Search results for 'Women and socialism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Representing Women (1994). Racism in Pornography and the Women's Movement. In Alison M. Jaggar (ed.), Living with Contradictions: Controversies in Feminist Social Ethics. Westview Press. 171.score: 180.0
  2. Judith Kegan Gardiner (2008). What Happened to Socialist Feminist Women's Studies Programs? A Case History and Some Speculations. Feminist Studies 34 (3):558-583.score: 120.0
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  3. A. Jaggar (1999). Socialist Feminism and the Standpoint of Women. In Michael Rosen & Jonathan Wolff (eds.), Political Thought. Oup Oxford.score: 120.0
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  4. Temma Kaplan (forthcoming). On the Socialist Origins of International Women's Day. Feminist Studies 11 (1).score: 120.0
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  5. Elizabeth Lapovsky Kennedy (2008). Socialist Feminism: What Difference Did It Make to the History of Women's Studies? Feminist Studies 34 (3):497-525.score: 120.0
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  6. Mary McCune (forthcoming). Creating a Place for Women in a Socialist Brotherhood: Class and Gender Politics in the Workmen's Circle, 1892-1930. Feminist Studies.score: 120.0
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  7. Karen Offen (1987). Sisters or Citizens? Women and Socialism in France Since 1876. History of European Ideas 8 (6):726-729.score: 120.0
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  8. S. Zukin (1975). Does Socialism Liberate Women? Experiences From Eastern Europe. Telos 1975 (23):198-205.score: 120.0
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  9. Sean Sayers & Peter Osborne (eds.) (1984/1990). Socialism, Feminism, and Philosophy: A Radical Philosophy Reader. Routledge.score: 84.0
    Since 1972, the journal Radical Philosophy has provided a forum for the discussion of radical and critical ideas in philosophy. This anthology reprints some of the best articles to have appeared in the journal during the past five years. It covers topics in social and moral philosophy which are central to current controversies on the left, focusing on theoretical issues raised by socialist, feminist, and environmental movements. The articles engage with contemporary issues in critical terms, and represent the best of (...)
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  10. Stefania Mihalache (2010). Socialismul si camuflarea de gen/ Socialism and gender camouflage. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 2 (6):117-131.score: 66.0
    Eroticism seems to be the essence of individuation and the freedom that brings Otherness into being. For this reason eroticism had to be disguised and softened by a mechanism of control within the society of any monolithic communist power. There- fore, one of the images that were altered was that of the woman. This was done under the pretext of a project of emancipation, initiated by the Communist party, which made claims in women’s name but utilized women’s organizations (...)
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  11. Raluca Maria Popa (2010). The Socialist Project for Gender (In)Equality: A Critical Discussion. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 2 (6):49-72.score: 66.0
    For most of nineteenth-century socialists, whose writings are examined in the scope of this paper, women’s equality with men was understood mainly in terms of their equal participation in the working collective. However, this concept of equality left unexamined the sexual division of labor by which men are central to production and women are central to reproduction. In the process of change towards a new socialist society, women were given the additional role of workers, but the bases (...)
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  12. Lise Vogel (1995). Woman Questions: Essays for a Materialist Feminism. Pluto Press.score: 54.0
    The essays are grouped in three sections. In Part I Vogel considers the relationship between feminism and socialism.
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  13. Clara Fraser (1998). Revolution, She Wrote. Red Letter Press.score: 54.0
    "Seattle's Grande Dame of Socialism, " Fraser is a groundbreaking theorist and lively popularizer of socialist feminist ideas, and the writing in this volume ...
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  14. Margaret McFadden (1989). Anna Doyle Wheeler (1785-1848): Philosopher, Socialist, Feminist. Hypatia 4 (1):91 - 101.score: 54.0
    This essay examines the life and work of early socialist thinker Anna Doyle Wheeler, who, with the Owenite theorist William Thompson, was author of The Appeal of One Half the Human Race, Women, Against the Pretentions of the Other Half, Men... (1825). In analyzing her thought, I employ a typological model for the development of a feminist consciousness proposed by Michèle Riot-Sarcey and Eleni Varikas (1986). These authors posit three types of a feminist "pariah" consciousness: 1) exceptional woman feminism (...)
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  15. Jeffrey A. Johnson (1998). German Women in Chemistry, 1925–1945 (Part II). NTM International Journal of History and Ethics of Natural Sciences, Technology and Medicine 6 (1):65-90.score: 54.0
    The paper traces the role of German women into the chemistry profession from 1925 to 1945, examining their relative numbers and experience in higher education, in academic and industrial careers as well as in professional organizations such as the Verein Deutscher Chemikerinnen. The paper examines the effect of the 1930s Depression, National Socialism, and World War II on women chemists, considering both general trends as well as the experiences and achievements of several individual women in a (...)
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  16. W. Stafford (1995). Ferdinand Tonnies on Gender, Women and the Family. History of Political Thought 16 (3):391-415.score: 54.0
    The paper will show that on women and the family his writings exhibit a contradictory stance between nineteenth-century patriarchalism and progressive ideas; he appears to oscillate, as it were, between Hegel or Ruskin and Engels or J.S. Mill. This seems curious to a late twentieth-century reader, but was by no means eccentric in the context of German feminist and socialist discourse of his time. His philosophy of gender cannot be dismissed as a mere collection of tired patriarchalist cliches; like (...)
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  17. Ana Barbic (1993). Farm Women in Slovenia: Endeavors for Equality. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 10 (4):13-25.score: 54.0
    In a short overview of farm women's issues in Western and former socialist countries the author identifies more similarities than differences between these regions. The abandonment of socialist systems gives farm women of all European countries a chance to fight jointly for their rights. The description of farm women in Slovenia based on extensive empirical evidence serves as a data base for the suggestions about how their situation within the family, the farm, and in public life can (...)
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  18. Judith DeGroat (2012). Working-Class Women and Republicanism in the French Revolution of 1848. History of European Ideas 38 (3):399-407.score: 54.0
    Following the February Revolution in 1848, working-class women as well as men attempted to hold the government to its promise of the right to work, through street demonstrations, individual and collective demands for work, and participation in the national workshops that had been established in an attempt to address the problem of unemployment in the capital. In the process, these activists articulated what scholars have labelled as a democratic socialist vision of republicanism. In June of 1848, women participated (...)
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  19. Blaženka Despot (2004). Izabrana Djela Blaženke Despot. Ženska Infoteka.score: 48.0
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  20. Anne Phillips (1993). Democracy and Difference. Pennsylvania State University Press.score: 48.0
  21. Richard J. Evans (1982). Theory and Practice in German Social-Democracy 1880-1914-Zetkin, Clara and the Socialist Theory of Womens Emancipation. History of Political Thought 3 (2):285-304.score: 40.0
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  22. John L. Hammond (2012). Ann Ferguson, a Feminist Philosopher and Social Justice Activist, is an Emerita Professor of Philosophy and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Stud-Ies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She has Written Numer-Ous Articles on Feminist Theory, Ethics, and Politics; Written Two Books, Blood at the Root: Motherhood, Sexuality, and Male Dominance (1989) And. In Anatole Anton Anton & Richard Schmitt (eds.), Taking Socialism Seriously. Lexington Books. 263.score: 36.0
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  23. Maya J. Goldenberg (2010). Perspectives on Evidence-Based Healthcare for Women. Journal of Women's Health 19 (7):1235-1238.score: 27.0
    We live in an age of evidence-based healthcare, where the concept of evidence has been avidly and often uncritically embraced as a symbol of legitimacy, truth, and justice. By letting the evidence dictate healthcare decision making from the bedside to the policy level, the normative claims that inform decision making appear to be negotiated fairly—without subjectivity, prejudice, or bias. Thus, the term ‘‘evidence-based’’ is typically read in the health sciences as the empirically adequate standard of reasonable practice and a means (...)
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  24. Speranta Dumitru (2014). From 'Brain Drain' to 'Care Drain': Women's Labor Migration, Methodological Sexism and Care Devaluation. Women's Studies International Forum:x-x.score: 27.0
    The metaphor of “care drain” has been created as a womanly parallel to the “brain drain” idea. Just as “brain drain” suggests that the skilled migrants are an economic loss for the sending country, “care drain” describes the migrant women hired as care workers as a loss of care for their children left behind. This paper criticizes the construction of migrant women as “care drain” for three reasons: 1) it is built on sexist stereotypes, 2) it misrepresents and (...)
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  25. Toni Adleberg, Morgan Thompson & Eddy Nahmias (forthcoming). Do Men and Women Have Different Philosophical Intuitions? Further Data. Philosophical Psychology:1-27.score: 24.0
    To address the underrepresentation of women in philosophy effectively, we must understand the causes of the loss of women after their initial philosophy classes. In this paper we challenge one of the few explanations that has focused on why women might leave philosophy at early stages. Wesley Buckwalter and Stephen Stich (2014) offer some evidence that women have different intuitions than men about philosophical thought experiments. We present some concerns about their evidence and we discuss our (...)
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  26. Chris Beasley (1999). What is Feminism?: An Introduction to Feminist Theory. Sage.score: 24.0
    So what is feminism anyway? Why are all the experts so reluctant to give us a clear definition? Is it possible to make sense of the complex and often contradictory debates? In this concise and accessible introduction to feminist theory, Chris Beasley provides clear explanations of the many types of feminism. She outlines the development of liberal, radical and Marxist//socialist feminism, and reviews the more contemporary influences of psychoanalysis, postmodernism, theories of the body, queer theory, and attends to the ongoing (...)
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  27. Pablo Gilabert (2012). Cohen on Socialism, Equality and Community. Socialist Studies 8 (1):101-121.score: 24.0
  28. Imelda Whelehan (1995). Modern Feminist Thought: From the Second Wave to "Post-Feminism". New York University Press.score: 24.0
    From the historical roots of second-wave feminism to current debates about feminist theory and politics. This introduction to Anglo-American feminist thought provides a critical and panoramic survey of dominant trends in feminism since 1968. Feminism is too often considered a monolithic movement, consisting of an enormous range of women and ideologies, with both similar and different perspectives and approaches. The book is divided into two parts, the first of which takes a close look at the most influential strands of (...)
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  29. Beverly Dawn Metcalfe (2008). Women, Management and Globalization in the Middle East. Journal of Business Ethics 83 (1):85 - 100.score: 24.0
    This paper provides new theoretical insights into the interconnections and relationships between women, management and globalization in the Middle East (ME). The discussion is positioned within broader globalization debates about women’s social status in ME economies. Based on case study evidence and the UN datasets, the article critiques social, cultural and economic reasons for women’s limited advancement in the public sphere. These include the prevalence of the patriarchal work contract within public and private institutions, as well as (...)
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  30. Val Plumwood (1991). Nature, Self, and Gender: Feminism, Environmental Philosophy, and the Critique of Rationalism. Hypatia 6 (1):3 - 27.score: 24.0
    Rationalism is the key to the connected oppressions of women and nature in the West. Deep ecology has failed to provide an adequate historical perspective or an adequate challenge to human/nature dualism. A relational account of self enables us to reject an instrumental view of nature and develop an alternative based on respect without denying that nature is distinct from the self. This shift of focus links feminist, environmentalist, and certain forms of socialist critiques. The critique of anthropocentrism is (...)
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  31. Prasita Mukherjee (2012). Revolutionizing Agency: Sameness and Difference in the Representation of Women by Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain and Mahasweta Devi. ARGUMENT 2 (1):117-127.score: 24.0
    In this paper the sameness and difference between two distinguished Indian authors, Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain (1880–1932) and Mahasweta Devi (b. 1926), representing two generations almost a century apart, will be under analysis in order to trace the generational transformation in women’s writing in India, especially Bengal. Situated in the colonial and postcolonial frames of history, Hossain and Mahasweta Devi may be contextualized differently. At the same time their subjects are also differently categorized; the former is not particularly concerned with (...)
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  32. Robert S. Taylor (2014). Illiberal Socialism. Social Theory and Practice 40 (3):433-460.score: 24.0
    Is “liberal socialism” an oxymoron? Not quite, but I will demonstrate here that it is a much more unstable and uncommon hybrid than scholars had previously thought and that almost all liberals should reject socialism, even in its most attractive form. More specifically, I will show that three leading varieties of liberalism—neutralist, plural-perfectionist, and deliberative-democratic—are incompatible with even a moderate form of socialism, viz., associational market socialism. My paper will also cast grave doubt on Rawls’s belief (...)
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  33. Alison M. Jaggar (2002). Vulnerable Women and Neo-Liberal Globalization: Debt Burdens Undermine Women's Health in the Global South. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (6):425-440.score: 24.0
    Contemporary processes of globalization havebeen accompanied by a serious deterioration inthe health of many women across the world. Particularly disturbing is the drastic declinein the health status of many women in theglobal South, as well as some women in theglobal North. This paper argues that thehealth vulnerability of women in the globalSouth is inseparable from their political andeconomic vulnerability. More specifically, itlinks the deteriorating health of many Southernwomen with the neo-liberal economic policiesthat characterize contemporary economicglobalization and (...)
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  34. Zena Burgess & Phyllis Tharenou (2002). Women Board Directors: Characteristics of the Few. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 37 (1):39 - 49.score: 24.0
    Appointment as a director of a company board often represents the pinnacle of a management career. Worldwide, it has been noted that very few women are appointed to the boards of directors of companies. Blame for the low numbers of women of company boards can be partly attributed to the widely publicized "glass ceiling". However, the very low representation of women on company boards requires further examination. This article reviews the current state of women's representation on (...)
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  35. Urszula Chowaniec & Marzenna Jakubczak (2012). Conceptualizing Generation and Transformation in Women’s Writing. ARGUMENT 2 (1):5-15.score: 24.0
    The main objective of this collection of papers is to explore ideas of generation and transformation in the context of postdependency discourse as it may be traced in women’s writing published in Bengali, Polish, Czech, Russian and English. As we believe, literature does not have merely a descriptive function or a purely visionary quality but serves also as a discursive medium, which is rhetorically sophisticated, imaginatively influential and stimulates cultural dynamics. It is an essential carrier of collective memory and (...)
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  36. Myrtle P. Bell, Mary E. Mclaughlin & Jennifer M. Sequeira (2002). Discrimination, Harassment, and the Glass Ceiling: Women Executives as Change Agents. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 37 (1):65 - 76.score: 24.0
    In this article, we discuss the relationships between discrimination, harassment, and the glass ceiling, arguing that many of the factors that preclude women from occupying executive and managerial positions also foster sexual harassment. We suggest that measures designed to increase numbers of women in higher level positions will reduce sexual harassment. We first define and discuss discrimination, harassment, and the glass ceiling, relationships between each, and relevant legislation. We next discuss the relationships between gender and sexual harassment, emphasizing (...)
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  37. Bertrand Russell, Proposed Roads to Freedom: Socialism, Anarchism and Syndicalism.score: 24.0
    What is perhaps most remarkable in regard to both Socialism and Anarchism is the association of a widespread popular movement with ideals for a better world. The ideals have been elaborated, in the first instance, by solitary writers of books, and yet powerful sections of the wage-earning classes have accepted them as their guide in the practical affairs of the world. In regard to Socialism this is evident; but in regard to Anarchism it is only true with some (...)
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  38. Anne Waters (2003). Introduction: Special Issue on "Native American Women, Feminism, and Indigenism&Quot;. Hypatia 18 (2).score: 24.0
    Anticipate that this volume will nourish discussions in Native American, Indigenous, and Women's Studies, as well as in interdisciplinary courses. In respecting all of our relations, we present this journal in the spirit of healing the earth.The second theme is the incredible violence committed against Native women in the name of a continuing manifest destiny. Internalized oppression, violence turned against oneself, is devastating our communities as elders and youth stand by and watch generations of our people get lost (...)
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  39. Nicholas Vrousalis (2010). G. A. Cohen's Vision of Socialism. Journal of Ethics 14 (3-4):185-216.score: 24.0
    This essay is an attempt to piece together the elements of G. A. Cohen's thought on the theory of socialism during his long intellectual voyage from Marxism to political philosophy. It begins from his theory of the maldistribution of freedom under capitalism, moves onto his critique of libertarian property rights, to his diagnosis of the “deep inegalitarian” structure of John Rawls' theory and concludes with his rejection of the “cheap” fraternity promulgated by liberal egalitarianism. The paper's exegetical contention is (...)
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  40. John E. Roemer (2010). Jerry Cohens Why Not Socialism? Some Thoughts. Journal of Ethics 14 (3-4):255-262.score: 24.0
    In his book Why Not Socialism? , G.A. Cohen described several kinds of inequality that would be acceptable under socialism, yet nonetheless harmful to community. I describe another kind of inequality with this property, deriving from the legitimate transmission of preferences and values from parents to children. In the same book, Cohen proposes that the designing of a socialist allocation mechanism is a key problem for socialist theory. I maintain this is less of a problem than he believes. (...)
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  41. Jyotsna Agnihotri Gupta & Annemiek Richters (2008). Embodied Subjects and Fragmented Objects: Women's Bodies, Assisted Reproduction Technologies and the Right to Self-Determination. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (4):239-249.score: 24.0
    This article focuses on the transformation of the female reproductive body with the use of assisted reproduction technologies under neo-liberal economic globalisation, wherein the ideology of trade without borders is central, as well as under liberal feminist ideals, wherein the right to self-determination is central. Two aspects of the body in western medicine—the fragmented body and the commodified body, and the integral relation between these two—are highlighted. This is done in order to analyse the implications of local and global transactions (...)
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  42. Baukje Prins, Mothers and Muslima's, Sisters and Sojourners;The Contested Boundaries of Feminist Citizenship.score: 24.0
    In the early 1990’s, many feminist philosophers found that the practice of the women´s movement as well as those of other new social movements, could be articulated most adequately in terms of citizenship. The classical political vocabulary of citizenship seemed to offer a viable alternative to the vocabularies that until then had been dominant in feminist political theory: the individualistic, rights-oriented discourse of liberalism, and the structuralist, interest-oriented perspectives of socialism and marxism.
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  43. Marja Rytkӧnen (2012). Memorable Fiction. Evoking Emotions and Family Bonds in Post-Soviet Russian Women’s Writing. ARGUMENT 2 (1):59-74.score: 24.0
    This article deals with women-centred prose texts of the 1990s and 2000s in Russia written by women, and focuses especially on generation narratives. By this term the author means fictional texts that explore generational relations within families, from the perspective of repressed experiences, feelings and attitudes in the Soviet period. The selected texts are interpreted as narrating and conceptualizing the consequences of patriarchal ideology for relations between mothers and daughters and for reconstructing connections between Soviet and post-Soviet by (...)
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  44. Xiaohe Lu (2010). Business Ethics and Karl Marx's Theory of Capital – Reflections on Making Use of Capital for Developing China's Socialist Market Economy. Journal of Business Ethics 91 (1):95 - 111.score: 24.0
    Making use of capital to develop China’s socialist market economy requires China not only to fully recognize the tendency of capital civilization but also to realize its intrinsic limitations and to seek conditions and a path for overcoming contradictions in the mode of capitalist production. Karl Marx’s theory of capital provides us with a key to understanding and dealing properly with problems of capital. At the same time we should also pay heed to Western research on, experience with, and lessons (...)
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  45. Susan Wendell (1987). A (Qualified) Defense of Liberal Feminism. Hypatia 2 (2):65 - 93.score: 24.0
    Liberal feminism is not committed to a number of philosophical positions for which it is frequently criticized, including abstract individualism, certain individualistic approaches to morality and society, valuing the mental/rational over the physical/emotional, and the traditional liberal way of drawing the line between the public and the private. Moreover, liberal feminism's clearest political commitments, including equality of opportunity, are important to women's liberation and not necessarily incompatible with the goals of socialist and radical feminism.
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  46. Ruth Alas & Christopher J. Rees (2006). Work-Related Attitudes, Values and Radical Change in Post-Socialist Contexts: A Comparative Study. Journal of Business Ethics 68 (2):181 - 189.score: 24.0
    The study draws attention to the transfer of management theories and practices from traditional capitalist countries such as the USA and UK to post-socialist countries that are currently experiencing radical change as they seek to introduce market reforms. It is highlighted that the efficacy of this transfer of management theories and practices is, in part, dependent upon the extent to which work-related attitudes and values vary between traditional capitalist and former socialist contexts. We highlight that practices such as Human Resource (...)
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  47. Jacqueline Broad (2002). Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    In this rich and detailed study of early modern women's thought, Jacqueline Broad explores the complexity of women's responses to Cartesian philosophy and its intellectual legacy in England and Europe. She examines the work of thinkers such as Mary Astell, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Margaret Cavendish, Anne Conway and Damaris Masham, who were active participants in the intellectual life of their time and were also the respected colleagues of philosophers such as Descartes, Leibniz and Locke. She also illuminates the (...)
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  48. Chong Ju Choi & Sae Won Kim (2008). Women and Globalization: Ethical Dimensions of Knowledge Transfer in Global Organizations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 81 (1):53 - 61.score: 24.0
    The topic of women and globalization raises fundamental questions on the impact of globalization on women, ethnic minorities and other socio-demographically under-represented actors in global organizations. This article seeks to integrate theories of procedural justice, psychological contracts, motivation and psychological ownership in knowledge transfer in global organizations, and the implications for women, and other under-represented actors. Our analysis concurs with current research on the need for a relativist perspective in business ethics research and one that encompasses the (...)
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  49. Sohail H. Hashmi (2010). The Rights of Muslim Women: A Comment on Irene Oh's the Rights of God. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (3):588-593.score: 24.0
    This review of Irene Oh's The Rights of God focuses on women's rights in Islamic theory and practice. Oh suggests that religious establishments, and the texts they disseminate, often press believers to recognize and reject social problems, such as racial and gender discrimination. Islamic scholars and texts have played a more ambiguous role in efforts to recognize women's rights within Muslim states. Modernist intellectuals have used Islamic texts to support the advancement of women's rights, but members of (...)
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  50. Lena Gunnarsson (2011). A Defence of the Category ‘Women’. Feminist Theory 12 (1):23-37.score: 24.0
    Against influential strands of feminist theory, I argue that there is nothing essentialist or homogenising about the category ‘women’. I show that both intersectional claims that it is impossible to separate out the ‘woman part’ of women, and deconstructionist contentions that the category ‘women’ is a fiction, rest on untenable meta-theoretical assumptions. I posit that a more fruitful way of approaching this disputed category is to treat it as an abstraction. Drawing on the philosophical framework of critical (...)
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