Search results for 'Women and peace' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Representing Women (1994). Racism in Pornography and the Women's Movement. In Alison M. Jaggar (ed.), Living with Contradictions: Controversies in Feminist Social Ethics. Westview Press. 171.score: 80.0
  2. Hilary Charlesworth (2008). Are Women Peaceful? Reflections on the Role of Women in Peace-Building. Feminist Legal Studies 16 (3):347-361.score: 75.0
    This paper examines the way that women’s relationship to peace is constructed in international institutions and international law. It identifies a set of claims about women and peace that are typically made and considers these in light of women’s experience in the conflicts in Bougainville, East Timor and the Solomon Islands.
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  3. Sari Kouvo & Corey Levine (2008). Calling a Spade a Spade: Tackling the 'Women and Peace' Orthodoxy. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 16 (3):363-367.score: 73.0
    In her lecture, ‘Are women peaceful?’, Professor Hilary Charlesworth outlines what she perceives to be the current orthodoxies of the international women and conflict discourse. These include assumptions that women are natural peace-builders, suffer more from conflict, have a right to participate in peace processes, and that gender should be mainstreamed. Based on Charlesworth’s analysis, the authors argue that wars and peace processes are inherently gendered affairs and as a consequence a focus on equality (...)
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  4. Carol J. Adams (1994). Bringing Peace Home: A Feminist Philosophical Perspective on the Abuse of Women, Children, and Pet Animals. Hypatia 9 (2):63 - 84.score: 48.0
    In this essay, I connect the sexual victimization of women, children, and pet animals with the violence manifest in a patriarchal culture. After discussing these connections, I demonstrate the importance of taking seriously these connections because of their implications for conceptual analysis, epistemology, and political, environmental, and applied philosophy. My goal is to broaden our understanding of issues relevant to creating peace and to provide some suggestions about what must be included in any adequate feminist peace politics.
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  5. Susan Dion (1991). “The FBI Surveillance of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, 1945-1963”. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 3 (1):1-21.score: 39.0
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  6. Susan R. Grayzel (1990). Teaching Women's Peace Studies. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 2 (2):101-110.score: 39.0
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  7. Margi Hathi (2006). Women and World Peace. In Yajñeśvara Sadāśiva Śāstrī, Intaj Malek & Sunanda Y. Shastri (eds.), In Quest of Peace: Indian Culture Shows the Path. Bharatiya Kala Prakashan. 2--719.score: 39.0
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  8. Krishna Ahooja Patel (2006). Women's Perspectives on Culture of Global Peace. In Yajñeśvara Sadāśiva Śāstrī, Intaj Malek & Sunanda Y. Shastri (eds.), In Quest of Peace: Indian Culture Shows the Path. Bharatiya Kala Prakashan. 334.score: 39.0
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  9. Ralph Sandland (2009). Poetic Justice. Feminist Legal Studies 17 (2):219-228.score: 39.0
    This note examines the decision of the Court of Appeal in Tabernacle v Secretary of State for Defence (2009). The court held that byelaws prohibiting camping on Ministry of Defence land adjacent to the Atomic Weapons Establishment at Aldermaston, Berkshire violated the human rights of women peace protestors under Articles 10 and 11 European Convention on Human Rights. The note argues that this decision calls into question arguments recently made, that the association of women with peace (...)
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  10. Raksha Shah (2006). A Holistic Approach to Peace with Special Reference to Non-Violence and the Role of Women. In Yajñeśvara Sadāśiva Śāstrī, Intaj Malek & Sunanda Y. Shastri (eds.), In Quest of Peace: Indian Culture Shows the Path. Bharatiya Kala Prakashan. 2--510.score: 39.0
     
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  11. Carl Olson (2006). James L. Fitzgerald, Ed. And Trans., The Mahābhārata. Book 11: The Book of the Women; Book 12: The Book of Peace, Part One. [REVIEW] International Journal of Hindu Studies 10 (1):109-110.score: 36.0
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  12. W. G. Arnott, P. Dickinson, J. Moore, M. Jameson, D. Grene & L. R. Lind (1959). Aristophanes Against War: The Acharnians, The Peace, LysistrataSophocles: AjaxSophocles: The Women of TrachisSophocles: Electra and PhiloctetesTen Greek Plays in Contemporary Translations. Journal of Hellenic Studies 79:167.score: 36.0
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  13. M. -L. Kearney & A. H. Ronning (1997). Women and the University Curriculum: Towards Equality, Democracy and Peace. British Journal of Educational Studies 45:315-317.score: 36.0
     
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  14. Ernesto Laclau, Elihu Katz, Harry Kunneman & Serge Moscovici (2000). Peace History Society Conference—Politics of Peace Movements: From Nonviolence to Social Justice—28–30 April 2000—Western Foundation, Women's Studies and the Department of History at Western Washington University—Washington, United. [REVIEW] Ethical Perspectives 7 (1):73.score: 36.0
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  15. Phillip O'Brien (2011). Testimonies of Hiroshima and Nagasaki: Women Speak Out for Peace [Book Review]. Agora 46 (2):78.score: 36.0
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  16. Gillian Youngs (2008). Private Pain/Public Peace : Women's Rights as Human Rights and Amnesty International's Report on Violence Against Women. In Anna G. Jónasdóttir & Kathleen B. Jones (eds.), The Political Interests of Gender Revisited: Redoing Theory and Research with a Feminist Face. United Nations University Press.score: 36.0
  17. Jost Dülffer & Robert Frank (eds.) (2009). Peace, War and Gender From Antiquity to the Present: Cross-Cultural Perspectives. Klartext.score: 33.0
     
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  18. Sara Ruddick (1989/1990). Maternal Thinking: Towards a Politics of Peace. The Women's Press.score: 33.0
  19. Sri Mata Amritanandamayi Devi (2006). El despertar de la maternidad universal. Polis 14.score: 30.0
    En este texto se afirma la igualdad entre los hombres y mujeres, pues ambos poseen el mismo potencial infinito e inherente. La espiritualidad verdadera implica el autoconocimiento y consiste en realizar el poder de vida y de amar que existe potencialmente en todos nosotros. Es necesario superar toda forma de discriminación hacia las mujeres. La autora convoca a las mujeres a luchar por sus derechos, pues dice que están dormidas y deben despertar, cambiar su mente, redescubrir y valorar que representan (...)
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  20. Endre Begby (2010). Rawlsian Compromises in Peacebuilding? Response to Agafonow. Public Reason 2 (2):51-60.score: 27.0
    This paper responds to recent criticism from Alejandro Agafonow. In section I, I argue that the dilemma that Agafonow points to – while real – is in no way unique to liberal peacebuilding. Rather, it arises with respect to any foreign involvement in post-conflict reconstruction. I argue further that Agafonow’s proposal for handling this dilemma suffers from several shortcomings: first, it provides no sense of the magnitude and severity of the “oppressive practices” that peacebuilders should be willing to institutionalize. Second, (...)
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  21. Asgharali Engineer (2011). The Prophet of Non-Violence: Spirit of Peace, Compassion & Universality in Islam. Vitasta Pub..score: 27.0
    Section 1. Introduction. The prophet of non-violence -- section 2. Women in Islam. Women in the light of hadith -- Violence against women and religion -- section 3. War and peace in Islam. Theory of war and peace in Islam -- Centrality of jihad in post Qurʼanic period -- Jihad? But what about other verses in the Qurʼan? -- Islam, democracy and violence -- A critical look at Qurʼanic verses on war and violence -- section (...)
     
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  22. Kathryn Lockett (2008). The Mechanisms of Exclusion: Women in Conflict. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 16 (3):369-376.score: 27.0
    Women across geographical and temporal locations have faced similar experiences in conflict and post-conflict situations due to broad conceptualisations of gender and its perceived implications, which play out within all conflict dynamics. This article draws on case studies from the work of WOMANKIND Worldwide, a UK-based international women’s human rights and development organisation, to outline the challenges faced by and innovative strategies used by women’s organisations internationally to ensure their participation, voice and rights and the role of (...)
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  23. Drucilla Cornell (2004). Defending Ideals: War, Democracy, and Political Stuggles. Routledge.score: 24.0
    What is liberalism in the post-9/11 world? What do the ideals of civilization and civility mean during the Bush administration's campaigns in Afghanistan and Iraq? Is liberalism still important? Cornell examines the most important scholars of today and their approach to these questions. She contrasts Amartya Sen's capabilities approach with that of Martha Nussbaum, and examines Adorno's salvaging the idea of progress. She critiques Richard Falk's justification of the bombing of Afghanistan, which has now led to the slippery slope that (...)
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  24. Heather D. Macquarrie (2007). Ethics and the Role of Women in Transforming Violent Conflict. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 3:159-164.score: 24.0
    In October 2000, the UN Security Council unanimously adopted Resolution 1325 on "Women, Peace and Security", calling for women's full and equal participation in all aspects of conflict prevention, resolution and peacebuilding. The world is at last recognizing that gender issues and peace are inextricably connected, and that women's involvement in peace efforts is essential for the prevention of renewed conflict. Given the need for women's involvement in peace and security issues, we (...)
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  25. Maya J. Goldenberg (2010). Perspectives on Evidence-Based Healthcare for Women. Journal of Women's Health 19 (7):1235-1238.score: 21.0
    We live in an age of evidence-based healthcare, where the concept of evidence has been avidly and often uncritically embraced as a symbol of legitimacy, truth, and justice. By letting the evidence dictate healthcare decision making from the bedside to the policy level, the normative claims that inform decision making appear to be negotiated fairly—without subjectivity, prejudice, or bias. Thus, the term ‘‘evidence-based’’ is typically read in the health sciences as the empirically adequate standard of reasonable practice and a means (...)
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  26. Alison Bailey (1995). Mothering, Diversity and Peace: Comments on Sara Ruddick's Feminist Maternal Peace Politics. Journal of Social Philosophy 26 (1):162-182.score: 21.0
    Sara Ruddick's contemporary philosophical account of mothering reconsiders the maternal arguments used in the women's peace movements of the earlier part of this century. The culmination of this project is her 1989 book, Maternal Thinking: Toward a Politics of Peace. Ruddick's project is ground-breaking work in both academic philosophy and feminist theory. -/- In this chapter, I first look at the relationship between the two basic components of Ruddick's argument in Maternal Thinking: the "practicalist conception of truth" (...)
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  27. Karen J. Warren & Duane L. Cady (1994). Feminism and Peace: Seeing Connections. Hypatia 9 (2):4 - 20.score: 21.0
    In this essay we make visible the contribution of women even and especially when women cannot be added to mainstream, non-feminist accounts of peace. We argue that if feminism is taken seriously, then most philosophical discussions of peace must be updated, expanded and reconceived in ways which centralize feminist insights into the interrelationships among women, nature, peace, and war. We do so by discussing six ways that feminist scholarship informs mainstream philosophical discussions of (...). (shrink)
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  28. Alison Bailey (1994). Review: Mothering, Diversity, and Peace Politics. [REVIEW] Hypatia 9 (2):188 - 198.score: 21.0
    The most popular uniting theme in feminist peace literature grounds women's peace work in mothering. I argue if maternal arguments do not address the variety of relationships different races and classes of mothers have to institutional violence and/or the military, then the resulting peace politics can only draw incomplete conclusions about the relationships between maternal work/thinking and peace. To illustrate this I compare two models of mothering: Sara Ruddick's decription of "maternal practice" and Patricia Hill (...)
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  29. James P. Sterba (1994). Feminist Justice and the Pursuit of Peace. Hypatia 9 (2):173 - 187.score: 21.0
    I argue that the achievement of feminist justice is centrally related to the pursuit of peace, so that those who oppose violence in international arenas must, in consistency, oppose violence against women as well. This requires putting an end to the overt violence against women that takes the distinctive form of rape, battering, sexual harassment, and sexual abuse, and to the structural violence that takes the form of inequalities suffered by women in their families and in (...)
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  30. Deane Curtin (1995). Making Peace with the Earth: Indigenous Agriculture and the Green Revolution. Environmental Ethics 17 (1):59-73.score: 21.0
    Since its inception in the years following World War II, the green revolution has been defended, not just as a technical program designed to alleviate world hunger, but on moral grounds as a program to achieve world peace. In this paper, I dispute the moral claim to a politics of peace, arguing instead that the green revolution is warist in its treatment of the environment and indigenous communities, and that the agricultural practices that the green revolution was designed (...)
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  31. Batya Weinbaum (2010). Voices From the Kibbutz : Four Mothers, New Profile, and Women in Black. The European Legacy 15 (1):55-69.score: 21.0
    If there is any social organization that has provided a powerful illustration of the permeable boundaries between social politics—defined by Stephen M. Buechler as “forms of collective action that challenge power relations without an explicit focus on the state”—and social movements , and the role of collective identity in transforming either, as defined for women by Betty Friedan—it would be the Israeli kibbutz movement. The research presented here on grassroots Israeli women activists, a significant proportion of whom had (...)
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  32. Rogaia Mustafa Abusharaf (2006). Competing Masculinities: Probing Political Disputes as Acts of Violence Against Women From Southern Sudan and Darfur. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 7 (2):59-74.score: 21.0
    This article identifies the major forces militating against the promotion of women's rights in the Sudan. These factors are intimately linked to the country's multiple political disputes including Darfur and southern Sudan. The effects of political violence is elaborated through a detailed examination of women’s political, economic and cultural rights. The article concludes by identifying the promotion of good governance and democratization as fundamental pre-requisites for advancing human rights and sustainable peace in the war-torn nation.
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  33. Jennifer Corrin (2008). Ples Bilong Mere*: Law, Gender and Peace-Building in Solomon Islands. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 16 (Number 2, August 2008):169-194.score: 21.0
    This article discusses women and peace-building in Solomon Islands and the effect of law, theory and practical circumstances on their role. It looks at the place of Solomon Islands women in society historically, with particular reference to war and peace. It then analyses their current status from a legal perspective, looking at the existing Constitution, the proposed Federal Constitution, and relevant aspects of international law. It questions whether gender equity provisions are sufficient to promote participation at (...)
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  34. Paula Godoy-Paiz (2009). Women in Guatemala's Metropolitan Area: Violence, Law, and Social Justice. Studies in Social Justice 2 (1):27-47.score: 21.0
    In this article I examine the legal framework for addressing violence against women in post war Guatemala. Since the signing of the Peace Accords in 1996, judicial reform in Guatemala has included the passing of laws in the area of women‘s human rights, aimed at eliminating discrimination and violence against women. These laws constitute a response to and have occurred concurrently to an increase in violent crime against women, particularly in the form of mass rapes (...)
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  35. Fouzia Rhissassi (2006). Moroccan Womens Voices and the Violation of Peace Within the Institution of Marriage. In Yajñeśvara Sadāśiva Śāstrī, Intaj Malek & Sunanda Y. Shastri (eds.), In Quest of Peace: Indian Culture Shows the Path. Bharatiya Kala Prakashan. 1--33.score: 21.0
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  36. Leila J. Rupp (1997). Sexuality and Politics in the Early Twentieth Century: The Case of the International Women's Movement. Feminist Studies 23 (3).score: 21.0
    Three major transnational women's groups-the International Council of Women, the International Alliance of Women and the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom-are examined as they interacted on a regular basis in the years between the emergence of international organizing in the 1880s and the conclusion of WWII.
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  37. Toni Adleberg, Morgan Thompson & Eddy Nahmias (forthcoming). Do Men and Women Have Different Philosophical Intuitions? Further Data. Philosophical Psychology:1-27.score: 18.0
    To address the underrepresentation of women in philosophy effectively, we must understand the causes of the loss of women after their initial philosophy classes. In this paper we challenge one of the few explanations that has focused on why women might leave philosophy at early stages. Wesley Buckwalter and Stephen Stich (2014) offer some evidence that women have different intuitions than men about philosophical thought experiments. We present some concerns about their evidence and we discuss our (...)
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  38. Pauline Kleingeld (2004). Approaching Perpetual Peace: Kant’s Defence of a League of States and His Ideal of a World Federation. European Journal of Philosophy 12 (3):304-325.score: 18.0
    There exists a standard view of Kant’s position on global order and this view informs much of current Kantian political theory. This standard view is that Kant advocates a voluntary league of states and rejects the ideal of a federative state of states as dangerous, unrealistic, and conceptually incoherent. This standard interpretation is usually thought to fall victim to three equally standard objections. In this essay, I argue that the standard interpretation is mistaken and that the three standard objections miss (...)
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  39. Robert S. Taylor (2010). Kant's Political Religion: The Transparency of Perpetual Peace and the Highest Good. Review of Politics 72 (1):1-24.score: 18.0
    Scholars have long debated the relationship between Kant’s doctrine of right and his doctrine of virtue (including his moral religion or ethico-theology), which are the two branches of his moral philosophy. This article will examine the intimate connection in his practical philosophy between perpetual peace and the highest good, between political and ethico-religious communities, and between the types of transparency peculiar to each. It will show how domestic and international right provides a framework for the development of ethical communities, (...)
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  40. Beverly Dawn Metcalfe (2008). Women, Management and Globalization in the Middle East. Journal of Business Ethics 83 (1):85 - 100.score: 18.0
    This paper provides new theoretical insights into the interconnections and relationships between women, management and globalization in the Middle East (ME). The discussion is positioned within broader globalization debates about women’s social status in ME economies. Based on case study evidence and the UN datasets, the article critiques social, cultural and economic reasons for women’s limited advancement in the public sphere. These include the prevalence of the patriarchal work contract within public and private institutions, as well as (...)
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  41. Alison M. Jaggar (2002). Vulnerable Women and Neo-Liberal Globalization: Debt Burdens Undermine Women's Health in the Global South. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (6):425-440.score: 18.0
    Contemporary processes of globalization havebeen accompanied by a serious deterioration inthe health of many women across the world. Particularly disturbing is the drastic declinein the health status of many women in theglobal South, as well as some women in theglobal North. This paper argues that thehealth vulnerability of women in the globalSouth is inseparable from their political andeconomic vulnerability. More specifically, itlinks the deteriorating health of many Southernwomen with the neo-liberal economic policiesthat characterize contemporary economicglobalization and (...)
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  42. Myrtle P. Bell, Mary E. Mclaughlin & Jennifer M. Sequeira (2002). Discrimination, Harassment, and the Glass Ceiling: Women Executives as Change Agents. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 37 (1):65 - 76.score: 18.0
    In this article, we discuss the relationships between discrimination, harassment, and the glass ceiling, arguing that many of the factors that preclude women from occupying executive and managerial positions also foster sexual harassment. We suggest that measures designed to increase numbers of women in higher level positions will reduce sexual harassment. We first define and discuss discrimination, harassment, and the glass ceiling, relationships between each, and relevant legislation. We next discuss the relationships between gender and sexual harassment, emphasizing (...)
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  43. Zena Burgess & Phyllis Tharenou (2002). Women Board Directors: Characteristics of the Few. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 37 (1):39 - 49.score: 18.0
    Appointment as a director of a company board often represents the pinnacle of a management career. Worldwide, it has been noted that very few women are appointed to the boards of directors of companies. Blame for the low numbers of women of company boards can be partly attributed to the widely publicized "glass ceiling". However, the very low representation of women on company boards requires further examination. This article reviews the current state of women's representation on (...)
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  44. Charles Lawrence Allen (2007). Why Good People Make Bad Choices: How You Can Develop Peace of Mind Through Integrity. Loving Healing Press.score: 18.0
    The agenda -- The instinctual management of feeling -- The instinctual management of life -- Behind the scenes of choice -- Anger -- Going beyond ego -- Belief system components -- Conscious values -- Conscious morals -- Conscious expectations and self-image -- The conscious management of feelings -- Managing 'mad' -- Managing 'sad' -- Managing 'bad' -- Managing 'fear' -- Managing 'glad' -- Integrity : one choice at a time -- Nature meets nurture : the peace of mind perspective (...)
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  45. Jacqueline Broad (2002). Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    In this rich and detailed study of early modern women's thought, Jacqueline Broad explores the complexity of women's responses to Cartesian philosophy and its intellectual legacy in England and Europe. She examines the work of thinkers such as Mary Astell, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Margaret Cavendish, Anne Conway and Damaris Masham, who were active participants in the intellectual life of their time and were also the respected colleagues of philosophers such as Descartes, Leibniz and Locke. She also illuminates the (...)
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  46. Urszula Chowaniec & Marzenna Jakubczak (2012). Conceptualizing Generation and Transformation in Women’s Writing. ARGUMENT 2 (1):5-15.score: 18.0
    The main objective of this collection of papers is to explore ideas of generation and transformation in the context of postdependency discourse as it may be traced in women’s writing published in Bengali, Polish, Czech, Russian and English. As we believe, literature does not have merely a descriptive function or a purely visionary quality but serves also as a discursive medium, which is rhetorically sophisticated, imaginatively influential and stimulates cultural dynamics. It is an essential carrier of collective memory and (...)
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  47. Chong Ju Choi & Sae Won Kim (2008). Women and Globalization: Ethical Dimensions of Knowledge Transfer in Global Organizations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 81 (1):53 - 61.score: 18.0
    The topic of women and globalization raises fundamental questions on the impact of globalization on women, ethnic minorities and other socio-demographically under-represented actors in global organizations. This article seeks to integrate theories of procedural justice, psychological contracts, motivation and psychological ownership in knowledge transfer in global organizations, and the implications for women, and other under-represented actors. Our analysis concurs with current research on the need for a relativist perspective in business ethics research and one that encompasses the (...)
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  48. Christine Sylvester (1994). Feminist Theory and International Relations in a Postmodern Era. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    This book evaluates the major debates around which the discipline of international relations has developed in the light of contemporary feminist theories. The three debates (realist versus idealist, scientific versus traditional, modernist versus postmodernist) have been subject to feminist theorising since the earliest days of known feminist activities, with the current emphasis on feminist, empiricist standpoint and postmodernist ways of knowing. Christine Sylvester shows how feminist theorising could have affected our understanding of international relations had it been included in the (...)
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  49. Sohail H. Hashmi (2010). The Rights of Muslim Women: A Comment on Irene Oh's the Rights of God. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (3):588-593.score: 18.0
    This review of Irene Oh's The Rights of God focuses on women's rights in Islamic theory and practice. Oh suggests that religious establishments, and the texts they disseminate, often press believers to recognize and reject social problems, such as racial and gender discrimination. Islamic scholars and texts have played a more ambiguous role in efforts to recognize women's rights within Muslim states. Modernist intellectuals have used Islamic texts to support the advancement of women's rights, but members of (...)
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  50. Toby Schonfeld (2013). The Perils of Protection: Vulnerability and Women in Clinical Research. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (3):189-206.score: 18.0
    Subpart B of 45 Code of Federal Regulations Part 46 (CFR) identifies the criteria according to which research involving pregnant women, human fetuses, and neonates can be conducted ethically in the United States. As such, pregnant women and fetuses fall into a category requiring “additional protections,” often referred to as “vulnerable populations.” The CFR does not define vulnerability, but merely gives examples of vulnerable groups by pointing to different categories of potential research subjects needing additional protections. In this (...)
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