Search results for 'Women and psychoanalysis Congresses' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Richard Feldstein & Judith Roof (eds.) (1989). Feminism and Psychoanalysis. Cornell University Press.score: 219.0
     
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  2. Teresa Brennan (ed.) (1989). Between Feminism and Psychoanalysis. Routledge.score: 207.0
    In this landmark collection of original essays, outstanding feminist critics in Britain, France, and the United States present new perspectives on feminism and ...
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  3. Representing Women (1994). Racism in Pornography and the Women's Movement. In Alison M. Jaggar (ed.), Living with Contradictions: Controversies in Feminist Social Ethics. Westview Press. 171.score: 180.0
  4. Gillian Clark (1990). Metaphors of the Female Body Page du Bois: Sowing the Body: Psychoanalysis and Ancient Representations of Women. (Women in Culture and Society.) Pp. Xv + 227; 13 Illustrations. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1988. £23.95. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 40 (01):124-125.score: 120.0
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  5. Louise Gyler (2010). The Gendered Unconscious: Can Gender Discourses Subvert Psychoanalysis? Routledge.score: 102.0
    This book investigates the nature of Feminist interventions in psychoanalysis by comparing the status and treatment of women in two different psychoanalytic ...
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  6. Sonu Shamdasani & Michael Münchow (eds.) (1994). Speculations After Freud: Psychoanalysis, Philosophy, and Culture. Routledge.score: 92.0
    Speculations After Freud confronts the dilemmas of contemporary psychoanalysis by bringing together some of the most influential and best known writers on psychoanalysis and culture. These advocates and critics of psychoanalysis, both institutional and theoretical, reveal the powerful role psychoanalytic speculation plays in all areas of culture. Psychoanalysis has played a pivotal role in challenging the modernist notions of rationality and selfhood. It offers an alternative means of examining how identity is engendered, yet its identity has (...)
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  7. Jean Walton (2001). Fair Sex, Savage Dreams: Race, Psychoanalysis, Sexual Difference. Duke University Press.score: 84.0
    "In this groundbreaking book Jean Walton subjects psychoanalysis to a sustained and highly illuminating ethnographic critique.
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  8. Eva Feder Kittay & Diana T. Meyers (eds.) (1987). Women and Moral Theory. Rowman & Littlefield.score: 84.0
     
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  9. Slavoj Žižek (2005). The Metastases of Enjoyment: Six Essays on Women and Causality. Verso.score: 78.0
    The experience of the Yugoslav war and the rise of "irrational" violence in contemporary societies provides the theoretical and political context of this book, ...
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  10. James Donald (ed.) (1991). Psychoanalysis and Cultural Theory: Thresholds. St. Martin's Press.score: 78.0
  11. Maja E. Pellikaan-Engel (ed.) (1992). Against Patriarchal Thinking: Proceedings of the Vith Symposium of the International Association of Women Philosophers (Iaph) 1992. Vu University Press.score: 78.0
  12. Rosalind Minsky (1996). Psychoanalysis and Gender: An Introductory Reader. Routledge.score: 66.0
    What is object-relations theory and what does it have to do with literary studies? How can Freud's phallocentric theories be applied by feminist critics? In Psychoanalysis and Gender: An Introductory Reader Rosalind Minsky answers these questions and more, offering students a clear, straightforward overview without ever losing them in jargon. In the first section Minsky outlines the fundamentals of the theory, introducing the key thinkers and providing clear commentary. In the second section, the theory is demonstratedn by an anthology (...)
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  13. Elaine Hoffman Baruch (1996). She Speaks/He Listens: Women on the French Analyst's Couch. Routledge.score: 66.0
    Although much attention has been given to Jacques Lacan in his rereading of Freud and to French women analysts in their deconstruction of traditional psychoanalysis, little has been available in the US on contemporary male French analysts and their treatment of women. She Speaks/He Listens illustrates the range of thought among some well-known French male psychoanalysts today--from Lacanians to anti-Lacanians to eclectics--with regard to women and sexual difference. Through the interview format, with its possibilities for surprise (...)
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  14. Ann Pellegrini (1997). Performance Anxieties: Staging Psychoanalysis, Staging Race. Routledge.score: 66.0
    Performance Anxieties looks at the on-going debates over the value of psychoanalysis for feminist theory and politics--specifically concerning the social and psychical meanings of racialization. Beginning with an historicized return to Freud and the meaning of Jewishness in Freud's day, Ann Pellegrini indicates how "race" and racialization are not incidental features of psychoanalysis or of modern subjectivity, but are among the generative conditions of both. Performance Anxieties stages a series of playful encounters between elite and popular performance texts--Freud (...)
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  15. Jacques J. Rozenberg (ed.) (1996). Sense and Nonsense: Philosophical, Clinical, and Ethical Perspectives. Hebrew University.score: 56.0
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  16. Carol Mastrangelo Bové (2013). Kristeva's Thérèse: Mysticism and Modernism. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 21 (1):105-115.score: 54.0
    This essay focuses on Julia Kristeva’s recent volume Thérèse mon amour: Sainte Thérèse d’Avila (2008) , describing and placing this blend of novel, play, psychoanalytic cultural theory, and case history in the context of her work. I argue that the volume contributes to an understanding of religion’s impact—especially Catholic mysticism--on Western categories of women. I address in particular Thérèse ’s mysticism and modernist use of a feminine figure to subvert practices threatening the vitality of the psyche and of social (...)
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  17. Cynthia Burack (2004). Healing Identities: Black Feminist Thought and the Politics of Groups. Cornell University Press.score: 54.0
    Psychoanalysis, race, and racism -- From psychoanalysis to political theory -- Reparative group leadership -- Conflict and authenticity -- Bonding and solidarity -- Coalitions and reparative politics.
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  18. Christina Howells (ed.) (2004). French Women Philosophers: A Contemporary Reader. Routledge.score: 54.0
    This reader is the first of its kind to present the work of leading French women philosophers to an English-speaking audience. Many of the articles appear for the first time in English and have been specially translated for the collection. Christina Howells draws on major areas of philosophical and theoretical debate including Ethics, Psychoanalysis, Law, Politics, History, Science and Rationality. Each section and article is clearly introduced and situated in its intellectual context. The book is necessarily feminist in (...)
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  19. Christina Howells (ed.) (2004). French Women Philosophers: A Contemporary Reader: Subjectivity, Identity, Alterity. Routledge.score: 54.0
    This reader is the first of its kind to present the work of leading French women philosophers to an English-speaking audience. Howells draws on several major areas of philosophical and theoretical debate including Ethics, Psychoanalysis, Law, Politics, History, Science, and Rationality. The philosophers include some names already well-known in North American such as Kristeva, Irigaray, Cixous, and Kofman, but also many others celebrated in France but whose innovative work has not yet achieved such widespread recognition in the English-speaking (...)
     
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  20. Elisabeth Roudinesco (2009). Our Dark Side: A History of Perversion. Polity.score: 48.0
    The sublime and the abject -- Sade pro and contra Sade -- Dark enlightenment or barbaric science -- The Auschwitz confessions -- The perverse society.
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  21. Paul R. Gross, N. Levitt & Martin W. Lewis (eds.) (1996). The Flight From Science and Reason. The New York Academy of Sciences.score: 48.0
  22. Admiel Kosman (2012). Gender and Dialogue in the Rabbinic Prism. De Gruyter.score: 48.0
     
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  23. Qing Dai (1996). My Participation in the 6th Congress of the All-China-Womens-Federation. Chinese Studies in Philosophy 27 (2):50-59.score: 40.0
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  24. Renata Schlesier (1984). On the Alleged Demise of Vaginal Sexuality: A Mournful Account of the Relationship Between Psychoanalysis and Feminism. Telos 1984 (59):101-118.score: 36.0
    Is there vaginal orgasm or not? This question and the answers it has evoked have caused considerable confusion. The debate involves instincts and erogenic zones as well as the potential of female sexuality. At stake is not only the determination of the decisive erogenic zone in female sexuality but also, the extent to which female sexuality is susceptible to repression, the relation between social repression and the repression of sexuality, the specific understanding by women of their own needs and (...)
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  25. Sonya Charles (2011). Obstetricians and Violence Against Women. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (12):51-56.score: 30.0
    I argue that the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), as an organization and through its individual members, can and should be a far greater ally in the prevention of violence against women. Specifically, I argue that we need to pay attention to obstetrical practices that inadvertently contribute to the problem of violence against women. While intimate partner violence is a complex phenomenon, I focus on the coercive control of women and adherence to oppressive gender norms. (...)
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  26. Anne G. Rosenwald (2011). Beyond Bias and Barriers: Fulfilling the Potential of Women in Academic Science and Engineering. BioScience 61 (10):823-825.score: 30.0
    The United States economy relies on the productivity, entrepreneurship, and creativity of its people. To maintain its scientific and engineering leadership amid increasing economic and educational globalization, the United States must aggressively pursue the innovative capacity of all its people—women and men. However, women face barriers to success in every field of science and engineering; obstacles that deprive the country of an important source of talent. Without a transformation of academic institutions to tackle such barriers, the future vitality (...)
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  27. Jim Hopkins (forthcoming). The Significance of Consilience: Psychoanalysis, Attachment, Neuroscience, and Evolution. In L. Brakel & V. Talvete (eds.), Psychoanalysis and Philosophy of Mind: Unconscious mentality in the 21st century. Karnac.score: 27.0
    This paper considers clinical psychoanalysis together with developmental psychology (particularly attachment theory), evolution, and neuroscience in the context a Bayesian account of confirmation and disconfrimation. -/- In it I argue that these converging sources of support indicate that the combination of relatively low predictive power and broad explanatory scope that characterise the theories of both Freud and Darwin suggest that Freud's theory, like Darwin's, may strike deeply into natural phenomena. -/- The same argument, however, suggests that conclusive confirmation for (...)
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  28. Maya J. Goldenberg (2010). Perspectives on Evidence-Based Healthcare for Women. Journal of Women's Health 19 (7):1235-1238.score: 27.0
    We live in an age of evidence-based healthcare, where the concept of evidence has been avidly and often uncritically embraced as a symbol of legitimacy, truth, and justice. By letting the evidence dictate healthcare decision making from the bedside to the policy level, the normative claims that inform decision making appear to be negotiated fairly—without subjectivity, prejudice, or bias. Thus, the term ‘‘evidence-based’’ is typically read in the health sciences as the empirically adequate standard of reasonable practice and a means (...)
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  29. Speranta Dumitru (2014). From 'Brain Drain' to 'Care Drain': Women's Labor Migration and Methodological Sexism. Women's Studies International Forum 47:203-212.score: 27.0
    The metaphor of “care drain” has been created as a womanly parallel to the “brain drain” idea. Just as “brain drain” suggests that the skilled migrants are an economic loss for the sending country, “care drain” describes the migrant women hired as care workers as a loss of care for their children left behind. This paper criticizes the construction of migrant women as “care drain” for three reasons: 1) it is built on sexist stereotypes, 2) it misrepresents and (...)
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  30. Maria Borges (2008). Kant on Women and Emotion. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 25:13-19.score: 26.0
    Kant has often been criticized for holding a very negative vision of women, according to which they are less rational and less morally valuable than men. In this paper, I shall argue quite the opposite. I will show that, in spite of some minor pejorative comments, Kant held that women fit better the ideal of a moral person than men. This is due to some qualities of the female sex, mainly the women capacity for self-control and the (...)
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  31. Kaija Rossi (2007). Is Multiculturalism Bad for Women? The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 3:165-170.score: 26.0
    In my paper, I will argue that in the liberal tradition of thinking, illiberal practices of minority groups cannot be supported without interventions that already liberalize illiberal cultures. For example, positive group rights have to be evaluated in ways that demand democratization. Moreover, nonintervention with conditions, such as the right of exit, will fail to be noninterventive if taken seriously because illiberal treatment of individuals diminishes their ability to actualize their rights of exit. In addition, nonintervention as a basis of (...)
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  32. Ok-Soong Cha (2008). The Philosophy of Women, See-al and Life of Haam, Seok Heon. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:1117-1121.score: 26.0
    This thesis reviews Haam Seok Heon‘s See-al philosophy, the main philosophy about life in terms of women. The See-al philosophy was created by Haam, who went through the turbulent times of Korea. So far, we have had papers that dealt with his philosophy under the political, historical and religious contexts, but there has been no paper focused on women. Actually, Haam confessed that it was his mother who structured the foundation of his philosophy. He also said that he (...)
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  33. Heather D. Macquarrie (2007). Ethics and the Role of Women in Transforming Violent Conflict. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 3:159-164.score: 26.0
    In October 2000, the UN Security Council unanimously adopted Resolution 1325 on "Women, Peace and Security", calling for women's full and equal participation in all aspects of conflict prevention, resolution and peacebuilding. The world is at last recognizing that gender issues and peace are inextricably connected, and that women's involvement in peace efforts is essential for the prevention of renewed conflict. Given the need for women's involvement in peace and security issues, we must address the reasons (...)
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  34. Toni Adleberg, Morgan Thompson & Eddy Nahmias (forthcoming). Do Men and Women Have Different Philosophical Intuitions? Further Data. Philosophical Psychology:1-27.score: 24.0
    To address the underrepresentation of women in philosophy effectively, we must understand the causes of the loss of women after their initial philosophy classes. In this paper we challenge one of the few explanations that has focused on why women might leave philosophy at early stages. Wesley Buckwalter and Stephen Stich (2014) offer some evidence that women have different intuitions than men about philosophical thought experiments. We present some concerns about their evidence and we discuss our (...)
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  35. David Sibley (1995). Geographies of Exclusion: Society and Difference in the West. Burns & Oates.score: 24.0
    Geographies of Exclusion identifies forms of social and spatial exclusion and subsequently examines the fate of knowledge of space and society which has been produced by members of excluded groups. Evaluating writing on urban society by women and black writers, David Sibley asks why such work is neglected by the academic establishment, suggesting that both the practices which result in the exclusion of minorities and those which result in the exclusion of knowledge have important implications for theory and method (...)
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  36. Chris Beasley (1999). What is Feminism?: An Introduction to Feminist Theory. Sage.score: 24.0
    So what is feminism anyway? Why are all the experts so reluctant to give us a clear definition? Is it possible to make sense of the complex and often contradictory debates? In this concise and accessible introduction to feminist theory, Chris Beasley provides clear explanations of the many types of feminism. She outlines the development of liberal, radical and Marxist//socialist feminism, and reviews the more contemporary influences of psychoanalysis, postmodernism, theories of the body, queer theory, and attends to the (...)
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  37. Sebastian Gardner (2000). Psychoanalysis and the Personal/Sub-Personal Distinction. Philosophical Explorations 3 (1):96-119.score: 24.0
    This paper attempts in the first instance to clarify the application of the personal/sub-personal distinction to psychoanalysis and to indicate how this issue is related to that of psychoanalysis" epistemology. It is argued that psychoanalysis may be regarded either as a form of personal psychology, or as a form of jointly personal and sub-personal psychology, but not as a form of sub-personal psychology. It is further argued that psychoanalysis indicates a problem with the personal/sub-personal distinction itself (...)
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  38. Steve Pile (1996). The Body and the City: Psychoanalysis, Space, and Subjectivity. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Over the last century, psychoanalysis has transformed the ways in which we think about our relationships with others. Psychoanalytic concepts and methods, such as the unconscious and dream analysis, have greatly impacted on social, cultural and political theory. Reinterpreting the ways in which geography has explored people's mental maps and their deepest feelings about places, The Body and the City outlines a new cartography of the subject. Mapping key coordinates of meaning, identity and power across the sites of body (...)
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  39. Jim Hopkins (2013). Understanding and Healing: Psychiatry and Psychoanalysis in the Era of Neuroscience. In FulfordW (ed.), Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Psychiatry.score: 24.0
    This paper argues that psychoanalysis enables us to see mental disorder as rooted in emotional conflicts, particularly concerning aggression, to which our species has a natural liability. These can be traced in development, and seem rooted in both parent-offspring conflict and in-group cooperation for out-group conflict. In light of this we may hope that work in psychoanalysis and neuroscience will converge in indicating the most likely paths to a better neurobiological understanding of mental disorder.
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  40. Paul Muench (1993). The Analogy Between Psychoanalysis and Wittgenstein's Later Philosophical Methods. Dissertation, University of Oxfordscore: 24.0
    Wittgenstein’s analogy between psychoanalysis and his later philosophical methods is explored and developed. Historical evidence supports the claim that Wittgenstein characterized an early version of his general remarks on philosophy (§§89-133 in the Philosophical Investigations) as a sustained comparison with psychoanalysis. A non-adversarial, therapeutic interpretation is adopted towards Wittgenstein which emphasizes his focus on dissolving the metaphysical puzzlement of particular troubled individuals. A “picture” of Freudian psychoanalysis is sketched which highlights several features of Freud’s therapeutic techniques and (...)
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  41. Farhad Dalal (2002). Race, Colour and the Process of Racialization: New Perspectives From Group Analysis, Psychoanalysis, and Sociology. Brunner-Routledge.score: 24.0
    Farhad Dalal argues that people differentiate between races in order to make a distinction between the "haves" and "must-not-haves", and that this process is cognitive, emotional and political rather than biological. Examining the subject over the past thousand years, Race, Colour and the Process of Racialisation covers theories of racism and a general theory of difference based on the works of Fanon, Elias, Matte-Blanco and Foulkes, as well as application of this theory to race and racism. Farhad Dalal concludes that (...)
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  42. Beverly Dawn Metcalfe (2008). Women, Management and Globalization in the Middle East. Journal of Business Ethics 83 (1):85 - 100.score: 24.0
    This paper provides new theoretical insights into the interconnections and relationships between women, management and globalization in the Middle East (ME). The discussion is positioned within broader globalization debates about women’s social status in ME economies. Based on case study evidence and the UN datasets, the article critiques social, cultural and economic reasons for women’s limited advancement in the public sphere. These include the prevalence of the patriarchal work contract within public and private institutions, as well as (...)
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  43. Cecilia Sjöholm (2004). The Antigone Complex: Ethics and the Invention of Feminine Desire. Stanford University Press.score: 24.0
    What if psychoanalysis had chosen Antigone rather than Oedipus? This book traces the relation between ethics and desire in important philosophical texts that focus on femininity and use Antigone as their model. It shows that the notion of feminine desire is conditioned by a view of women as being prone to excesses and deficiencies in relation to ethical norms and rules. Sjöholm explains Mary Wollstonecraft’s work, as well as readings of Antigone by G.W.F. Hegel, Martin Heidegger, Luce Irigaray, (...)
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  44. Prasita Mukherjee (2012). Revolutionizing Agency: Sameness and Difference in the Representation of Women by Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain and Mahasweta Devi. ARGUMENT 2 (1):117-127.score: 24.0
    In this paper the sameness and difference between two distinguished Indian authors, Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain (1880–1932) and Mahasweta Devi (b. 1926), representing two generations almost a century apart, will be under analysis in order to trace the generational transformation in women’s writing in India, especially Bengal. Situated in the colonial and postcolonial frames of history, Hossain and Mahasweta Devi may be contextualized differently. At the same time their subjects are also differently categorized; the former is not particularly concerned with (...)
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  45. Marcia Cavell (2006). Becoming a Subject: Reflections in Philosophy and Psychoanalysis. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Marcia Cavell draws on philosophy, psychoanalysis, and the sciences of the mind in a fascinating and original investigation of human subjectivity. A "subject" is a creature, we may say, who recognizes herself as an "I," taking in the world from a subjective perspective; an agent, doing things for reasons, sometimes self-reflective, and able to assume responsibility for herself and some of her actions. If this is an ideal, how does a person become a subject, and what might stand in (...)
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  46. Alison M. Jaggar (2002). Vulnerable Women and Neo-Liberal Globalization: Debt Burdens Undermine Women's Health in the Global South. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (6):425-440.score: 24.0
    Contemporary processes of globalization havebeen accompanied by a serious deterioration inthe health of many women across the world. Particularly disturbing is the drastic declinein the health status of many women in theglobal South, as well as some women in theglobal North. This paper argues that thehealth vulnerability of women in the globalSouth is inseparable from their political andeconomic vulnerability. More specifically, itlinks the deteriorating health of many Southernwomen with the neo-liberal economic policiesthat characterize contemporary economicglobalization and (...)
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  47. Andrew Smith (2000). Gothic Radicalism: Literature, Philosophy, and Psychoanalysis in the Nineteenth Century. St. Martin's Press.score: 24.0
    Applying ideas drawn from contemporary critical theory, this book historicizes psychoanalysis through a new and significant theorization of the Gothic. The central premise is that the nineteenth-century Gothic produced a radical critique of accounts of sublimity and Freudian psychoanalysis. This book makes a major contribution to an understanding of both the nineteenth century and the Gothic discourse which challenged the dominant ideas of that period. Writers explored include Mary Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Bram Stoker.
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  48. Zena Burgess & Phyllis Tharenou (2002). Women Board Directors: Characteristics of the Few. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 37 (1):39 - 49.score: 24.0
    Appointment as a director of a company board often represents the pinnacle of a management career. Worldwide, it has been noted that very few women are appointed to the boards of directors of companies. Blame for the low numbers of women of company boards can be partly attributed to the widely publicized "glass ceiling". However, the very low representation of women on company boards requires further examination. This article reviews the current state of women's representation on (...)
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  49. Urszula Chowaniec & Marzenna Jakubczak (2012). Conceptualizing Generation and Transformation in Women’s Writing. ARGUMENT 2 (1):5-15.score: 24.0
    The main objective of this collection of papers is to explore ideas of generation and transformation in the context of postdependency discourse as it may be traced in women’s writing published in Bengali, Polish, Czech, Russian and English. As we believe, literature does not have merely a descriptive function or a purely visionary quality but serves also as a discursive medium, which is rhetorically sophisticated, imaginatively influential and stimulates cultural dynamics. It is an essential carrier of collective memory and (...)
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  50. Myrtle P. Bell, Mary E. Mclaughlin & Jennifer M. Sequeira (2002). Discrimination, Harassment, and the Glass Ceiling: Women Executives as Change Agents. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 37 (1):65 - 76.score: 24.0
    In this article, we discuss the relationships between discrimination, harassment, and the glass ceiling, arguing that many of the factors that preclude women from occupying executive and managerial positions also foster sexual harassment. We suggest that measures designed to increase numbers of women in higher level positions will reduce sexual harassment. We first define and discuss discrimination, harassment, and the glass ceiling, relationships between each, and relevant legislation. We next discuss the relationships between gender and sexual harassment, emphasizing (...)
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