relationship between psychological claims and normative philosophy of science should be refined. For example, a robust body of (...)
     
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  43. Don Browning (2003). Feminism, Family, and Women's Rights: A Hermeneutic Realist Perspective. Zygon 38 (2):317-332.
    In this article I apply the insights of hermeneutic realism to a practical-theological ethics that addresses the international crisis of families and women’s rights. Hermeneutic realism affirms the hermeneutic philosophy of Hans-Georg Gadamer but enriches it with the dialectic of participation and distanciation developed by Paul Ricoeur. This approach finds a place for sciences such as evolutionary psychology within a hermeneutically informed ethic. It also points to a multidimensional model of practical reason that views it as implicitly or (...)
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  44.  25
    Erich Fromm (1947/1990). Man for Himself: An Inquiry Into the Psychology of Ethics. H. Holt.
    In Man for Himself , Erich Fromm examines the confusion of modern women and men who, because they lack faith in any principle by which life ought to be guided, become the helpless prey forces both within and without. From the broad, interdisciplinary perspective that marks Fromm’s distinguished oeuvre, he shows that psychology cannot divorce itself from the problems of philosophy and ethics, and that human nature cannot be understood without understanding the values and moral conflicts that confront (...)
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  45.  14
    Patricia J. Faulkender, Lillian M. Range, Michelle Hamilton, Marlow Strehlow, Sarah Jackson, Elmer Blanchard & Paul Dean (1994). The Case of the Stolen Psychology Test: An Analysis of an Actual Cheating Incident. Ethics and Behavior 4 (3):209 – 217.
    We examined the attitudes of 600 students in large introductory algebra and psychology classes toward an actual or hypothetical cheating incident and the subsequent retake procedure. Overall, 57% of students in one class and 49Y0 in the other reported that they either cheated or would have cheated if given the opportunity. More men (59%) than women (53%) reported cheating or potential cheating. Students who had actually experienced a retake procedure to handle cheating were more satisfied with such a (...)
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  46. William W. Fortenbaugh (2006). Aristotle's Practical Side: On His Psychology, Ethics, Politics and Rhetoric. Brill.
    Aristotle’s analysis of emotion and his moral psychology are discussed, as are the relation of virtue to emotion, the status of animals, human friendship and the subordinate role of slaves and women. Persuasion through words and character also receive attention.
     
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  47.  18
    Andrea Whittaker (2004). Abortion, Sin, and the State in Thailand. Routledgecurzon.
    Although abortion remains one of the most controversial issues of our age, to date most studies have centered on the debate in Western countries. This book discusses abortion in a non-Western, non-Christian context - in Thailand, where, although abortion is illegal, over 200,000 to 300,000 abortions are performed each year by a variety of methods. The book, based on extensive original research in the field, examines a wide range of issues, including stories of the real-life dilemmas facing women, popular (...)
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  48. Deborah A. O'Neil, Margaret M. Hopkins & Diana Bilimoria (2008). Women's Careers at the Start of the 21st Century: Patterns and Paradoxes. Journal of Business Ethics 80 (4):727-743.
    In this article we assess the extant literature on women's careers appearing in selected career, management and psychology journals from 1990 to the present to determine what is currently known about the state of women's careers at the dawn of the 21st century. Based on this review, we identify four patterns that cumulatively contribute to the current state of the literature on women's careers: women's careers are embedded in women's larger-life contexts, families and careers (...)
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  49.  10
    Christine E. Stanik & Phoebe C. Ellsworth (2010). Who Cares About Marrying a Rich Man? Intelligence and Variation in Women's Mate Preferences. Human Nature 21 (2):203-217.
    Although robust sex differences are abundant in men and women’s mating psychology, there is a considerable degree of overlap between the two as well. In an effort to understand where and when this overlap exists, the current study provides an exploration of within-sex variation in women’s mate preferences. We hypothesized that women’s intelligence, given an environment where women can use that intelligence to attain educational and career opportunities, would be: (1) positively related to their willingness (...)
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  50.  11
    Carolina Armenteros (2012). 'True Love' and Rousseau's Philosophy of History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (2):258-282.
    Rousseau, a philosopher of history? The suggestion may startle those who know him as an enemy of history, the founder of Counter-Enlightenment who rejected his century’s hope in progress and conjured quasi-utopias devoid of time. Alone, the political texts seem to justify this interpretation. Side by side with the Emile and Julie sagas, however, they disclose a new Rousseau, the weaver of a master plot that governs private and public history. This essay describes Jean-Jacques’ overarching narrative and the two main (...)
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