Search results for 'Women in science' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. National Committee for Research Ethics in Science & Technology (2009). Guidelines for Research Ethics in Science and Technology. Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 14 (1).score: 1640.0
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  2. Naonori Kodate, Kashiko Kodate & Takako Kodate (2010). Mission Completed? Changing Visibility of Women's Colleges in England and Japan and Their Roles in Promoting Gender Equality in Science. Minerva 48 (3):309-330.score: 597.0
    The global community, from UNESCO to NGOs, is committed to promoting the status of women in science, engineering and technology, despite long-held prejudices and the lack of role models. Previously, when equality was not firmly established as a key issue on international or national agendas, women’s colleges played a great role in mentoring female scientists. However, now that a concerted effort has been made by governments, the academic community and the private sector to give women equal (...)
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  3. Anne G. Rosenwald (2011). Beyond Bias and Barriers: Fulfilling the Potential of Women in Academic Science and Engineering. BioScience 61 (10):823-825.score: 516.0
    The United States economy relies on the productivity, entrepreneurship, and creativity of its people. To maintain its scientific and engineering leadership amid increasing economic and educational globalization, the United States must aggressively pursue the innovative capacity of all its people—women and men. However, women face barriers to success in every field of science and engineering; obstacles that deprive the country of an important source of talent. Without a transformation of academic institutions to tackle such barriers, the future (...)
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  4. Carol Kemelgor & Henry Etzkowitz (2001). Overcoming Isolation: Women's Dilemmas in American Academic Science. [REVIEW] Minerva 39 (2):153-174.score: 492.0
    Science is an intensely social activity. Professional relationships are essential forscientific success and mentors areindispensable for professional growth. Despitethe scientific ethos of universalism andinclusion, American women scientists frequentlyexperience isolation and exclusion at some timeduring their academic career. By contrast,male scientists enjoy informal but crucialsocial networks. Female scientists developnecessary strategies and defences, but manyleave or achieve less success in science whendeprived of necessary interpersonalconnections. There is indication that changewithin departments is occurring, but this isdependent upon institutional leadership.
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  5. Motoko Kuwahara (2001). Japanese Women in Science and Technology. Minerva 39 (2):203-216.score: 492.0
    Women make up about ten per cent of the scientists and engineers in Japan. The aim of this essay is to make clear why, even in the year 2001, there are so few women in these disciplines. I will suggest that the socio-economic structure and gender ideology of Japan since the Second World War is responsible for this shortage which is often erroneously attributed to the cultural traditions of feudal Japan.
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  6. Ilse Costas (2002). Women in Science in Germany. Science in Context 15 (4):557-576.score: 486.0
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  7. Claudine Hermann & Franoise Cyrot-Lackmann (2002). Women in Science in France. Science in Context 15 (4):529-556.score: 486.0
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  8. Londa Schiebinger (2002). European Women in Science. Science in Context 15 (4):473-481.score: 486.0
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  9. Christine Min Wotipka & Francisco O. Ramirez (2003). Women in Science: For Development, for Human Rights, for Themselves. In Gili S. Drori (ed.), Science in the Modern World Polity: Institutionalization and Globalization. Stanford University Press.score: 486.0
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  10. Mineke Bosch (2002). Women and Science in the Netherlands: A Dutch Case? Science in Context 15 (4):483-527.score: 471.0
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  11. Cassandra L. Pinnick (2008). Science Education for Women: Situated Cognition, Feminist Standpoint Theory, and the Status of Women in Science. Science and Education 17 (10):1055-1063.score: 459.0
  12. Marina Benjamin (1988). Uneasy Careers and Intimate Lives: Women in Science, 1789-1979, Ed. By Pnina Abir-Am and Dorinda Outram. History of Science 26:439-441.score: 459.0
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  13. Sue V. Rosser (1986). The Relationship Between Women's Studies and Women in Science. In Ruth Bleier (ed.), Feminist Approaches to Science. Pergamon Press. 165--80.score: 459.0
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  14. Barbara Mandula (1994). A Helping Hand A Hand Up: Women Mentoring Women in Science D. C. Fort. BioScience 44 (3):182-183.score: 450.0
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  15. Elizabeth M. Jakob (2001). Lessons From Successful Women in Science. BioScience 51 (10):885.score: 450.0
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  16. Jane L. Lehr (2001). Athena Unbound: The Advancement of Women in Science and Technology. BioScience 51 (6):504.score: 450.0
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  17. Ann P. Woodhull-McNeal (1987). Educating Women in Science Women in Science: A Report From the Field Jane Butler Kahle. BioScience 37 (7):515-516.score: 450.0
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  18. Corinne A. Moss-Racusin (2013). Gender Bias Also Contributes to the Attrition of Women in Science. BioScience 63 (5):318.score: 450.0
  19. Henry Etzkowitz & Namrata Gupta (2006). Women in Science: A Fair Shake? [REVIEW] Minerva 44 (2):185-199.score: 450.0
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  20. Carolyn Wells (1998). Emerging Equality: Women in Science Journeys of Women in Science and Engineering: No Universal Constants Susan A. Ambrose Kristin L. Dunkle Barbara B. Lazarus Indira Nair Deborah A. Harkus. [REVIEW] BioScience 48 (7):562-563.score: 450.0
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  21. Nessy Allen (1990). Australian Women in Science—a Comparative Study of Two Physicists. Metascience 8 (2):75-85.score: 450.0
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  22. Victoria McLane & Betty L. Heldman (1982). Keyworth and Women in Science. BioScience 32 (7):564-564.score: 450.0
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  23. Mariana Szapuova (2010). Reflections on Gender and Science Or From the Question of Women in Science to the Question of the Genter-Determined Science. Filozofia 65 (5):485-492.score: 450.0
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  24. Carolyn Wells (1998). Emerging Equality: Women in Science. BioScience 48 (7):562-563.score: 450.0
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  25. Ann P. Woodhull-McNeal (1987). Educating Women in Science. BioScience 37 (7):515-516.score: 450.0
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  26. Ida H. Stamhuis & Arve Monsen (2007). Kristine Bonnevie, Tine Tammes and Elisabeth Schiemann in Early Genetics: Emerging Chances for a University Career for Women. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 40 (3):427 - 466.score: 447.0
    The beginning of the twentieth century saw the emergence of the discipline of genetics. It is striking how many female scientists were contributing to this new field at the time. At least three female pioneers succeeded in becoming professors: Kristine Bonnevie (Norway), Elisabeth Schiemann (Germany) and the Tine Tammes (The Netherlands). The question is which factors contributed to the success of these women's careers? At the time women were gaining access to university education it had become quite the (...)
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  27. Nancy Tuana (1996). Revaluing Science: Starting From the Practices of Women. In. In Lynn Hankinson Nelson & Jack Nelson (eds.), Feminism, Science, and the Philosophy of Science. 17--35.score: 444.0
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  28. Hanne Andersen (2013). Women in the History of Philosophy of Science: What We Do and Do Not Know. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 3 (1):136-139.score: 444.0
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  29. Diana Sartori (1994). Women's Authority in Science. In Kathleen Lennon & Margaret Whitford (eds.), Knowing the Difference: Feminist Perspectives in Epistemology. Routledge.score: 444.0
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  30. Margit Pohl & Monika Lanzenberger (2008). How to Explain the Underrepresentation of Women in Computer Science Studies. In P. Brey, A. Briggle & K. Waelbers (eds.), Current Issues in Computing and Philosophy. Ios Press. 175--181.score: 444.0
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  31. Paola Govoni (2013). The Power of Weak Competitors: Women Scholars, “Popular Science,” and the Building of a Scientific Community in Italy, 1860s-1930s. [REVIEW] Science in Context 26 (3):405-436.score: 441.0
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  32. Paola Govoni (2000). Women in the History of Science Discuss Biography at Newnham College. NTM International Journal of History and Ethics of Natural Sciences, Technology and Medicine 8 (1):120-122.score: 438.0
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  33. Ann B. Shteir & Monica Brough (1998). Book Reviews-Cultivating Women, Cultivating Science. Flora's Daughters and Botany in England 1760-1860. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 20 (1):102-102.score: 438.0
     
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  34. Linda Williams (2003). Nietzsche's Women in The Gay Science. Philosophy Now 41:26-29.score: 435.0
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  35. Ida H. Stamhuis (2002). Women, Actors and Subjects in Science. Minerva 40 (2):211-213.score: 435.0
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  36. J. H. Van der Waals (2001). The Fate of Women in the Science Pipeline. Minerva 39 (3):353-358.score: 435.0
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  37. Harriet Zuckerman & Jonathan R. Cole (1975). Women in American Science. Minerva 13 (1):82-102.score: 435.0
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  38. Beth Baker (2011). Women Face More Hurdles in Science Careers, Survey Shows. BioScience 61 (1):88-88.score: 435.0
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  39. Frances L. Behnke (1983). Women's Struggles in Science Women Scientists in America: Struggles and Strategies to 1940 Margaret W. Rossiter. BioScience 33 (9):591-591.score: 435.0
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  40. Jacqueline Broad (2006). Enlightened Women in the History of Science. Metascience 15 (2):303-306.score: 435.0
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  41. Lorraine D. Douce, A. P. Bedker & E. J. Sparrow (2002). Women in Life Science Disciplines. BioScience 28:33-39.score: 435.0
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  42. Dorothy Stimson (1937). The Teaching of the History of Science in a Liberal Arts College for Women. Annals of Science 2 (4):460-464.score: 414.0
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  43. Gayle A. Buck, Vicki L. Plano Clark, Diandra Leslie‐Pelecky, Yun Lu & Particia Cerda‐Lizarraga (2008). Examining the Cognitive Processes Used by Adolescent Girls and Women Scientists in Identifying Science Role Models: A Feminist Approach. Science Education 92 (4):688-707.score: 414.0
  44. Bat-Ami Bar On, Laura Cannon & Ann Ferguson (2005). Linda Martin Alcoff is a Professor of Philosophy, Women's Studies, and Polit-Ical Science at Syracuse University. She Received Her Ph. D. At Brown Univer-Sity in 1987. She Publishes in the Areas of Epistemology and Social Identity. Barbara S. Andrew is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at William Paterson University. She has Published Articles on Simone de Beau Voir, Feminist. [REVIEW] In Barbara S. Andrew, Jean Clare Keller & Lisa H. Schwartzman (eds.), Feminist Interventions in Ethics and Politics: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 414.0
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  45. Sanjay K. Agarwal, Sylvia Estrada, Warren G. Foster, L. Lewis Wall, Doug Brown, Elaine S. Revis & Suzanne Rodriguez (2007). What Motivates Women to Take Part in Clinical and Basic Science Endometriosis Research? Bioethics 21 (5):263–269.score: 405.0
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  46. Elzbieta Pakszys (1994). The Philosophy of Science and Women's Issues in Poland: Possibilities and Obstacles Today. Metaphilosophy 25 (2-3):156-162.score: 405.0
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  47. Ann K. Sakai & Melissa J. Lane (1996). National Science Foundation Funding Patterns of Women and Minorities in Biology. BioScience 46 (8):621-625.score: 405.0
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  48. Helen King (1995). Women's Bodies L. A. Dean-Jones: Women's Bodies in Classical Greek Science. Pp. Ix+293. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1994. Cased, £30. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 45 (01):137-139.score: 405.0
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  49. French Arthurian Romance (2008). At the Intersection of Religion, Folklore, and Science: Women and Snakes in Old. Mediaevalia 29:37.score: 405.0
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  50. N. Theriot (forthcoming). Women's Voices in Nineteenth-Century Medical Discourse: A Step Toward Deconstructing Science. History and Theory: Feminist Research, Debates, Contestations.score: 405.0
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