Search results for 'Women and literature' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Marlies Kronegger, Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka, World Institute for Advanced Phenomenological Research and Learning, International Society for Phenomenology and Literature & International Phenomenology Congress (1994). Allegory Old and New in Literature, Fine Art, Music and Theatre and its Continuity in Culture.
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  2. Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka & International Society for Phenomenology and Literature (1982). The Philosophical Reflection of Man in Literature Selected Papers From Several Conferences Held by the International Society for Phenomenology and Literature in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
     
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  3. Lorrayne Y. Baird-Lange, Thomas A. Copeland & Hildegard Schnuttgen (1989). Women in History, Literature, and the Arts a Festschrift for Hildegard Schnuttgen in Honor of Her Thirty Years of Outstanding Service at Youngstown State University. Youngstown State University.
  4. Françoise Lionnet (1995). Postcolonial Representations: Women, Literature. In H. Harris (ed.), Identity. Oxford University Press 1968--1988.
  5. Shaheen Borna & Gwendolen White (2003). "Sex" and "Gender": Two Confused and Confusing Concepts in the "Women in Corporate Management" Literature. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 47 (2):89 - 99.
    In this article we attempt to reduce the confusion surrounding the concepts of "sex" and "gender" in the literature of "Women in Corporate Management." We contend that the incorrect usage of these concepts not only creates confusion in the literature, but also casts a shadow over the research findings in this area. We offer specific recommendations for authors as means to reduce the confusion in future research.
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  6.  30
    J. Wolff (1985). The Invisible Flaneuse. Women and the Literature of Modernity. Theory, Culture and Society 2 (3):37-46.
    The literature of modernity, describing the fleeting, anonymous, ephemeral encounters of life in the metropolis, mainly accounts for the experiences of men. It ignores the concomitant separation of public and private spheres from the mid-nineteenth century, and the increasing segregation of the sexes around that separation. The influential writings of Baudelaire, Simmel, Benjamin and, more recently, Richard Sennett and Marshall Berman, by equating the modern with the public, thus fail to describe women's experience of modernity. The central figure (...)
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  7. Sally Mcconnell-Ginet, Ruth Borker & Nelly Furman (1980). Women and Language in Literature and Society. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  8.  7
    Michael Calabrese (1994). Bodytalk: When Women Speak in Old French Literature (Review). Philosophy and Literature 18 (2):373-374.
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  9.  6
    Penelope Pether (2001). Review Essay Dieter Paul Polloczek,Literature and Legal Discourse: Equity and Ethics From Sterne to Conrad; ISBN 052165251, 269 Pp. + Viii, Hb., $59.95. Lynne Marie De Cicco,Women and Lawyers in the Mid-Nineteenth Century English Novel: Uneasy Alliances and Narrative Misrepresentation; ISBN 0773487565; 336 Pp., Hb., $42.78. [REVIEW] Cardozo Studies in Law and Literature 13 (2):323-328.
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  10.  5
    Sara Alpern (1990). Eating Disorders Among Women: An Historical Review of the Literature From a Women's History Perspective. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 7 (3-4):47-55.
    Within a relatively brief period of time, there has been a veritable outpouring of research on anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. This article presents a concise overview of some of the major works on these eating disorders from a variety of disciplines including biomedicine, psychology, sociology, and history. The article establishes a general context of Americans' preoccupation with food and diet. However, since the majority of those suffering from anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are female, this article places these eating (...)
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  11.  5
    Elisheva Baumgarten (2007). Carmen Caballero-Navas, Ed. And Trans., “The Book of Women's Love” and Jewish Medieval Medical Literature on Women: Sefer Ahavat Nashim. (The Kegan Paul Library of Jewish Studies.) London, New York, and Bahrain: Kegan Paul, 2004. Pp. Viii, 314; Diagrams. [REVIEW] Speculum 82 (3):688-690.
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  12.  4
    Kathryn L. Lynch (2008). Keiko Hamaguchi, Non-European Women in Chaucer: A Postcolonial Study.(Studies in English Medieval Language and Literature, 14.) Frankfurt Am Main: Peter Lang, 2006. Paper. Pp. Ix, 194. $43.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 83 (3):706-708.
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  13.  8
    Caroline Jewers (2006). Lisa Perfetti, Women and Laughter in Medieval Comic Literature. Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan Press, 2003. Pp. Xiii, 286; 2 Black-and-White Figures. $57.50. [REVIEW] Speculum 81 (2):581-583.
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  14.  2
    Jana K. Schulman (2015). Jóhanna Katrín Friđriksdóttir, Women in Old Norse Literature: Bodies, Words, and Power. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013. Pp. Xiv, 192. $95. ISBN: 978-0-230-12042-6. [REVIEW] Speculum 90 (1):263-265.
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  15.  10
    Ana Isla (2013). Douglas A. Vakoch, Editor. Feminist Ecocriticism: Environment, Women, and Literature. Environmental Philosophy 10 (1):127-130.
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  16.  13
    Gillian Clark (1994). Roman Women Gunhild Vidén: Women in Roman Literature: Attitudes of Authors Under the Early Empire. (Studia Graeca Et Latina Gothoburgensia, 57.) Pp. 194. Göteborg: Acta Universitatis Gothoburgensis, 1993. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 44 (02):292-293.
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  17.  5
    Peter Anstey & Jocelyn Harris (2012). Introduction: Women, Philosophy and Literature in the Early Modern Period. Intellectual History Review 22 (3):323-325.
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  18.  5
    J. Brookman, M. Cieri, C. Peeps, M. Davies, N. Naffine, W. McElroy, L. Kuo, T. Mansoor, A. Morris & T. O’Donnell (2003). Anderson, E., Judging Bertha Wilson, Law as Large as Life (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2001). Aristodemou, M., Law and Literature (Oxford: OUP, 2000). Beveridge, F., Nott, S. And Stephen, K., Eds., Making Women Count: Integrating Gender Into Law and Policy Making (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2000). [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 11:117-118.
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  19.  2
    Rudolph M. Bell (1987). Elizabeth Alvilda Petroff, Ed., Medieval Women's Visionary Literature. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1986. Pp. Xii, 402. $29.95 (Cloth); $12.95 (Paper). [REVIEW] Speculum 62 (4):980-982.
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  20.  2
    David Jacoby (2011). E. Jane Burns, Sea of Silk: A Textile Geography of Women's Work in Medieval French Literature. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2009. Pp. Viii, 264; 18 Black-and-White Figures. $59.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 86 (1):170-172.
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  21.  2
    Deborah McGrady (2002). Rosalind Brown-Grant, Christine de Pizan and the Moral Defence of Women: Reading Beyond Gender.(Cambridge Studies in Medieval Literature, 40.) Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 1999. Pp. Xiv, 224. $64.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 77 (3):884-886.
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  22.  11
    Nannerl O. Keohane (1982). Feminist Scholarship and Human Nature:Woman and Nature. Susan Griffin; Women in Western Political Thought. Susan Moller Okin; Women of Spirit: Female Leadership in the Jewish and Christian Traditions. Rosemary Ruether, Eleanor McLaughlin; The Nature of Woman: An Encyclopedia and Guide to the Literature. Mary Anne Warren; Equality and the Rights of Women. Elizabeth H. Wolgast. [REVIEW] Ethics 93 (1):102-.
  23.  3
    William D. Paden (1997). Pierre Bec, Ed. And Trans,(Into French), Chants d'Amour des Femmes-Troubadours: Trobairitz Et “Chansons de Femme.”(Sèrie “Moyen Age.”) Paris: Stock, 1995. Pp. 264. F 120. Matilda Tomaryn Bruckner, Laurie Shepard, and Sarah White, Eds. And Transs., Songs of the Women Troubadours.(Garland Library of Medieval Literature, 97A.) New York and London: Garland, 1995. Pp. Lxxvii, 194; 1 Map. $42. [REVIEW] Speculum 72 (3):783-786.
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  24.  10
    Maria Wyke (1990). Women Writers in Antiquity Jane McIntosh Snyder: The Woman and the Lyre: Women Writers in Classical Greece and Rome. (Ad Feminam: Women and Literature.) Pp. Xvi+199; 1 Map, Carbondale, Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press, 1989. $24.95. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 40 (02):294-295.
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  25.  4
    Jana K. Schulman (2004). Sarah M. Anderson, Ed., with Karen Swenson, Cold Counsel: Women in Old Norse Literature and Mythology. New York and London: Routledge, 2002. Pp. Xvi, 304; Black-and-White Frontispiece, Black-and-White Figures, and 1 Map. [REVIEW] Speculum 79 (2):444-446.
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  26.  9
    Janet Huskinson (2005). Women and Cult Practices L. Larsson Lovén, A. Strömberg (Edd.): Gender, Cult, and Culture in the Ancient World From Mycenae to Byzantium. Proceedings of the Second Nordic Symposium on Gender and Women's History in Antiquity, Helsinki 20–22 October 2000 . (Studies in Mediterranean Archaeology and Literature Pocket-Book 166.) Pp. 168, Ill, Pls. Sävedalen: Paul Åströms Förlag, 2003. Cased, US$29.80. ISBN: 91-7018-127-X. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (01):296-.
  27.  2
    Joan M. Ferrante (1998). Susan L. Smith, The Power of Women: A “Topos” in Medieval Art and Literature. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1995. Pp. Xvii, 294 Plus 48 Black-and-White Figures; 1 Diagram. [REVIEW] Speculum 73 (2):598-600.
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  28.  4
    Lisa Williams, Wendy Jones, Glyn Elwyn & Adrian Edwards (2008). Interactive Patient Decision Aids for Women Facing Genetic Testing for Familial Breast Cancer: A Systematic Web and Literature Review. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 14 (1):70-74.
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  29.  6
    J. Wight Duff (1924). Fowler's Roman Literature A History of Roman Literature. By Harold N. Fowler, Ph.D., Professor in the College for Women of Western Reserve University. Pp. X + 316 ; Frontispiece and Three Other Illustrations. New York: The Macmillan Company. Second Edition, 1923. 14s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 38 (1-2):40-41.
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  30.  1
    Peggy McCracken (1995). E. Jane Burns, Bodytalk: When Women Speak in Old French Literature.(New Cultural Studies.) Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1993. Pp. Xvii, 277. $36.95 (Cloth); $14.95 (Paper). [REVIEW] Speculum 70 (2):346-348.
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  31.  6
    Christiane Sourvinou-Inwood (1994). Praeficae G. Holst-Warhaft: Dangerous Voices: Women's Laments and Greek Literature. Pp. X + 227. London and New York: Routledge, 1992. Cased, £35. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 44 (01):67-69.
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  32.  5
    Carolyn Korsmeyer (2010). Women, Philosophy, and Literature. By JANE DURAN. Hypatia 25 (2):476-479.
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  33.  1
    William E. Deal (2010). Book Review: R. Keller Kimbrough, Preachers, Poets, Women, and the Way: Izumi Shikibu and the Buddhist Literature of Medieval Japan. [REVIEW] Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 37 (1):163-167.
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  34.  1
    Karen A. Winstead (2006). Mary C. Erler, Women, Reading, and Piety in Late Medieval England. (Cambridge Studies in Medieval Literature.) Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 2002. Pp. Xii, 226; Black-and-White Frontispiece, 12 Black-and-White Figures, and 1 Table. [REVIEW] Speculum 81 (4):1184-1185.
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  35.  1
    Nancy B. Black (2013). Carol J. Harvey, Medieval French Miracle Plays: Seven Falsely Accused Women. (Dublin Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature 4.) Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2011. Pp. 167; Color Figs. $50. ISBN: 9781846822735. [REVIEW] Speculum 88 (1):307-308.
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  36.  1
    Carole Edwards (2012). Thiefing Sugar Eroticism Between Women in Caribbean Literature (Review). Intertexts 16 (2):81-83.
  37. S. Andresen (1989). Women Technology Work-a Report on the Literature. ARGUMENT 31 (2):225-234.
     
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  38. Ulrike Bergermann (2002). Her Latest Book is Titled, Daughters of The Goddess, Daughters of Imperialism: African Women, Culture, Power and Democracy (London: Zed Books, 2000). Sibylle Benninghojf-Liihl, Visiting Professor at the Institute of German Literature at Humboldt-University of Berlin. Research and Teaching in Nigeria and Brazil. DFG-Scholarship on" The Aesthetics of the Wild. People-Shows in Germany. [REVIEW] In Insa Härtel & Sigrid Schade (eds.), Body and Representation. Leske + Budrich 6--223.
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  39. Danielle Carlotti-Smith (2012). Thiefing Sugar: Eroticism Between Women in Caribbean Literature (Review). Symploke 20 (1):399-402.
  40. Mary Evans & David Morgan (1979). Work on Women a Guide to the Literature. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  41. Jennifer Ruth Hosek (2010). Spaces of the Urban. Gendered Urban Spaces: Cultural Mediations on the City in Eighteenth-Century German Women's Writing / Diana Spokiene ; The Roots of German Theater's "Spatial Turn": Gerhart Hauptmann's Social-Spatial Dramas / Amy Strahler Holzapfel ; Urban Mediations: The Theoretical Space of Siegfried Kracauer's Ginster / Eric Jarosinski ; Protesting the Globalized Metropolis: The Local as Counterspace in Recent Berlin Literature / Bastian Heinsohn ; Transnational Cinema and the Ruins of Berlin and Havana: Die Neue Kunst, Ruinen Zu Bauen [The New Art of Making Ruins, 2007] and Suite Habana (2003). [REVIEW] In Jaimey Fisher & Barbara Caroline Mennel (eds.), Spatial Turns: Space, Place, and Mobility in German Literary and Visual Culture. Rodopi
     
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  42. M. Johnson (2003). Making Silence Speak: Women's Voices in Greek Literature and Society. Edited by Andre Lardinois and Laura McClure. The European Legacy 8 (4):520-521.
  43. Nancy Jones (1994). Bodytalk: When Women Speak in Old French Literature. [REVIEW] The Medieval Review 11.
     
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  44. C. Leahy-Dios (2000). Women and Literature in Britain, 1150-1500. Edited by Carol M. Meale. The European Legacy 5 (2):306-306.
  45. M. Lyons (2002). Women and Literature in Britain, 1700-1800. Edited by Vivien Jones. The European Legacy 7 (3):408-408.
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  46. Edna Manlapaz (2000). Literature in English by Filipino Women. Feminist Studies 26:187-200.
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  47. Anne E. Martindale (2007). Chapter Eleven Portrayal of Women and Jungian Anima Figures in Literature: Quantitative Content Analytic Studies Anne E. Martindale and Colin Martindale. In L. I͡A Dorfman, Colin Martindale & Vladimir Petrov (eds.), Aesthetics and Innovation. Cambridge Scholars Pub. 205.
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  48. Harold Osborne (1979). "A Literature of Their Own. British Women Novelists From Brontë to Lessing": Elaine Showalter. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 19 (1):88.
     
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  49. Monica Brzezinski Potkay (2009). DH Green, Women Readers in the Middle Ages.(Cambridge Studies in Medieval Literature, 65.) Cambridge, Eng., and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007. Pp. Xi, 296; 14 Black-and-White Figures. $95. [REVIEW] Speculum 84 (3):721-722.
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  50. Anne Savage (2003). Shari Horner, The Discourse of Enclosure: Representing Women in Old English Literature. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 2001. Pp. Ix, 207; 1 Black-and-White Figure. [REVIEW] Speculum 78 (2):520-523.
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