Search results for 'Women in science' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  11
    National Committee for Research Ethics in Science & Technology (2009). Guidelines for Research Ethics in Science and Technology. Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 14 (1).
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  2. William R. Shea, International Council of Scientific Unions, International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science & Universidade de Coimbra (1988). Revolutions in Science Their Meaning and Relevance. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  3. Angela Johnson, Sybol Cook Anderson & Kathryn J. Norlock (2009). A Moral Imperative: Retaining Women of Color in Science Education. Atlantis: Critical Studies in Gender, Culture and Social Justice 33 (2):72-82.
    This article considers the experiences of a group of women science students of color who reported encountering moral injustices, including misrecognition, lack of peer support, and disregard for their altruistic motives. We contend that university science departments face a moral imperative to cultivate equal relationships and the altruistic power of science.
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  4.  22
    Naonori Kodate, Kashiko Kodate & Takako Kodate (2010). Mission Completed? Changing Visibility of Women's Colleges in England and Japan and Their Roles in Promoting Gender Equality in Science. Minerva 48 (3):309-330.
    The global community, from UNESCO to NGOs, is committed to promoting the status of women in science, engineering and technology, despite long-held prejudices and the lack of role models. Previously, when equality was not firmly established as a key issue on international or national agendas, women’s colleges played a great role in mentoring female scientists. However, now that a concerted effort has been made by governments, the academic community and the private sector to give women equal (...)
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  5. Carole J. Lee (forthcoming). Revisiting Current Causes of Women's Underrepresentation in Science. In Jennifer Saul Michael Brownstein (ed.), Implicit Bias and Philosophy Volume 1: Metaphysics and Epistemology. Oxford University Press
    On the surface, developing a social psychology of science seems compelling as a way to understand how individual social cognition – in aggregate – contributes towards individual and group behavior within scientific communities (Kitcher, 2002). However, in cases where the functional input-output profile of psychological processes cannot be mapped directly onto the observed behavior of working scientists, it becomes clear that the relationship between psychological claims and normative philosophy of science should be refined. For example, a robust body (...)
     
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  6.  1
    Margaret Jacob & Dorothée Sturkenboom (2003). A Women’s Scientific Society In The West: The Late Eighteenth‐Century Assimilation of Science. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 94:217-252.
    The Natuurkundig Genootschap der Dames , formally established by and for women, met regularly from 1785 to 1881 and sporadically until 1887. It challenges our stereotypes both of women and the physical sciences during the eighteenth century and of the intellectual interests open to women in the early European republics. This essay aims not simply to identify the society and its members but to describe their pursuits and consider what their story adds to the history of Western (...)
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  7.  6
    Motoko Kuwahara (2001). Japanese Women in Science and Technology. Minerva 39 (2):203-216.
    Women make up about ten per cent of the scientists and engineers in Japan. The aim of this essay is to make clear why, even in the year 2001, there are so few women in these disciplines. I will suggest that the socio-economic structure and gender ideology of Japan since the Second World War is responsible for this shortage which is often erroneously attributed to the cultural traditions of feudal Japan.
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  8.  8
    Carol Kemelgor & Henry Etzkowitz (2001). Overcoming Isolation: Women's Dilemmas in American Academic Science. [REVIEW] Minerva 39 (2):153-174.
    Science is an intensely social activity. Professional relationships are essential forscientific success and mentors areindispensable for professional growth. Despitethe scientific ethos of universalism andinclusion, American women scientists frequentlyexperience isolation and exclusion at some timeduring their academic career. By contrast,male scientists enjoy informal but crucialsocial networks. Female scientists developnecessary strategies and defences, but manyleave or achieve less success in science whendeprived of necessary interpersonalconnections. There is indication that changewithin departments is occurring, but this isdependent upon institutional leadership.
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  9.  4
    Ilse Costas (2002). Women in Science in Germany. Science in Context 15 (4):557-576.
  10. Christine Min Wotipka & Francisco O. Ramirez (2003). Women in Science: For Development, for Human Rights, for Themselves. In Gili S. Drori (ed.), Science in the Modern World Polity: Institutionalization and Globalization. Stanford University Press
  11.  2
    Claudine Hermann & Franoise Cyrot-Lackmann (2002). Women in Science in France. Science in Context 15 (4):529-556.
  12. Anna Leuschner (2015). Social Exclusion in Academia Through Biases in Methodological Quality Evaluation: On the Situation of Women in Science and Philosophy. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 54:56-63.
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  13. Londa Schiebinger (2002). European Women in Science. Science in Context 15 (4):473-481.
  14.  2
    Mineke Bosch (2002). Women and Science in the Netherlands: A Dutch Case? Science in Context 15 (4):483-527.
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  15.  4
    Cassandra L. Pinnick (2008). Science Education for Women: Situated Cognition, Feminist Standpoint Theory, and the Status of Women in Science. Science and Education 17 (10):1055-1063.
  16.  1
    Marina Benjamin (1988). Uneasy Careers and Intimate Lives: Women in Science, 1789-1979, Ed. By Pnina Abir-Am and Dorinda Outram. History of Science 26:439-441.
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  17. M. Benjamin (1988). Essay Review: Women in Science: Uneasy Careers and Intimate Lives: Women in Science, 1789-1979. History of Science 26 (4):439-441.
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  18. Elizabeth Fee (1977). General Women in Science. By H. J. Mozans. Facsimile of 1913 Edition. Introduction by Mildred Dressenhaus. Cambridge, Mass., and London: M.I.T. Press, 1974. Pp. Xvii + 452. £2.50. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 10 (1):69.
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  19. Paula Gould (2003). CATHARINE M. C. HAINES with HELEN M. STEVENS, International Women in Science: A Biographical Dictionary to 1950. Santa Barbara, Denver and Oxford: ABC-CLIO, 2001. Pp. Xix+383. ISBN 1-57607-090-5. 44.95. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 36 (2):231-233.
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  20. Gillian Hudson (1992). Marilyn Bailie Ogilvie. Women in Science: Antiquity Through the Nineteenth Century. A Biographical Dictionary with Annotated Bibliography. Cambridge, Mass, and London: The MIT Press, 1988. Pp. Xiii + 254. ISBN 0-262-15031-X. £10.95. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 25 (2):292.
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  21. Dorinda Outram (1987). Margaret Alic. Hypatia's Heritage: A History of Women in Science From Antiquity to the Late Nineteenth Century. London: The Women's Press, 1986. Pp. Ix + 230. ISBN 0-7043-3954-4. £4.95. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 20 (2):224.
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  22. Sue V. Rosser (1986). The Relationship Between Women's Studies and Women in Science. In Ruth Bleier (ed.), Feminist Approaches to Science. Pergamon Press 165--80.
     
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  23.  54
    Henry Etzkowitz & Namrata Gupta (2006). Women in Science: A Fair Shake? [REVIEW] Minerva 44 (2):185-199.
  24. Nessy Allen (1990). Australian Women in Science—a Comparative Study of Two Physicists. Metascience 8 (2):75-85.
  25. Julia L. Epstein (1984). Women in Science: Portraits From a World in TransitionVivian Gornick. Isis 75 (3):578-579.
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  26. Ana Franchi, Jorge Atrio, Diana Maffia & Silvia Kochen (2008). Insertion of Women in Science and Technology in Argentina. Arbor 184 (733).
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  27. Judith R. Goodstein (2008). Raffaella Simili .Scienza a Due Voci.Xix + 372 Pp., Figs., Index. Florence: Leo S. Olschki, 2006. €38 .Valeria P. Babini; Raffaella Simili .More Than Pupils: Italian Women in Science at the Turn of the Twentieth Century.Xviii + 216 Pp. Florence: Leo S. Olschki, 2007. €24. [REVIEW] Isis 99 (1):164-165.
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  28. Louise S. Grinstein (2002). Marilyn Ogilvie; Joy Harvey .The Biographical Dictionary of Women in Science: Pioneering Lives From Ancient Times to the Mid‐Twentieth Century. Foreword by Margaret W. Rossiter. 2 Volumes. Xxxviii + Xxvii + 1,499 Pp., Indexes.New York/London: Routledge, 2000. $250, Can $375. [REVIEW] Isis 93 (1):170-170.
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  29. Sally Gregory Kohlstedt (2000). Ladies in the Laboratory? American and British Women in Science, 1800-1900Mary R. S. Creese Thomas M. Creese. Isis 91 (3):596-598.
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  30. Jane A. Miller (1987). Hypatia's Heritage: A History of Women in Science From Antiquity to the Nineteenth CenturyMargaret Alic. Isis 78 (1):96-97.
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  31. Marilyn Bailey Ogilvie (2001). American Women in Science: 1950 to the Present: A Biographical DictionaryMartha J. Bailey. Isis 92 (1):249-249.
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  32. Marilyn Bailey Ogilvie (2005). Mary R. S. Creese.Ladies in the Laboratory II: West European Women in Science, 1800–1900: A Survey of Their Contributions to Research. With Contributions by Thomas M. Creese. X + 290 Pp., Illus., App., Bibl., Index. Lanham, Md./Oxford: Scarecrow Press, 2004. $69.95. [REVIEW] Isis 96 (2):287-288.
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  33. Marilyn Ogilvie (2003). Pamela Proffitt .Notable Women Scientists. Xxvi + 668 Pp., Illus., Index. Framington Hills: Gale Group, 1999. $90.Catharine M. C. Haines .International Women in Science: A Biographical Dictionary to 1950. Xix + 383 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Santa Barbara: ABC‐CLIO, 2001.Linda Zierdt‐Warshaw; Alan Winkler; Leonard Bernstein .American Women in Technology: An Encyclopedia. Xviii + 384 Pp., Illus., Tables, Apps., Bibl., Index. Santa Barbara: ABC‐CLIO, 2000. $75. [REVIEW] Isis 94 (1):205-207.
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  34. Londa Schiebinger (1987). Maria Winkelmann at the Berlin Academy: A Turning Point for Women in Science. Isis 78 (2):174-200.
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  35. Mariana Szapuova (2010). Reflections on Gender and Science Or From the Question of Women in Science to the Question of the Genter-Determined Science. Filozofia 65 (5):485-492.
     
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  36.  11
    Ida H. Stamhuis & Arve Monsen (2007). Kristine Bonnevie, Tine Tammes and Elisabeth Schiemann in Early Genetics: Emerging Chances for a University Career for Women. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 40 (3):427 - 466.
    The beginning of the twentieth century saw the emergence of the discipline of genetics. It is striking how many female scientists were contributing to this new field at the time. At least three female pioneers succeeded in becoming professors: Kristine Bonnevie (Norway), Elisabeth Schiemann (Germany) and the Tine Tammes (The Netherlands). The question is which factors contributed to the success of these women's careers? At the time women were gaining access to university education it had become quite the (...)
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  37.  2
    Margit Pohl & Monika Lanzenberger (2008). How to Explain the Underrepresentation of Women in Computer Science Studies. In P. Brey, A. Briggle & K. Waelbers (eds.), Current Issues in Computing and Philosophy. Ios Press 175--181.
  38.  5
    Hanne Andersen (2013). Women in the History of Philosophy of Science: What We Do and Do Not Know. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 3 (1):136-139.
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  39.  1
    Diana Sartori (1994). Women's Authority in Science. In Kathleen Lennon & Margaret Whitford (eds.), Knowing the Difference: Feminist Perspectives in Epistemology. Routledge
  40. Nandini Bhattacharya (2011). Neelam Kumar , Women and Science in India: A Reader. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2009. Pp. Xxx+351. ISBN 978-0-19-569705-6. £21.99. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 44 (2):305-306.
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  41. Joy Harvey (1998). Ann B. Shteir, Cultivating Women, Cultivating Science: Flora's Daughters and Botany in England 1760 to 1860. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996. Pp. Xi+301, Illus. ISBN 0-8018-5141-6. £25.00. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 31 (1):63-102.
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  42. Paola Govoni (2013). The Power of Weak Competitors: Women Scholars, “Popular Science,” and the Building of a Scientific Community in Italy, 1860s-1930s. [REVIEW] Science in Context 26 (3):405-436.
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  43.  4
    Harriet Zuckerman & Jonathan R. Cole (1975). Women in American Science. Minerva 13 (1):82-102.
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  44.  12
    Linda Williams (2003). Nietzsche's Women in The Gay Science. Philosophy Now 41:26-29.
  45.  4
    Jacqueline Broad (2006). Enlightened Women in the History of Science. Metascience 15 (2):303-306.
  46.  4
    J. H. Van der Waals (2001). The Fate of Women in the Science Pipeline. Minerva 39 (3):353-358.
  47.  3
    Ida H. Stamhuis (2002). Women, Actors and Subjects in Science. Minerva 40 (2):211-213.
  48.  1
    Dorothy Deremer (1990). January Inquiry Workshop: Networking: Involving Women in Mathematics and Science. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 5 (1):4-4.
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  49. Paola Govoni (2000). Women in the History of Science Discuss Biography at Newnham College. NTM International Journal of History and Ethics of Natural Sciences, Technology and Medicine 8 (1):120-122.
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  50. Ann Hibner Koblitz (1987). Women Scientists From Antiquity to the Present: An IndexCaroline L. HerzenbergWomen in Science, Antiquity Through the Nineteenth Century: A Biographical Dictionary with Annotated BibliographyMarilyn Bailey Ogilvie. Isis 78 (2):315-316.
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