Search results for 'Women Psychology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jeanne E. Gullahorn (1979). Psychology and Women: In Transition. Distributed by Halsted Press.score: 180.0
  2. David M. Buss & Joshua Duntley (1999). The Evolutionary Psychology of Patriarchy: Women Are Not Passive Pawns in Men's Game. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):219-220.score: 132.0
    We applaud Campbell's cogent arguments for the evolution of female survival mechanisms but take issue with several key conceptual claims: the treatment of patriarchy; the implicit assumption that women are passive pawns in a male game of media exploitation; and the neglect of the possibility that media images exploit existing evolved psychological mechanisms rather than create them.
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  3. Kristine A. Komada (1988). Psychology and Women's Studies: Epistemological Dilemma or Opportunity? Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 8 (2):40-47.score: 126.0
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  4. Brigitte H. E. Niestroj (1994). Women as Mothers and the Making of the European Mind: A Contribution to the History of Developmental Psychology and Primary Socialization. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 24 (3):281–303.score: 120.0
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  5. Belinda Brooks-Grodon (2002). Suzanne M. Zeedyk, and Fiona E. Raitt, The Implicit Relation of Psychology and Law: Women and Syndrome Evidence. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 10 (2):195-197.score: 120.0
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  6. Denis Hill (1946). Psychology of Women. Vol. I: Girlhood. The Eugenics Review 38 (3):151.score: 120.0
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  7. J. S. Judge (2001). Persuasion, Feminism, and the New Psychology of Women: Anne Elliot's Constancy, Courage, and Creativity. Journal of Thought 36 (2):39-54.score: 120.0
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  8. Paula Nicolson (1992). Feminism and Academic Psychology: Towards a Psychology of Women? In Kate Campbell (ed.), Critical Feminism: Argument in the Disciplines. Open University Press. 53--82.score: 120.0
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  9. Sue Wilkinson & Celia Kitzinger (eds.) (1996). Representing the Other: A Feminism & Psychology Reader. Sage Publications.score: 106.0
    Identifying a range of key concerns related to representation and difference, Representing the Other offers a provocative agenda for the future development of feminist theory and practice. The book's contributors, including many key international researchers in women's studies, draw on personal experiences of speaking "for" and "about" others in their research, professional practice, academic writing, or political activism. They highlight problems of representing the Other with an ethnic or cultural background different from one's own and extend discussions of "Othering" (...)
     
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  10. Louise Levesque-Lopman (1988). Claiming Reality: Phenomenology and Women's Experience. Rowman & Littlefield.score: 90.0
  11. Idun Røseth, Per-Einar Binder & Ulrik Fredrik Malt (2013). Engulfed by an Alienated and Threatening Emotional Body: The Essential Meaning Structure of Depression in Women. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 44 (2):153-178.score: 84.0
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  12. Eva Feder Kittay & Diana T. Meyers (eds.) (1987). Women and Moral Theory. Rowman & Littlefield.score: 84.0
     
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  13. Helga Kuhse (1997). Caring: Nurses, Women, and Ethics. Blackwell Publishers.score: 78.0
  14. John Klasios (2014). The Evolutionary Psychology of Human Mating: A Response to Buller's Critique. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 47:1-11.score: 66.0
    In this paper, I critique arguments made by philosopher David Buller against central evolutionary-psychological explanations of human mating. Specifically, I aim to rebut his criticisms of Evolutionary Psychology regarding (1) women's long-term mating preferences for high-status men; (2) the evolutionary rationale behind men's provisioning of women; (3) men's mating preferences for young women; (4) women's adaptation for extra-pair sex; (5) the sex-differentiated evolutionary theory of human jealousy; and (6) the notion of mate value. In sum, (...)
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  15. Allison Weir (1996). Sacrificial Logics: Feminist Theory and the Critique of Identity. Routledge.score: 66.0
    Contemporary feminist theory is at an impasse: the project of reformulating concepts of self and social identity is thwarted by an association between identity and oppression and victimhood. In Sacrificial Logics, Allison Weir proposes a way out of this impasse through a concept of identity which depends on accepting difference. Weir argues that the equation of identity with repression and domination links "relational" feminists like Nancy Chodorow, who equate self-identity with the repression of connection to others, and poststructuralist feminists like (...)
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  16. Elizabeth A. Wilson (1998). Neural Geographies: Feminism and the Microstructure of Cognition. Routledge.score: 66.0
    Neural Geographies draws together recent feminist and deconstructive theories, early Freudian neurology and contemporary connectionist theories of cognition. In this original work, Elizabeth A. Wilson explores the convergence between Derrida, Freud and recent cognitive theory to pursue two important issues: the nature of cognition and neurology, and the politics of feminist and critical interventions into contemporary scientific psychology. This book seeks to reorient the usual presumptions of critical studies of the sciences by addressing the divisions between the static and (...)
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  17. Deborah A. O'Neil, Margaret M. Hopkins & Diana Bilimoria (2008). Women's Careers at the Start of the 21st Century: Patterns and Paradoxes. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 80 (4):727 - 743.score: 66.0
    In this article we assess the extant literature on women's careers appearing in selected career, management and psychology journals from 1990 to the present to determine what is currently known about the state of women's careers at the dawn of the 21st century. Based on this review, we identify four patterns that cumulatively contribute to the current state of the literature on women's careers: women's careers are embedded in women's larger-life contexts, families and careers (...)
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  18. Deborah A. O.’Neil, Margaret M. Hopkins & Diana Bilimoria (2008). Women's Careers at the Start of the 21st Century: Patterns and Paradoxes. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 80 (4):727 - 743.score: 66.0
    In this article we assess the extant literature on women’s careers appearing in selected career, management and psychology journals from 1990 to the present to determine what is currently known about the state of women’s careers at the dawn of the 21st century. Based on this review, we identify four patterns that cumulatively contribute to the current state of the literature on women’s careers: women’s careers are embedded in women’s larger-life contexts, families and careers (...)
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  19. Jane M. Ussher (2003). The Role of Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder in the Subjectification of Women. Journal of Medical Humanities 24 (1-2):131-146.score: 66.0
    This paper will examine the way in which premenstrual symptomatology has been represented and regulated by psychology and psychiatry. It questions the “truths” about women's premenstrual experiences that circulate in scientific discourse, namely the fictions framed as facts that serve to regulate femininity, reproduction, and what it is to be “woman.” Hegemonic truths that define Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD) and its nosological predecessor Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) are examined to illustrate how regimes of objectified knowledge and practices of “assemblage” (...)
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  20. Michael Billig (1994). Celebrating Argument Within Psychology: Dialogue, Negation, and Feminist Critique. [REVIEW] Argumentation 8 (1):49-61.score: 66.0
    This article explores the celebratory aspect of psychological theories. In particular, it examines the celebration of dialogue, argumentation, and negativity, which is contained within recent critical theories of psychology. This psychological approach is compared with cognitive psychology's celebration of monologue. The relations between dialogical/rhetorical psychology and feminist critiques are examined. Following Habermas, it is suggested that it is necessary to point to instances of unconstrained argumentation in order to show that the utopian elements in the celebration of (...)
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  21. Geoff Kushnick (2013). Why Do the Karo Batak Prefer Women with Big Feet? Human Nature 24 (3):268-279.score: 66.0
    Men may find women with small feet relative to body size more attractive because foot size reliably indexes nubility—i.e., age and parity. I collected judgments of attractiveness in response to drawings of women with varying foot sizes from a sample of 159 Karo Batak respondents from North Sumatra, Indonesia, as part of a collaborative project on foot size and attractiveness. The data revealed a contrarian preference among the Karo Batak for women with big feet. The judgments were (...)
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  22. Steven Carter (1993). He's Scared, She's Scared: Understanding the Hidden Fears That Sabotage Your Relationships. Delacorte Press.score: 66.0
    Available for the first time in paperback, this follow-up to the phenomenally successful Men Who Can't Love tackles the issue of commitmentphobia, that persistent obstacle to truly satisfying contemporary relationships. Authors Stephen Carter and Julia Sokol explore why modern men and women are torn between the desire for intimacy and the equally intense need for independence. Drawing on numerous interviews and real-life scenarios, and written with humor, insight, and the kind of wisdom gained by personal experience, He's Scared, She's (...)
     
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  23. Keith Littler (2007). The Ordination of Women and Inclusivity Within the Church in Wales: Theological and Psychological Considerations. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 29 (1):319-324.score: 66.0
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  24. Florence Nightingale (1992). Cassandra and Other Selections From Suggestions for Thought. New York University Press.score: 66.0
    "An impressively reasoned and startlingly unorthodox treatise on religion." - Belles Lettres Florence Nightingale (1820-1920) is famous as the heroine of the Crimean War and later as a campaigner for health care founded on a clean environment and good nursing. Though best known for her pioneering demonstration that disease rather than wounds killed most soldiers, she was also heavily allied to social reform movements and to feminist protest against the enforced idleness of middle-class women. This original edition provides bold (...)
     
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  25. Iris Marion Young (2005). On Female Body Experience: "Throwing Like a Girl" and Other Essays. Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
    Written over a span of more than two decades, the essays by Iris Marion Young collected in this volume describe diverse aspects of women's lived body experience in modern Western societies. Drawing on the ideas of several twentieth century continental philosophers--including Simone de Beauvoir, Martin Heidegger, Luce Irigaray, Julia Kristeva, and Maurice Merleau-Ponty--Young constructs rigorous analytic categories for interpreting embodied subjectivity. The essays combine theoretical description of experience with normative evaluation of the unjust constraints on their freedom and opportunity (...)
     
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  26. Faye E. Thompson (2003). Mothers and Midwives: The Ethical Journey. Books for Midwives.score: 60.0
    Faye Thompson believes there is and draws upon personal narratives from both mothers and midwives to support this belief.
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  27. Jochen Fahrenberg Marcus Cheetham (2007). Assumptions About Human Nature and the Impact of Philosophical Concepts on Professional Issues: A Questionnaire-Based Study with 800 Students From Psychology, Philosophy, and Science. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (3):pp. 183-201.score: 60.0
    Philosophical anthropology is concerned with assumptions about human nature, differential psychology with the empirical investigation of such belief systems. A questionnaire composed of 64 questions concerning brain and consciousness, free will, evolution, meaning of life, belief in God, and theodicy problem was used to gather data from 563 students of psychology at seven universities and from 233 students enrolled in philosophy or the natural sciences. Essential concepts were monism–dualism–complementarity, atheism–agnosticism–deism–theism, attitude toward transcendence–immanence, and self-ratings of religiosity and interest (...)
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  28. Patricia Greenspan (2001). Good Evolutionary Reasons: Darwinian Psychiatry and Women's Depression. Philosophical Psychology 14 (3):327 – 338.score: 60.0
    The language of evolutionary biology and psychology is built on concepts applicable in the first instance to individual strategic rationality but extended to the level of genetic explanation. Current discussions of mental disorders as evolutionary adaptations would apply that extended language back to the individual level, with potentially problematic moral/political implications as well as possibilities of confusion. This paper focuses on one particularly problematic area: the explanation of women's greater tendency to depression. The suggestion that there are "good (...)
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  29. Cynthia Burack (2004). Healing Identities: Black Feminist Thought and the Politics of Groups. Cornell University Press.score: 60.0
    Psychoanalysis, race, and racism -- From psychoanalysis to political theory -- Reparative group leadership -- Conflict and authenticity -- Bonding and solidarity -- Coalitions and reparative politics.
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  30. Susan J. Hekman (1995). Moral Voices, Moral Selves: Carol Gilligan and Feminist Moral Theory. Pennsylvania State University Press.score: 60.0
    Using the work of Wittgenstein and Foucault, she outlines the parameters of a discursive morality and its implications for feminism and moral theory.
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  31. Lauren Gail Berlant (2008). The Female Complaint: The Unfinished Business of Sentimentality in American Culture. Duke University Press.score: 60.0
    Poor Eliza -- Pax Americana : the case of Show boat -- National brands, national body : Imitation of life -- Uncle Sam needs a wife : citizenship and denegation -- Remembering love, forgetting everything else : Now, voyager -- "It's not the tragedies that kill us, it's the messes" : femininity, formalism, and Dorothy Parker -- The compulsion to repeat femininity : Landscape for a good woman and The life and loves of a she-devil.
     
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  32. Jackie Hayden (2007). A Man in a Woman's World. Killynon House Books.score: 60.0
     
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  33. Mary Vetterling-Braggin (ed.) (1982). "Femininity," "Masculinity," and "Androgyny": A Modern Philosophical Discussion. Littlefield, Adams.score: 60.0
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  34. Wei Xiao (2007). Zai Tai Yang Zhao Bu Dao de di Fang Xing Zou =. Jiu Zhou Chu Ban She.score: 60.0
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  35. Toni Adleberg, Morgan Thompson & Eddy Nahmias (forthcoming). Do Men and Women Have Different Philosophical Intuitions? Further Data. Philosophical Psychology:1-27.score: 54.0
    To address the underrepresentation of women in philosophy effectively, we must understand the causes of the loss of women after their initial philosophy classes. In this paper we challenge one of the few explanations that has focused on why women might leave philosophy at early stages. Wesley Buckwalter and Stephen Stich (2014) offer some evidence that women have different intuitions than men about philosophical thought experiments. We present some concerns about their evidence and we discuss our (...)
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  36. Don Browning (2003). Feminism, Family, and Women's Rights: A Hermeneutic Realist Perspective. Zygon 38 (2):317-332.score: 54.0
    In this article I apply the insights of hermeneutic realism to a practical-theological ethics that addresses the international crisis of families and women’s rights. Hermeneutic realism affirms the hermeneutic philosophy of Hans-Georg Gadamer but enriches it with the dialectic of participation and distanciation developed by Paul Ricoeur. This approach finds a place for sciences such as evolutionary psychology within a hermeneutically informed ethic. It also points to a multidimensional model of practical reason that views it as implicitly or (...)
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  37. Andrea Whittaker (2004). Abortion, Sin, and the State in Thailand. Routledgecurzon.score: 54.0
    Although abortion remains one of the most controversial issues of our age, to date most studies have centered on the debate in Western countries. This book discusses abortion in a non-Western, non-Christian context - in Thailand, where, although abortion is illegal, over 200,000 to 300,000 abortions are performed each year by a variety of methods. The book, based on extensive original research in the field, examines a wide range of issues, including stories of the real-life dilemmas facing women, popular (...)
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  38. Rachel Mckinnon (2014). Stereotype Threat and Attributional Ambiguity for Trans Women. Hypatia 29 (1).score: 54.0
    In this paper I discuss the interrelated topics of stereotype threat and attributional ambiguity as they relate to gender and gender identity. The former has become an emerging topic in feminist philosophy and has spawned a tremendous amount of research in social psychology and elsewhere. But the discussion, at least in how it connects to gender, is incomplete: the focus is only on cisgender women and their experiences. By considering trans women's experiences of stereotype threat and attributional (...)
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  39. Patricia J. Faulkender, Lillian M. Range, Michelle Hamilton, Marlow Strehlow, Sarah Jackson, Elmer Blanchard & Paul Dean (1994). The Case of the Stolen Psychology Test: An Analysis of an Actual Cheating Incident. Ethics and Behavior 4 (3):209 – 217.score: 54.0
    We examined the attitudes of 600 students in large introductory algebra and psychology classes toward an actual or hypothetical cheating incident and the subsequent retake procedure. Overall, 57% of students in one class and 49Y0 in the other reported that they either cheated or would have cheated if given the opportunity. More men (59%) than women (53%) reported cheating or potential cheating. Students who had actually experienced a retake procedure to handle cheating were more satisfied with such a (...)
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  40. Lisa Tessman (2005). Burdened Virtues: Virtue Ethics for Liberatory Struggles. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    Lisa Tessman's Burdened Virtues is a deeply original and provocative work that engages questions central to feminist theory and practice, from the perspective of Aristotelian ethics. Focused primarily on selves who endure and resist oppression, she addresses the ways in which devastating conditions confronted by these selves both limit and burden their moral goodness, and affect their possibilities of flourishing. She describes two different forms of "moral trouble" prevalent under oppression. The first is that the oppressed self may be morally (...)
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  41. A. O'Neil Deborah, M. Hopkins Margaret & Diana Bilimoria (2008). Women's Careers at the Start of the 21st Century: Patterns and Paradoxes. Journal of Business Ethics 80 (4).score: 54.0
    In this article we assess the extant literature on women’s careers appearing in selected career, management and psychology journals from 1990 to the present to determine what is currently known about the state of women’s careers at the dawn of the 21st century. Based on this review, we identify four patterns that cumulatively contribute to the current state of the literature on women’s careers: women’s careers are embedded in women’s larger-life contexts, families and careers (...)
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  42. Patricia Greenspan, Darwinian Psychiatry and Women's Depression.score: 54.0
    The language of evolutionary biology and psychology is built on concepts applicable in the first instance to individual strategic rationality but extended to the level of genetic explanation. Current discussions of mental disorders as evolutionary adaptations would apply that extended language back to the individual level, with potentially problematic moral/political implications as well as possibilities of confusion. This paper focuses on one particularly problematic area: the explanation of women's greater tendency to depression. The suggestion that there are "good (...)
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  43. Christine E. Stanik & Phoebe C. Ellsworth (2010). Who Cares About Marrying a Rich Man? Intelligence and Variation in Women's Mate Preferences. Human Nature 21 (2):203-217.score: 54.0
    Although robust sex differences are abundant in men and women’s mating psychology, there is a considerable degree of overlap between the two as well. In an effort to understand where and when this overlap exists, the current study provides an exploration of within-sex variation in women’s mate preferences. We hypothesized that women’s intelligence, given an environment where women can use that intelligence to attain educational and career opportunities, would be: (1) positively related to their willingness (...)
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  44. Sara Alpern (1990). Eating Disorders Among Women: An Historical Review of the Literature From a Women's History Perspective. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 7 (3-4):47-55.score: 54.0
    Within a relatively brief period of time, there has been a veritable outpouring of research on anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. This article presents a concise overview of some of the major works on these eating disorders from a variety of disciplines including biomedicine, psychology, sociology, and history. The article establishes a general context of Americans' preoccupation with food and diet. However, since the majority of those suffering from anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are female, this article places these (...)
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  45. Erich Fromm (1947/1990). Man for Himself: An Inquiry Into the Psychology of Ethics. H. Holt.score: 54.0
    In Man for Himself , Erich Fromm examines the confusion of modern women and men who, because they lack faith in any principle by which life ought to be guided, become the helpless prey forces both within and without. From the broad, interdisciplinary perspective that marks Fromm’s distinguished oeuvre, he shows that psychology cannot divorce itself from the problems of philosophy and ethics, and that human nature cannot be understood without understanding the values and moral conflicts that confront (...)
     
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  46. Solomon Schimmel (1997). The Seven Deadly Sins: Jewish, Christian, and Classical Reflections on Human Psychology. OUP USA.score: 54.0
    All of us are engaged in a personal, ongoing battle with sin and vice. The seven deadly sins - lust, greed, envy, anger, pride, gluttony, and sloth - are our main antagonists in this struggle. They are primary causes of unhappiness and immorality, and because of their pervasive nature, have been of perennial interest to religious thinkers, philosophers, dramatists, and poets. In The Seven Deadly Sins, Solomon Schimmel explains why psychology must incorporate many of the ethical and spiritual values (...)
     
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  47. Chong Ju Choi & Sae Won Kim (2008). Women and Globalization: Ethical Dimensions of Knowledge Transfer in Global Organizations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 81 (1):53 - 61.score: 50.0
    The topic of women and globalization raises fundamental questions on the impact of globalization on women, ethnic minorities and other socio-demographically under-represented actors in global organizations. This article seeks to integrate theories of procedural justice, psychological contracts, motivation and psychological ownership in knowledge transfer in global organizations, and the implications for women, and other under-represented actors. Our analysis concurs with current research on the need for a relativist perspective in business ethics research and one that encompasses the (...)
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  48. Carolina Armenteros (2012). 'True Love' and Rousseau's Philosophy of History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (2):258-282.score: 48.0
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  49. Elaine Hoffman Baruch (1996). She Speaks/He Listens: Women on the French Analyst's Couch. Routledge.score: 48.0
    Although much attention has been given to Jacques Lacan in his rereading of Freud and to French women analysts in their deconstruction of traditional psychoanalysis, little has been available in the US on contemporary male French analysts and their treatment of women. She Speaks/He Listens illustrates the range of thought among some well-known French male psychoanalysts today--from Lacanians to anti-Lacanians to eclectics--with regard to women and sexual difference. Through the interview format, with its possibilities for surprise and (...)
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  50. Elisabeth Roudinesco (2009). Our Dark Side: A History of Perversion. Polity.score: 48.0
    The sublime and the abject -- Sade pro and contra Sade -- Dark enlightenment or barbaric science -- The Auschwitz confessions -- The perverse society.
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