Search results for 'Women in Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Sarah Tyson (2013). Reclamation From Absence? Luce Irigaray and Women in the History of Philosophy. Hypatia 28 (3):483-498.score: 594.0
    Luce Irigaray's work does not present an obvious resource for projects seeking to reclaim women in the history of philosophy. Indeed, many authors introduce their reclamation project with an argument against conceptions, attributed to Irigaray or “French feminists” more generally, that the feminine is the excluded other of discourse. These authors claim that if the feminine is the excluded other of discourse, then we must conclude that even if women have written philosophy they have not given (...)
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  2. Nanette Funk & Andrew Wengraf (1998). Honoring Gertrude Ezorsky: The Society for Women in Philosophy's 1997 Distinguished Woman Professor. Radical Philosophy Review 1 (2):126-132.score: 549.0
    The paper included here was presented by Nanette Funk in Honor of Gertrude Ezorsky, the famed philosopher, feminist, and antiracism activist, at the 1997 Meeting of the Society for Women in Philosophy. It is published here as presented. Thus, although it is a coauthored talk the “I” refers to Nanette Funk.
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  3. Molly Paxton, Carrie Figdor & Valerie Tiberius (2012). Quantifying the Gender Gap: An Empirical Study of the Underrepresentation of Women in Philosophy. Hypatia 27 (4):949-957.score: 540.0
    The lack of gender parity in philosophy has garnered serious attention recently. Previous empirical work that aims to quantify what has come to be called “the gender gap” in philosophy focuses mainly on the absence of women in philosophy faculty and graduate programs. Our study looks at gender representation in philosophy among undergraduate students, undergraduate majors, graduate students, and faculty. Our findings are consistent with what other studies have found about women faculty in (...), but we were able to add two pieces of new information. First, the biggest drop in the proportion of women in philosophy occurs between students enrolled in introductory philosophy classes and philosophy majors. Second, this drop is mitigated by the presence of more women philosophy faculty. (shrink)
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  4. Yann Benétreau-Dupin & Guillaume Beaulac (forthcoming). Fair Numbers: What Data Can and Cannot Tell Us About the Underrepresentation of Women in Philosophy. Ergo.score: 540.0
    The low representation of women in philosophy (<30%) in English-speaking countries has generated much discussion, both in academic circles and the public sphere. It is sometimes suggested (Haslanger, 2009) that unconscious biases, acting at every level in the field, may be grounded in gendered schemas of philosophers and the discipline more widely and that actions to make philosophy a more welcoming place for women should address such schemas. However, existing data are too limited to fully warrant (...)
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  5. Helen E. Lees (2013). Is R.S. Peters' Way of Mentioning Women in His Texts Detrimental to Philosophy of Education? Some Considerations and Questions. Ethics and Education 7 (3):291 - 302.score: 540.0
    (2012). Is R.S. Peters' way of mentioning women in his texts detrimental to philosophy of education? Some considerations and questions. Ethics and Education: Vol. 7, Creating spaces, pp. 291-302. doi: 10.1080/17449642.2013.767002.
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  6. Marilyn Friedman (2013). Women in Philosophy. In Katrina Hutchison & Fiona Jenkins (eds.), Women in Philosophy: What Needs to Change? Oup Usa. 21.score: 540.0
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  7. Marije Altorf (2011). After Cursing the Library: Iris Murdoch and the (In)Visibility of Women in Philosophy. Hypatia 26 (2):384-402.score: 537.0
    This article offers a critical reading of three major biographies of the British novelist and philosopher Iris Murdoch. It considers in particular how a limited concern for gender issues has hampered their portrayals of Murdoch as a creator of images and ideas. The biographies are then contrasted to a biographical sketch constructed from Murdoch's philosophical writing. The assessment of the biographies is set against the larger background of the relation between women and philosophy. In doing so, the paper (...)
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  8. Katrina Hutchison & Fiona Jenkins (eds.) (2013). Women in Philosophy: What Needs to Change? OUP USA.score: 531.0
    Why are professional philosophers today still overwhelmingly male? Often it is assumed that women need to change to fit existing institutions. This book instead offers concrete reflections on the way in which philosophy needs to change to benefit from the important contribution women's full participation makes to the discipline.
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  9. Catriona Mackenzie & Cynthia Townley (2013). Women In and Out of Philosophy. In Katrina Hutchison & Fiona Jenkins (eds.), Women in Philosophy: What Needs to Change? Oup Usa. 164.score: 525.0
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  10. Erin C. Tarver (2013). The Dismissal of Feminist Philosophy and Hostility to Women in the Profession. APA Newsletter on Feminist Philosophy 12 (2):8-11.score: 516.0
  11. Rosi Braidotti (1991). Patterns of Dissonance: A Study of Women in Contemporary Philosophy. Routledge.score: 507.0
  12. Ellen Kennedy & Susan Mendus (eds.) (1987). Women in Western Political Philosophy: Kant to Nietzsche. St. Martin's Press.score: 507.0
  13. Ann Garry & Marilyn Pearsall (eds.) (1996). Women, Knowledge, and Reality: Explorations in Feminist Philosophy, 2nd Ed. Routledge.score: 504.0
    This second edition of Women, Knowledge and Reality continues to exhibit the ways in which feminist philosophers enrich and challenge philosophy. Essays by twenty-five feminist philosophers, seventeen of them new to the second edition, address fundamental issues in philosophical and feminist methods, metaphysics, epistemology, and the philosophies of science, language, religion and mind/body. This second edition expands the perspectives of women of color, of postmodernism and French feminism, and focuses on the most recent controversies in feminist theory (...)
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  14. Neil Levy (2014). Katrina Hutchison and Fiona Jenkins (Eds.) , Women in Philosophy: What Needs to Change? Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 34 (3-4):132-135.score: 504.0
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  15. Marcos Roberto Nunes Costa (2012). Women Intellectuals in the Middle Ages: Hildegard of Bingen - Between Medicine, Philosophy and Mysticism. Trans/Form/Ação 35 (SPE):187-208.score: 492.0
    É corrente se afirmar que antes da Modernidade não há registro de mulheres na construção do pensamento erudito. Que, se tomarmos, po exemplo, a Filosofia e a Teologia, que foram as duas áreas do conhecimento que mais produziram intelectuais, durante a Idade Média, não encontraremos aí a presença de mulheres. Entretanto, apesar de todas as evidências, se vasculharmos a construção do Pensamento Ocidental, veremos que é possível identificar a presença de algumas mulheres já nos tempos remotos, na Antiguidade Clássica e (...)
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  16. Samantha Brennan & Rob Corless, Creating a Warmer Environment for Women in the Mathematical Sciences and in Philosophy.score: 489.0
    Speaking from our experience as department chairs in fields in which women are traditionally underrepresented, we offer reflections and advice on how one might move beyond the chilly climate and create a warmer environment for women students and faculty members.
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  17. Teresa Genevieve Wojcik & Connie Titone (2013). Student Responses to the Women's Reclamation Work in the Philosophy of Education. Educational Studies 49 (1):32-44.score: 486.0
    Reclamation work denotes the process of uncovering the lost contributions of women to the philosophy of education, analyzing their works, making them accessible to a larger audience, and (re)introducing them to the historical record and canon. Since the 1970s, scholars have been engaged in the reclamation work, thus making available to students, professors, and researchers a rich and varied perspective for tracing the evolution of educational thought. This article shares the responses of undergraduate and graduate students to discussing (...)
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  18. Ann Garry & Marilyn Pearsall (eds.) (1989). Women, Knowledge and Reality: Explorations in Feminist Philosophy. Routledge.score: 486.0
    In recent years feminist philosophers have provided us with an extensive critique of traditional philosophy. In questioning its most fundamental assumptions, they are exposing the inadequacies of theories that ignored gender and the ways in which it shapes experiences and perception theory. Women, Knowledge & Reality is the first book to address the impact of feminist scholarship on methodology, metaphysics, theory of knowledge (and their subfields), at an introductory level. It fills a gap in the philosophical literature and (...)
     
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  19. Felicia Ackerman (2002). From Midwest Studies in Philosophy 26 (2002): 1-12 “Always to Do Ladies, Damosels, and Gentlewomen Succor”: Women and the Chivalric Code in Malory's Morte Darthur. [REVIEW] Midwest Studies in Philosophy 26:1-12.score: 477.0
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  20. Morag Buchan (1999). Women in Plato's Political Theory. Routledge.score: 471.0
    This book examines the role of the female and the feminine in Plato's philosophy, and suggests that Plato's views on women are central to his political philosophy. Morag Buchan explores Plato's writings to argue his notions of the inferior female and the superior male. While Plato appears to allow women equal opportunity and participation of political life in the Ideal State in The Republic , his motivation rests on masculine ideals. Women in Plato's Political Theory (...)
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  21. S. M. Turner (1993). Ellen Kennedy and Susan Mendus Eds., Women in Western Political Philosophy Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 13 (3):99-101.score: 471.0
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  22. Louise Antony (2012). Different Voices or Perfect Storm: Why Are There So Few Women in Philosophy? Journal of Social Philosophy 43 (3):227-255.score: 459.0
  23. Kathleen V. Wilkes (1979). Women in "Philosophy". Philosophy 54 (208):236 - 238.score: 459.0
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  24. Amy Wuest (2013). Yes, There Is a Problem: What Is to Be Done About the Climate for Women in Philosophy? Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 3 (1):146-150.score: 459.0
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  25. L. D. Derksen (1996). Dialogues on Women: Images of Women in the History of Philosophy. Vu University Press.score: 453.0
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  26. Alison Wylie (2011). Women in Philosophy: The Costs of Exclusion—Editor's Introduction. Hypatia 26 (2):374-382.score: 450.0
  27. Jennifer Saul (2012). Women in Philosophy. The Philosophers' Magazine 59 (59):38-43.score: 450.0
  28. Catherine Millot (2009). The Meeting of the Society for Women in Philosophy (SWIP), Pacific Division, on May 20, 1995, Was the First Time I Presented an Academic Paper on an Overtly Trans-Gender Topic From an Openly Ftm Subject Position. 1 This Was the Day After I Received My First Injection of Exogenous Testosterone. Despite Being Beside Myself From the Profound Shifts in Consciousness Engendered by That First Shot of Boy-Juice, Trepida. [REVIEW] In Laurie J. Shrage (ed.), You've Changed: Sex Reassignment and Personal Identity. Oup Usa. 43.score: 450.0
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  29. Sara Ruddick (2006). Singing in the Fire: Stories of Women in Philosophy. Edited by Linda Mart�N Alcoff. New York: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2003. Hypatia 21 (2):207-219.score: 450.0
  30. Mary Rorty, Claudia Card, Elizabeth Eames, Virginia Held, Helen Longino, Susan Mattingly, Susan Salladay, Avrum Stroll & Joyce Trebilcot (1987). Special Report: Women in Philosophy. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 60 (4):681 - 698.score: 450.0
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  31. Sara Ruddick (2006). Singing in the Fire: Stories of Women in Philosophy (Review). Hypatia 21 (2):207-219.score: 450.0
  32. Ophelia Benson (2013). Women in Philosophy. The Philosophers' Magazine 62 (62):19-20.score: 450.0
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  33. Margaret Whitford & Morwenna Griffiths (1996). Society for Women in Philosophy. Die Philosophin 7 (13):130-132.score: 450.0
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  34. Sandra Bartky, Teresa Brennan, Claudia Card, Virginia Held, Alison Jaggar, Stephanie Lewis, Uma Narayan, Martha Nussbaum, Andrea Nye, Kristin Schrader-Frechette, Ofelia Schutte & Karen Warren (2003). Singing in the Fire: Stories of Women in Philosophy. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 450.0
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  35. Linda Lopez Mcalister (1989). Some Remarks on Exploring the History of Women in Philosophy. Hypatia 4 (1):1-5.score: 450.0
  36. Alison Bailey (2005). Book Review: Naomi Zack.Women of Color and Philosophy. Malden, Mass.: Blackwell Publishers, 2000. [REVIEW] Hypatia 20 (1):220-225.score: 447.0
    Naomi Zack’s unique and important collection, Women of Color and Philosophy, brings together for the first time the voices of twelve philosophers who are women of color. She begins with the premise that the work of women of color who do philosophy in academe, but who do not write exclusively on issues of race, ethnicity, and gender, merits a collection of its own. It’s rare that women of color pursue philosophy in academic contexts; (...)
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  37. Diemut Bubeck (2000). Feminism in Political Philosophy: Women's Difference. In Miranda Fricker & Jennifer Hornsby (eds.), Cambridge Companion to Feminism in Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 447.0
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  38. Eileen O'Neill (1988). Women in Western Political Philosophy. Teaching Philosophy 11 (1):73-76.score: 444.0
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  39. Hanne Andersen (2013). Women in the History of Philosophy of Science: What We Do and Do Not Know. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 3 (1):136-139.score: 444.0
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  40. Katherine K. Young (1997). Response to Ruth Andersen's Review of "the Annual Review of Women in World Religions," a "Philosophy East and West" Feature Review. Philosophy East and West 47 (4):581-587.score: 444.0
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  41. Babette Babich (2010). COMMENT-Hey! Can't You Smile! Women and Status in Philosophy. Radical Philosophy 160:36.score: 444.0
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  42. Borin Dubin (2003). Ph. D. In Philosophy, Lecturer in the Philosophical Faculty of the Novosibirsk State University, Director of the Non-Governmental Library for Human Rights and the Situation of Women (Resursnyj Centr Gumanitarnogo Obrazovanija), Author of Articles About Problems of Gender Relations. [REVIEW] Studies in East European Thought 55:81-83.score: 444.0
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  43. Eileen O'Neill (2007). Justifying the Inclusion of Women in Our Histories of Philosophy: The Case of Marie de Gournay. In Linda Alcoff & Eva Feder Kittay (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to Feminist Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..score: 444.0
  44. John Kaag (2008). Women and Forgotten Movements in American Philosophy: The Work of Ella Lyman Cabot and Mary Parker Follett. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (1):pp. 134-157.score: 441.0
    This paper recovers and investigates the work of two forgotten figures in the history of American philosophy: Ella Lyman Cabot and Mary Parker Follett. It focuses on Cabot's work, developed between 1889 and 1906. During this period, Cabot took several classes given by Josiah Royce at Radcliffe College. Cabot's work creatively extends Royce's early thinking on the issues of growth, unity, and loyalty. This paper claims that Cabot's writing serves as a valuable type of Roycean interpretation—an interpretation that sheds (...)
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  45. Joan Gibson (2006). The Logic of Chastity: Women, Sex, and the History of Philosophy in the Early Modern Period. Hypatia 21 (4):1-19.score: 441.0
    : Before women could become visible as philosophers, they had first to become visible as rational autonomous thinkers. A social and ethical position holding that chastity was the most important virtue for women, and that rationality and chastity were incompatible, was a significant impediment to accepting women's capacity for philosophical thought. Thus one of the first tasks for women was to confront this belief and argue for their rationality in the face of a self-referential dilemma.
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  46. Wendy E. Burton (1994). Marilyn Pearsall, Women and Values: Readings in Recent Feminist Philosophy, Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 14 (4):281-283.score: 441.0
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  47. Ella Lyman Cabot & John Kaag (2008). Project MUSE Journals Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society: A Quarterly Journal in American Philosophy Volume 44, Number 1, Winter 2008 Women and Forgotten Movements in American Philosophy: The Work of Ella Lyman Cabot and Mary Parker Follett. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society: A Quarterly Journal in American Philosophy 44 (1).score: 441.0
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  48. Sven Ove Hansson (2010). Women and Minorities in Philosophy. Theoria 76 (1):1-3.score: 435.0
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  49. Anita Allen, Anika Maaza Mann, Donna-Dale L. Marcano, Michele Moody-Adams & Jacqueline Scott (2008). Situated Voices: Black Women in/on the Profession of Philosophy. Hypatia 23 (2):160 - 189.score: 435.0
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