Search results for 'Women and peace' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  9
    Hilary Charlesworth (2008). Are Women Peaceful? Reflections on the Role of Women in Peace-Building. Feminist Legal Studies 16 (3):347-361.
    This paper examines the way that women’s relationship to peace is constructed in international institutions and international law. It identifies a set of claims about women and peace that are typically made and considers these in light of women’s experience in the conflicts in Bougainville, East Timor and the Solomon Islands.
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  2.  4
    Sari Kouvo & Corey Levine (2008). Calling a Spade a Spade: Tackling the 'Women and Peace' Orthodoxy. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 16 (3):363-367.
    In her lecture, ‘Are women peaceful?’, Professor Hilary Charlesworth outlines what she perceives to be the current orthodoxies of the international women and conflict discourse. These include assumptions that women are natural peace-builders, suffer more from conflict, have a right to participate in peace processes, and that gender should be mainstreamed. Based on Charlesworth’s analysis, the authors argue that wars and peace processes are inherently gendered affairs and as a consequence a focus on equality (...)
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  3. Ingeborg Breines, Dorota Gierycz, Betty Reardon, Unesco & United Nations (1999). Towards a Women's Agenda for a Culture of Peace.
     
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  4.  18
    Carol J. Adams (1994). Bringing Peace Home: A Feminist Philosophical Perspective on the Abuse of Women, Children, and Pet Animals. Hypatia 9 (2):63 - 84.
    In this essay, I connect the sexual victimization of women, children, and pet animals with the violence manifest in a patriarchal culture. After discussing these connections, I demonstrate the importance of taking seriously these connections because of their implications for conceptual analysis, epistemology, and political, environmental, and applied philosophy. My goal is to broaden our understanding of issues relevant to creating peace and to provide some suggestions about what must be included in any adequate feminist peace politics.
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  5.  9
    Susan Dion (1991). “The FBI Surveillance of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, 1945-1963”. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 3 (1):1-21.
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  6.  4
    Susan R. Grayzel (1990). Teaching Women's Peace Studies. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 2 (2):101-110.
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  7. Margi Hathi (2006). Women and World Peace. In Yajñeśvara Sadāśiva Śāstrī, Intaj Malek & Sunanda Y. Shastri (eds.), In Quest of Peace: Indian Culture Shows the Path. Bharatiya Kala Prakashan 2--719.
     
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  8. Krishna Ahooja Patel (2006). Women's Perspectives on Culture of Global Peace. In Yajñeśvara Sadāśiva Śāstrī, Intaj Malek & Sunanda Y. Shastri (eds.), In Quest of Peace: Indian Culture Shows the Path. Bharatiya Kala Prakashan 334.
     
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  9. Raksha Shah (2006). A Holistic Approach to Peace with Special Reference to Non-Violence and the Role of Women. In Yajñeśvara Sadāśiva Śāstrī, Intaj Malek & Sunanda Y. Shastri (eds.), In Quest of Peace: Indian Culture Shows the Path. Bharatiya Kala Prakashan 2--510.
     
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  10.  6
    Wendy Lambourne & Vivianna Rodriguez Carreon (forthcoming). Engendering Transitional Justice: A Transformative Approach to Building Peace and Attaining Human Rights for Women. Human Rights Review.
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  11.  7
    Carl Olson (2006). James L. Fitzgerald, Ed. And Trans., The Mahābhārata. Book 11: The Book of the Women; Book 12: The Book of Peace, Part One. [REVIEW] International Journal of Hindu Studies 10 (1):109-110.
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  12.  1
    Phillip O'Brien (2011). Testimonies of Hiroshima and Nagasaki: Women Speak Out for Peace [Book Review]. Agora 46 (2):78.
  13.  2
    W. G. Arnott, P. Dickinson, J. Moore, M. Jameson, D. Grene & L. R. Lind (1959). Aristophanes Against War: The Acharnians, The Peace, LysistrataSophocles: AjaxSophocles: The Women of TrachisSophocles: Electra and PhiloctetesTen Greek Plays in Contemporary Translations. Journal of Hellenic Studies 79:167.
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  14. M. -L. Kearney & A. H. Ronning (1997). Women and the University Curriculum: Towards Equality, Democracy and Peace. British Journal of Educational Studies 45 (3):315-317.
     
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  15. Ernesto Laclau, Elihu Katz, Harry Kunneman & Serge Moscovici (2000). Peace History Society Conference—Politics of Peace Movements: From Nonviolence to Social Justice—28–30 April 2000—Western Foundation, Women's Studies and the Department of History at Western Washington University—Washington, United. [REVIEW] Ethical Perspectives 7 (1):73.
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  16. Agnes Shackleton (1963). Continuous Mediation: The Women's International League for Peace and Freedom. New Blackfriars 44 (519):382-384.
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  17. Angela West (1986). The Greenham Vigil: A Women's Theological Initiative for Peace. New Blackfriars 67 (789):125-137.
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  18. Gillian Youngs (2008). Private Pain/Public Peace : Women's Rights as Human Rights and Amnesty International's Report on Violence Against Women. In Anna G. Jónasdóttir & Kathleen B. Jones (eds.), The Political Interests of Gender Revisited: Redoing Theory and Research with a Feminist Face. United Nations University Press
  19.  16
    Sara Ruddick (1989). Maternal Thinking: Towards a Politics of Peace. The Women's Press.
    The most popular uniting theme in feminist peace literature grounds women's peace work in mothering. I argue if maternal arguments do not address the variety of relationships different races and classes of mothers have to institutional violence and/or the military, then the resulting peace politics can only draw incomplete conclusions about the relationships between maternal work/thinking and peace. To illustrate this I compare two models of mothering: Sara Ruddick's decription of "maternal practice" and Patricia Hill (...)
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  20.  3
    Karen J. Warren & Duane L. Cady (eds.) (1996). Bringing Peace Home: Feminism, Violence, and Nature. Indiana University Press.
    "This collection of works is ambitious, well documented, thoroughly—though not turgidly—referenced, and comprehensively indexed.
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  21.  1
    Ralph Sandland (2009). Poetic Justice. Feminist Legal Studies 17 (2):219-228.
    This note examines the decision of the Court of Appeal in Tabernacle v Secretary of State for Defence (2009). The court held that byelaws prohibiting camping on Ministry of Defence land adjacent to the Atomic Weapons Establishment at Aldermaston, Berkshire violated the human rights of women peace protestors under Articles 10 and 11 European Convention on Human Rights. The note argues that this decision calls into question arguments recently made, that the association of women with peace (...)
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  22. Jost Dülffer & Robert Frank (eds.) (2009). Peace, War and Gender From Antiquity to the Present: Cross-Cultural Perspectives. Klartext.
     
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  23. Sara Ruddick (1995). Maternal Thinking Toward a Politics of Peace ; with a New Preface.
     
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  24.  10
    Alison Bailey (1994). Mothering, Diversity, and Peace Politics. Hypatia 9 (2):188-198.
    The most popular uniting theme in feminist peace literature grounds women's peace work in mothering. I argue if maternal arguments do not address the variety of relationships different races and classes of mothers have to institutional violence and/or the military, then the resulting peace politics can only draw incomplete conclusions about the relationships between maternal work/thinking and peace. To illustrate this I compare two models of mothering: Sara Ruddick's decription of "maternal practice" and Patricia Hill (...)
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  25.  1
    Kathryn Lockett (2008). The Mechanisms of Exclusion: Women in Conflict. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 16 (3):369-376.
    Women across geographical and temporal locations have faced similar experiences in conflict and post-conflict situations due to broad conceptualisations of gender and its perceived implications, which play out within all conflict dynamics. This article draws on case studies from the work of WOMANKIND Worldwide, a UK-based international women’s human rights and development organisation, to outline the challenges faced by and innovative strategies used by women’s organisations internationally to ensure their participation, voice and rights and the role of (...)
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  26. Alison Bailey (1993). Mothers, Birthgivers, and Peacemakers: The Problem of Maternal Thinking in Feminist Peace Politics. Dissertation, University of Cincinnati
    Sara Ruddick's Maternal Thinking: Towards a Politics of Peace is both an anomaly and a product of the tradition associating maternal activities with peace. Ruddick argues that maternal work gives mothers distinct motives for rejecting war, unique abilities for nonviolent conflict resolution, and a critical perspective on military thinking. If she is correct, maternal thinking may provide the foundation for a feminist peace politics. My project is a critical account of maternal thinking as Ruddick unfolds it in (...)
     
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  27. Asgharali Engineer (2011). The Prophet of Non-Violence: Spirit of Peace, Compassion & Universality in Islam. Vitasta Pub..
    Section 1. Introduction. The prophet of non-violence -- section 2. Women in Islam. Women in the light of hadith -- Violence against women and religion -- section 3. War and peace in Islam. Theory of war and peace in Islam -- Centrality of jihad in post Qurʼanic period -- Jihad? But what about other verses in the Qurʼan? -- Islam, democracy and violence -- A critical look at Qurʼanic verses on war and violence -- section (...)
     
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  28.  12
    Heather D. Macquarrie (2007). Ethics and the Role of Women in Transforming Violent Conflict. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 3:159-164.
    In October 2000, the UN Security Council unanimously adopted Resolution 1325 on "Women, Peace and Security", calling for women's full and equal participation in all aspects of conflict prevention, resolution and peacebuilding. The world is at last recognizing that gender issues and peace are inextricably connected, and that women's involvement in peace efforts is essential for the prevention of renewed conflict. Given the need for women's involvement in peace and security issues, we (...)
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  29.  4
    Sri Mata Amritanandamayi Devi (2006). El despertar de la maternidad universal. Polis 14.
    En este texto se afirma la igualdad entre los hombres y mujeres, pues ambos poseen el mismo potencial infinito e inherente. La espiritualidad verdadera implica el autoconocimiento y consiste en realizar el poder de vida y de amar que existe potencialmente en todos nosotros. Es necesario superar toda forma de discriminación hacia las mujeres. La autora convoca a las mujeres a luchar por sus derechos, pues dice que están dormidas y deben despertar, cambiar su mente, redescubrir y valorar que representan (...)
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  30.  34
    Endre Begby (2010). Rawlsian Compromises in Peacebuilding? Response to Agafonow. Public Reason 2 (2):51-60.
    This paper responds to recent criticism from Alejandro Agafonow. In section I, I argue that the dilemma that Agafonow points to – while real – is in no way unique to liberal peacebuilding. Rather, it arises with respect to any foreign involvement in post-conflict reconstruction. I argue further that Agafonow’s proposal for handling this dilemma suffers from several shortcomings: first, it provides no sense of the magnitude and severity of the “oppressive practices” that peacebuilders should be willing to institutionalize. Second, (...)
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  31.  18
    Rogaia Mustafa Abusharaf (2006). Competing Masculinities: Probing Political Disputes as Acts of Violence Against Women From Southern Sudan and Darfur. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 7 (2):59-74.
    This article identifies the major forces militating against the promotion of women's rights in the Sudan. These factors are intimately linked to the country's multiple political disputes including Darfur and southern Sudan. The effects of political violence is elaborated through a detailed examination of women’s political, economic and cultural rights. The article concludes by identifying the promotion of good governance and democratization as fundamental pre-requisites for advancing human rights and sustainable peace in the war-torn nation.
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  32.  38
    Alison Bailey (1994). Mothering, Diversity and Peace: Comments on Sara Ruddick's Feminist Maternal Peace Politics. Journal of Social Philosophy 26 (1):162-182.
    Sara Ruddick's contemporary philosophical account of mothering reconsiders the maternal arguments used in the women's peace movements of the earlier part of this century. The culmination of this project is her 1989 book, Maternal Thinking: Toward a Politics of Peace. Ruddick's project is ground-breaking work in both academic philosophy and feminist theory. -/- In this chapter, I first look at the relationship between the two basic components of Ruddick's argument in Maternal Thinking: the "practicalist conception of truth" (...)
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  33.  3
    Jennifer Corrin (2008). Ples Bilong Mere*: Law, Gender and Peace-Building in Solomon Islands. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 16 (Number 2, August 2008):169-194.
    This article discusses women and peace-building in Solomon Islands and the effect of law, theory and practical circumstances on their role. It looks at the place of Solomon Islands women in society historically, with particular reference to war and peace. It then analyses their current status from a legal perspective, looking at the existing Constitution, the proposed Federal Constitution, and relevant aspects of international law. It questions whether gender equity provisions are sufficient to promote participation at (...)
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  34.  26
    Karen J. Warren & Duane L. Cady (1994). Feminism and Peace: Seeing Connections. Hypatia 9 (2):4 - 20.
    In this essay we make visible the contribution of women even and especially when women cannot be added to mainstream, non-feminist accounts of peace. We argue that if feminism is taken seriously, then most philosophical discussions of peace must be updated, expanded and reconceived in ways which centralize feminist insights into the interrelationships among women, nature, peace, and war. We do so by discussing six ways that feminist scholarship informs mainstream philosophical discussions of (...). (shrink)
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  35.  17
    Deane Curtin (1995). Making Peace with the Earth: Indigenous Agriculture and the Green Revolution. Environmental Ethics 17 (1):59-73.
    Since its inception in the years following World War II, the green revolution has been defended, not just as a technical program designed to alleviate world hunger, but on moral grounds as a program to achieve world peace. In this paper, I dispute the moral claim to a politics of peace, arguing instead that the green revolution is warist in its treatment of the environment and indigenous communities, and that the agricultural practices that the green revolution was designed (...)
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  36.  12
    Leila J. Rupp (1997). Sexuality and Politics in the Early Twentieth Century: The Case of the International Women's Movement. Feminist Studies 23 (3).
    Three major transnational women's groups-the International Council of Women, the International Alliance of Women and the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom-are examined as they interacted on a regular basis in the years between the emergence of international organizing in the 1880s and the conclusion of WWII.
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  37.  8
    Paula Godoy-Paiz (2009). Women in Guatemala's Metropolitan Area: Violence, Law, and Social Justice. Studies in Social Justice 2 (1):27-47.
    In this article I examine the legal framework for addressing violence against women in post war Guatemala. Since the signing of the Peace Accords in 1996, judicial reform in Guatemala has included the passing of laws in the area of women‘s human rights, aimed at eliminating discrimination and violence against women. These laws constitute a response to and have occurred concurrently to an increase in violent crime against women, particularly in the form of mass rapes (...)
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  38.  11
    James P. Sterba (1994). Feminist Justice and the Pursuit of Peace. Hypatia 9 (2):173 - 187.
    I argue that the achievement of feminist justice is centrally related to the pursuit of peace, so that those who oppose violence in international arenas must, in consistency, oppose violence against women as well. This requires putting an end to the overt violence against women that takes the distinctive form of rape, battering, sexual harassment, and sexual abuse, and to the structural violence that takes the form of inequalities suffered by women in their families and in (...)
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  39.  10
    Alison Bailey (1994). Review: Mothering, Diversity, and Peace Politics. [REVIEW] Hypatia 9 (2):188 - 198.
    The most popular uniting theme in feminist peace literature grounds women's peace work in mothering. I argue if maternal arguments do not address the variety of relationships different races and classes of mothers have to institutional violence and/or the military, then the resulting peace politics can only draw incomplete conclusions about the relationships between maternal work/thinking and peace. To illustrate this I compare two models of mothering: Sara Ruddick's decription of "maternal practice" and Patricia Hill (...)
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  40.  8
    Batya Weinbaum (2010). Voices From the Kibbutz : Four Mothers, New Profile, and Women in Black. The European Legacy 15 (1):55-69.
    If there is any social organization that has provided a powerful illustration of the permeable boundaries between social politics—defined by Stephen M. Buechler as “forms of collective action that challenge power relations without an explicit focus on the state”—and social movements , and the role of collective identity in transforming either, as defined for women by Betty Friedan—it would be the Israeli kibbutz movement. The research presented here on grassroots Israeli women activists, a significant proportion of whom had (...)
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  41.  18
    Drucilla Cornell (2004). Defending Ideals: War, Democracy, and Political Stuggles. Routledge.
    What is liberalism in the post-9/11 world? What do the ideals of civilization and civility mean during the Bush administration's campaigns in Afghanistan and Iraq? Is liberalism still important? Cornell examines the most important scholars of today and their approach to these questions. She contrasts Amartya Sen's capabilities approach with that of Martha Nussbaum, and examines Adorno's salvaging the idea of progress. She critiques Richard Falk's justification of the bombing of Afghanistan, which has now led to the slippery slope that (...)
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  42.  50
    Christine Sylvester (1994). Feminist Theory and International Relations in a Postmodern Era. Cambridge University Press.
    This book evaluates the major debates around which the discipline of international relations has developed in the light of contemporary feminist theories. The three debates (realist versus idealist, scientific versus traditional, modernist versus postmodernist) have been subject to feminist theorising since the earliest days of known feminist activities, with the current emphasis on feminist, empiricist standpoint and postmodernist ways of knowing. Christine Sylvester shows how feminist theorising could have affected our understanding of international relations had it been included in the (...)
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  43.  12
    Laurie Calhoun (2012). Ann Jones, War is Not Over When It's Over: Women Speak Out From the Ruins of War. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 21 (2):97-102.
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  44.  11
    Bidisha Kumar (2012). Kwok Pui-Lan (Ed), Hope Abundant: Third World and Indigenous Women's Theology. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 22 (1):157-160.
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  45.  16
    Rosemarie Tong (1992). Blessed Are the Peacemakers: Commentary on Making Peace in Gestational Conflicts. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 13 (4).
    The purpose of this commentary on James Nelson's article [1] is to advocate introducing the ethics of care into the arena of gestational conflict. Too often the debate gets stalled in a maternal versus fetal rights headlock. Interventionists stress fetal over maternal rights: they believe education, post-birth prosecution or pre-birth seizure of pregnant women may be permissible. In contrast to interventionists, other philosophers stress that favoring fetal rights treats women like fetal containers. I question whether we should really (...)
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  46.  4
    Nadine Foley (1991). The Prophetic Role of Women in Evangelization. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 4 (2):165-178.
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  47.  6
    Arthur F. McGovern (1990). Women in Latin American Liberation Theology. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 2 (1):39-48.
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  48.  11
    James Lindemann Nelson (1992). Making Peace in Gestational Conflicts. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 13 (4).
    Mary Anne Warren's claim that there is room for only one person with full and equal rights inside a single human skin ([1], p. 63) calls attention to the vast range of moral conflict engendered by assigning full basic moral rights to fetuses. Thereby, it serves as a goad to thinking about conflicts between pregnant women and their fetuses in a way that emphasizes relationships rather than rights. I sketch out what a care orientation might suggest about resolving gestational (...)
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  49.  4
    Nancy S. Barrett (1989). Social Justice for Poor Women. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 1 (2):1-15.
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  50.  4
    Chinyere Ukpokolo (2011). Gender, Symbols and Traditional Peacemaking Among the Nanka-Igbo of South-Eastern Nigeria. Human Affairs 21 (2):163-183.
    The class condition of women in contemporary Igbo society in particular and Africa in general, which is characterized by her peripherialization in the scheme of state building and knowledge production, has led to the need for the re-examination of her representation in specific cultural contexts in Africa prior to the major historical events in the continent. There is no doubt that the partition and colonization of Africa led to a pragmatic shift in local paradigms, and the significance placed on (...)
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