Search results for 'Women's rights Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Shari Stone-Mediatore (2004). Women's Rights and Cultural Differences. Studies in Practical Philosophy 4 (2):111-133.score: 714.0
    The rights of women in fundamentalist Muslim countries has become a cause celebre for many North American women; however, the problem of how to balance respect for women's rights and respect for cultural differences remains in dispute, even within feminist theory. This paper explores how U.S. feminists who are serious about supporting the struggles of women across cultural borders might best adjudicate the seeming tension between women's rights and cultural autonomy. Upon examining 4 representative approaches (...)
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  2. Jennifer Warriner (2011). The Future of Political Theory? A Review of Toward a Humanist Justice: The Political Philosophy of Susan Moller Okin. Edited by Debra Satz and Rob Reich and Women's Rights as Multicultural Claims: Reconfiguring Gender and Diversity in Political Philosophy. By Monica Mookherjee. Hypatia 26 (4):864-871.score: 603.0
  3. Peter Jones (2012). Women's Rights as Multicultural Claims: Reconfiguring Gender and Diversity in Political Philosophy. Contemporary Political Theory 11 (1):e5 - e7.score: 603.0
  4. Kristen Hessler (2013). Hard Cases: Philosophy, Public Health, and Women's Human Rights. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 47 (4):375-390.score: 594.0
  5. Natalie Fuehrer Taylor (2006). The Rights of Woman as Chimera: The Political Philosophy of Mary Wollstonecraft. Routledge.score: 564.0
    The land of chimeras -- Rousseau's half-being -- Navigating the land of chimeras with our only star & compass -- John Locke's other half being -- Nature does nothing in vain -- The foundation of almost every social virtue -- In a word, a better citizen.
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  6. Don Browning (2003). Feminism, Family, and Women's Rights: A Hermeneutic Realist Perspective. Zygon 38 (2):317-332.score: 552.0
    In this article I apply the insights of hermeneutic realism to a practical-theological ethics that addresses the international crisis of families and women’s rights. Hermeneutic realism affirms the hermeneutic philosophy of Hans-Georg Gadamer but enriches it with the dialectic of participation and distanciation developed by Paul Ricoeur. This approach finds a place for sciences such as evolutionary psychology within a hermeneutically informed ethic. It also points to a multidimensional model of practical reason that views it as implicitly or (...)
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  7. Anthony Luyirika Kafumbe (2010). Women's Rights to Property in Marriage, Divorce, and Widowhood in Uganda: The Problematic Aspects. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 11 (2):199-221.score: 535.5
    This article examines women’s rights to property in marriage, upon divorce, and upon the death of a spouse in Uganda, highlighting the problematic aspects in both the state-made (statutory) and non-state-made (customary and religious) laws. It argues that, with the exception of the 1995 Constitution, the subordinate laws that regulate the distribution, management, and ownership of property during marriage, upon divorce, and death of a spouse are discriminatory of women. It is shown that even where the relevant statutory laws (...)
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  8. Toma Birmontienė & Virginija Jurėnienė (2009). Development of Women's Rights in Lithuania: Recognition of Women Political Rights. Jurisprudence 116 (2):23-44.score: 522.0
    The article discusses the problems of development of women’s political rights in Lithuania in the legal historical aspect starting from the 16th century, when some property and individual rights were enshrined in the first codifications of the laws of the Great Duchy of Lithuania. The aim of the article is to show that women’s struggle for political equality and suffrage at the end of the 19th and at the turn of the 20th century correlates with the movement for (...)
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  9. Anne C. Bellows (2003). Exposing Violences: Using Women's Human Rights Theory to Reconceptualize Food Rights. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (3):249-279.score: 519.8
    Exposing food violences – hunger,malnutrition, and poisoning from environmentalmismanagement – requires policy action thatconfronts the structured invisibility of theseviolences. Along with the hidden deprivation offood is the physical and political isolation ofcritical knowledge on food violences and needs,and for policy strategies to address them. Iargue that efforts dedicated on behalf of ahuman right to food can benefit from thetheoretical analysis and activist work of theinternational Women's Rights are Human Rights(WRHR) movement. WRHR focuses on women andgirls; the food (...)
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  10. Tania Pouwhare & Emily Grabham (2008). “It's Another Way Of Making A Really Big Fuss” Human Rights And Women's Activism In The United Kingdom: An Interview With Tania Pouwhare. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 16 (1):97-112.score: 519.8
    Following the “Encountering Human Rights” conference in January 2007, Emily Grabham interviewed Tania Pouwhare, a women’s rights activist working at the Women’s Resource Centre in London. Their discussion engaged with the professionalisation of activism, funding constraints and New Labour policies and their impact on immigrant women. Against a background of financial insecurity and huge demand for their services, many women’s organisations in the United Kingdom struggle to use human rights law to advance women’s rights. Nevertheless, the (...)
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  11. Pragna Patel (2008). Faith in the State? Asian Women's Struggles for Human Rights in the U.K. Feminist Legal Studies 16 (1):9-36.score: 513.0
    The discourse of multiculturalism provides a useful means of understanding the complexities, tensions, and dilemmas that Asian and other minority women in the U.K. grapple with in their quest for human rights. However, the adoption of multiculturalist approaches has also silenced women’s voices, obscuring, for example, the role of the family in gendered violence and abuse. Focusing on the work of Southall Black Sisters, and locating this work within current debates on the intersection of government policy, cultural diversity, and (...)
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  12. Sohail H. Hashmi (2010). The Rights of Muslim Women: A Comment on Irene Oh's the Rights of God. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (3):588-593.score: 506.3
    This review of Irene Oh's The Rights of God focuses on women's rights in Islamic theory and practice. Oh suggests that religious establishments, and the texts they disseminate, often press believers to recognize and reject social problems, such as racial and gender discrimination. Islamic scholars and texts have played a more ambiguous role in efforts to recognize women's rights within Muslim states. Modernist intellectuals have used Islamic texts to support the advancement of women's (...), but members of the more conservative religious establishment have typically curbed or rejected these efforts. Muslim women themselves have established various responses to the question of Islam's compatibility with women's rights. While some embrace the value and compatibility of both, others reject the propriety of either Western conceptions of rights, or the Islamic tradition, as harmful for women. Muslim reformers and feminists have much to learn from comparative studies with other faith communities that have undergone similar struggles and transformations. (shrink)
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  13. Jalil Safaei (2012). Democracy, Human Rights and Women's Health. Mens Sana Monographs 10 (1):134.score: 506.3
    Significant improvements in human rights and democracy have been made since the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights by the United Nations in 1948. Yet, human rights, especially women's rights, are still being violated in many parts of the developing world. The adverse effects of such violations on women's and children's health are well known, but they are rarely measured. This study uses cross-national data from over 145 countries to estimate the impact (...)
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  14. G. B. Levey (2003). Multicultural Jurisdictions: Cultural Differences and Women's Rights. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (1):144 – 146.score: 480.0
    Book Information Multicultural Jurisdictions: Cultural Differences and Women's Rights. By Ayelet Shachar. Cambridge University Press. Cambridge. 2001. Pp. xiv + 193. Hardback, Aus.$140. Paperback, $48.95.
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  15. N. Guessous (2012). Women's Rights in Muslim Societies: Lessons From the Moroccan Experience. Philosophy and Social Criticism 38 (4-5):525-533.score: 480.0
    Major changes have taken place in Muslim societies in general during the last decades. Traditional family and social organizational structures have come into conflict with the perceptions and needs of development and modern state-building. Moreover, the international context of globalization, as well as changes in intercommunity relations through immigration, have also deeply affected social and cultural mutations by facilitating contact between different cultures and civilizations. Of the dilemmas arising from these changes, those concerning women’s and men’s roles were the most (...)
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  16. Christopher Robert Kaczor (2010). The Ethics of Abortion: Women's Rights, Human Life, and the Question of Justice. Routledge.score: 438.8
    Appealing to reason rather than religious belief, this book is the most comprehensive case against the choice of abortion yet published.
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  17. Nora Fisher Onar & Hande Paker (2012). Towards Cosmopolitan Citizenship? Women's Rights in Divided Turkey. Theory and Society 41 (4):375-394.score: 434.3
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  18. Niaz A. Shah (2005). The Constitution of Afghanistan and Women's Rights. Feminist Legal Studies 13 (2):239-258.score: 434.3
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  19. Penny Van Esterik (1999). Right to Food; Right to Feed; Right to Be Fed. The Intersection of Women's Rights and the Right to Food. Agriculture and Human Values 16 (2):225-232.score: 420.8
    This paper explores conceptual and practical linkages between women and food, and argues that food security cannot be realized until women are centrally included in policy discussions about food. Women's special relationship with food is culturally constructed and not a natural division of labor. Women's identity and sense of self is often based on their ability to feed their families and others; food insecurity denies them this right. Thus the interpretation of food as a human right requires that (...)
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  20. Sari Kouvo (2008). A “Quick and Dirty” Approach to Women's Emancipation and Human Rights?1. Feminist Legal Studies 16 (1):37-46.score: 416.3
    During the past decade, women’s and human rights ‘language’ has moved from the margins to the ‘mainstream’ of international law and politics. In this paper, the author argues that while feminists and human rights activists criticise the ‘mainstream’s interpretation of women’s and human rights, ‘we’ do not question what becoming part of the mainstream and the cosmopolitan classes has meant for us. Drawing on examples of how women’s and human rights arguments have been used in the (...)
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  21. Marie-Luisa Frick (2014). The Cultural Defense and Women's Human Rights An Inquiry Into the Rationales for Unveiling Justitia's Eyes to 'Culture'. Philosophy and Social Criticism 40 (6):555-576.score: 402.0
    In our era of globalization, migration increasingly enforces cultural heterogeneity at the level of single societies and countries mirroring the cultural heterogeneity at the macroscopic level, i.e. the planet. Thus, the question of intercultural understanding and coexistence not only is crucial when it comes to states, but is increasingly gaining in importance in terms of identifying preconditions that enable individuals from various cultural backgrounds to share one commonwealth. At present, a growing number of people are convinced that this challenge is (...)
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  22. Helen E. Lees (2013). Is R.S. Peters' Way of Mentioning Women in His Texts Detrimental to Philosophy of Education? Some Considerations and Questions. Ethics and Education 7 (3):291 - 302.score: 396.0
    (2012). Is R.S. Peters' way of mentioning women in his texts detrimental to philosophy of education? Some considerations and questions. Ethics and Education: Vol. 7, Creating spaces, pp. 291-302. doi: 10.1080/17449642.2013.767002.
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  23. Rosemarie Tong (2001). Towards a Feminist Global Bioethics: Addressing Women's Health Concerns Worldwide. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 9 (2):229-246.score: 380.3
    In this paper I argue that a global bioethicsis possible. Specifically, I present the viewthat there are within feminist approaches tobioethics some conceptual and methodologicaltools necessary to forge a bioethics thatembraces the health-related concerns of bothdeveloping and developed nations equally. Tosupport my argument I discuss some of thechallenges that have historically confrontedfeminists. If feminists accept the idea thatwomen are entirely the same, then feministspresent as fact the fiction of the essential``Woman.'' Not only does ``Woman'' not exist,``she'' obscures important racial, ethnic,cultural, (...)
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  24. Urszula Chowaniec & Marzenna Jakubczak (2012). Conceptualizing Generation and Transformation in Women’s Writing. ARGUMENT 2 (1):5-15.score: 378.0
    The main objective of this collection of papers is to explore ideas of generation and transformation in the context of postdependency discourse as it may be traced in women’s writing published in Bengali, Polish, Czech, Russian and English. As we believe, literature does not have merely a descriptive function or a purely visionary quality but serves also as a discursive medium, which is rhetorically sophisticated, imaginatively influential and stimulates cultural dynamics. It is an essential carrier of collective memory and a (...)
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  25. Helga Varden (2012). A Feminist, Kantian Conception of the Right to Bodily Integrity: The Cases of Abortion and Homosexuality. In Sharon Crasnow & Anita Superson (eds.), Out of the Shadows: Analytical Feminist Contributions to Traditional Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 375.0
    Pregnant women and persons engaging in homosexual practices compose two groups that have been and still are amongst those most severely subjected to coercive restrictions regarding their own bodies. From an historical point of view, it is a recent and rare phenomenon that a woman’s right to abortion and a person’s right to engage in homosexual interactions are recognized. Although most Western liberal states currently do recognize these rights, they are under continuous assault from various political and religious movements. (...)
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  26. Tameshnie Deane (2010). Cross-Border Trafficking in Nepal and India—Violating Women's Rights. Human Rights Review 11 (4):491-513.score: 371.3
    Human trafficking is both a human rights violation and the fastest growing criminal industry in the world. This article examines cross-border trafficking of girls and women in Nepal to India. It gives a brief explanation of what is meant by trafficking and then looks at the reasons behind trafficking. In Nepal, women and children are trafficked internally and to India and the Middle East for commercial sexual exploitation or forced marriage, as well as to India and within the country (...)
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  27. Sylvia Tamale (2008). The Right to Culture and the Culture of Rights: A Critical Perspective on Women's Sexual Rights in Africa. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 16 (1):47-69.score: 364.5
    The opposition of ‘culture’ and ‘rights’ is not uncommon in feminist legal discourse. This article argues that such an approach is fraught with danger as it creates an extremely restrictive framework within which African women can challenge domination; it limits our strategic interventions for transforming society and essentially plays into the hands of those seeking to perpetuate and solidify the existing structures of patriarchy. Drawing examples from a parallel research on Gender, Law and Sexuality, I propose that a more (...)
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  28. Sirkku Kristiina Hellsten (2000). Women's Rights and Reproductive Health Care in a Global Perspective. Journal of Social Philosophy 31 (4):382–390.score: 363.0
  29. A. Shachar (1998). Group Identity and Women's Rights in Family Law: The Perils of Multicultural Accommodation. Journal of Political Philosophy 6 (3):285–305.score: 363.0
  30. Melanie P. Mejia (2008). Gender Jihad: Muslim Women, Islamic Jurisprudence, and Women's Rights. Kritike: An Online Journal of Philosophy 1 (1).score: 363.0
  31. Temma Kaplan (2000). Women's Rights Are Human Rights. Studies in Practical Philosophy 2 (1):50-63.score: 363.0
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  32. Serene J. Khader (2008). When Equality Justifies Women's Subjection: Luce Irigaray's Critique of Equality and the Fathers' Rights Movement. Hypatia 23 (4):pp. 48-74.score: 360.0
    The “fathers’ rights” movement represents policies that undermine women’s reproductive autonomy as furthering the cause of gender equality. Khader argues that this movement exploits two general weaknesses of equality claims identified by Luce Irigaray. She shows that Irigaray criticizes equality claims for their appeal to a genderneutral universal subject and for their acceptance of our existing symbolic repertoire. This article examines how the plaintiffs’ rhetoric in two contemporary “fathers’ rights” court cases takes advantage of these weaknesses.
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  33. Jill Marshall (2008). Women's Right to Autonomy and Identity in European Human Rights Law: Manifesting One's Religion. Res Publica 14 (3):177-192.score: 357.8
    Freedom of religious expression is to many a fundamental element of their identity. Yet the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights on the Islamic headscarf issue does not refer to autonomy and identity rights of the individual women claimants. The case law focuses on Article 9 of the European Convention on Human Rights, which provides a legal human right to freedom of religious expression. The way that provision is interpreted is critically contrasted here with the (...)
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  34. Ani Casimir (2013). The Concept of Feminist Justice in African Philosophy: A Critical Exposition of Dukor's Propositions on African Cultural Values. Open Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):178.score: 354.0
    Having taken note of, and critically analyzed, Professor Maduabuchi Dukor’s epochal work entitled“Theistic Humanism of African philosophy-the great debate on substance and method of philosophy”(2010), I am much encouraged and rationally convinced that he has succeeded in building the core critical and essential foundational pillars of what can safely pass for professional African philosophy, though much remains to be done by way of further research from other scholars. Based upon that conviction and the great prospects that the (...)
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  35. Jane Freedman (2008). Women's Right to Asylum: Protecting the Rights of Female Asylum Seekers in Europe? [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 9 (4):413-433.score: 353.3
    Criticisms have been made against international laws and conventions on asylum and refugees, arguing that these have been based on a male model of definition, which have ignored women’s persecutions. This article will argue that recent developments in European asylum policy have the potential to deepen this discrimination and to further reduce the rights of female asylum seekers. Although there have been some positive developments in jurisprudence that have recognised that gender-specific persecution may be the basis for granting asylum, (...)
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  36. ’Dejo Olowu (2006). A Critique of the Rhetoric, Ambivalence, and Promise in the Protocol to the African Charter on Human and People's Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa. Human Rights Review 8 (1):78-101.score: 353.3
    The desire to formulate a viable treaty framework for women’s rights that will meet the challenges of the sociocultural peculiarities in Africa led to the emergence of the original draft Protocol to the African Charter on Human and People's Rights on the Rights of Women in the twilight years of the Organization of African Unity (OAU). Without doubt, the recent adoption of the African Women’s Protocol by the Assembly of African Heads of State and Government in July (...)
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  37. Christien van den Anker (2006). Trafficking and Women's Rights: Beyond the Sex Industry to 'Other Industries'. Journal of Global Ethics 2 (2):163 – 182.score: 351.0
    In this article I put forward three lines of argument. Firstly, the current debate on trafficking in human beings focuses narrowly on exploitation in the sex industry. This has produced a stand-off between moralists and liberals which is detrimental to developing strategies to combat trafficking. Moreover, this narrow focus leads to missing out the large numbers of women who are trafficked into other industries. It also masks some of the root causes of trafficking. In this article I therefore compare the (...)
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  38. Sandra Reineke (2008). In Vitro Veritas: New Reproductive and Genetic Technologies and Women's Rights in Contemporary France. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (1):91 - 125.score: 351.0
    This study examines recent French bioethics laws governing the uses of new reproductive and genetic technologies (NRGTs)—including in-vitro fertilization, surrogate motherhood, prenatal diagnostics, sex selection, and cloning—in light of feminist claims to women's rights, especially a woman's right to reproductive freedom. To this end, the study explores two interrelated questions: First, to what extent have French feminists supported NRGT development and treatment? Second, to what extent do French national bioethics debates, laws, and policies reflect feminist reactions to NRGTs? (...)
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  39. Ayelet Shachar (2001). Multicultural Jurisdictions: Cultural Differences and Women's Rights. cambridge university press.score: 351.0
    Cultural Differences and Women's Rights Ayelet Shachar. (drawing on a group's desire to maintain property within the community), and the state might hold the authority over demarcation (drawing on state traditions to protect the status of ...
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  40. Eileen Hunt Botting & Sean Kronewitter (2012). Westernization and Women's Rights: Non-Western European Responses to Mill's Subjection of Women, 1869-1908. Political Theory 40 (4):466 - 496.score: 351.0
    The publication in 1869 of Mill's Subjection ofWomen gave rise to philosophical and political responses beyond Western Europe on the relationship between Westernization and women's rights in developing, colonial, and post-colonial countries. Through the first comparative study of the Subjection of Women alongside the forewords to six of its earliest non-Western European editions, we explore how this book provoked local intellectuals in Russia, Chile, and India to engage its liberal utilitarian, imperial, Orientalist, and feminist ideas. By showing how (...)
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  41. María Pía Lara (2004). Globalizing Women's Rights: Overcoming the Apartheid. Thesis Eleven 78 (1):61-84.score: 351.0
    This article deals with the empirical example of how social subjects, in this case women, have appropriated the language of rights in order to demand social inclusion. Since there are many different points of view in feminist theory with regard to how to deal with the idea of women’s rights, this article is divided into three sections. In the first section, I focus on how some important normative contents about democracy and rights have already been accepted by (...)
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  42. Jill Lovecy (2002). Gender Mainstreaming and the Framing of Women's Rights in Europe: The Contribution of the Council of Europe. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 10 (3):271-283.score: 351.0
    Drawing on published materials from the Committee of Ministers, Assembly and expert working groups of the Council of Europe, this paper investigates the distinctive contribution made to the framing of women's rights over the last two decades by this regional organisation, which recent studies of the `Europeanisation' of public policies have largely neglected. Elements of congruence are identified between the major mobilising themes of second wave feminism and the Council's emphasis on protecting individual rights, and its sensitivity (...)
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  43. Caitlin Guse (2010). 'Take Your Rosaries Out of Our Ovaries:' Women's Rights in Argentina and Bolivia. Constellations 1 (2).score: 351.0
    Despite being neighbouring countries, Bolivia and Argentina appear to be a world apart in terms of economics, international relations, and women’s rights. Historically, women’s rights have been fairly similar in both countries, but while one country seemingly made “progress,” the other country appeared to be stagnating. By exploring violence against women, and the current state of contraception and abortion laws it becomes apparent that “progress” does not necessarily bring about social change.
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  44. Susan Moller Okin (1998). Feminism, Women's Human Rights, and Cultural Differences. Hypatia 13 (2):32 - 52.score: 344.3
    The recent global movement for women's human rights has achieved considerable re-thinking of human rights as previously understood. Since many of women's rights violations occur in the private sphere of family life, and are justified by appeals to cultural or religious norms, both families and cultures (including their religious aspects) have come under critical scrutiny.
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  45. Lorraine Dennerstein & Margret M. Baltes (eds.) (2000). Women's Rights and Bioethics. Unesco.score: 344.3
    This book, based on the Round Table on Bioethics and Women held at UNESCO during the Fourth Session of the International Bioethics Committee (IBC), presents the ...
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  46. R. Yoshida (2011). Ireland's Restrictive Abortion Law: A Threat to Women's Health and Rights? Clinical Ethics 6 (4):172-178.score: 342.0
    The Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights has recently handed down its judgement in the case of three women contesting the abortion law in the Republic of Ireland, which has one of the most restrictive abortion laws in the world. Although the Court ruled that Ireland had to clarify the current law following the success of one of the three claims, the failure of the other two claims allows Ireland to continue to enforce its law, which (...)
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  47. Teresa Genevieve Wojcik & Connie Titone (2013). Student Responses to the Women's Reclamation Work in the Philosophy of Education. Educational Studies 49 (1):32-44.score: 342.0
    Reclamation work denotes the process of uncovering the lost contributions of women to the philosophy of education, analyzing their works, making them accessible to a larger audience, and (re)introducing them to the historical record and canon. Since the 1970s, scholars have been engaged in the reclamation work, thus making available to students, professors, and researchers a rich and varied perspective for tracing the evolution of educational thought. This article shares the responses of undergraduate and graduate students to discussing the (...)
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  48. Virginia Ashby Sharpe (2002). Review of Cynthia R. Daniels, At Women's Expense: State Power and the Politics of Fetal Rights. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 2 (1):65-66.score: 342.0
    (2002). Review of Cynthia R. Daniels, At Women's Expense: State Power and the Politics of Fetal Rights. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 2, No. 1, pp. 65-66.
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  49. Saba Bahar (1996). Human Rights Are Women's Right: Amnesty International and the Family. Hypatia 11 (1):105 - 134.score: 339.8
    This essay examines why the recent recognition of human rights violations against women, as exemplified by Amnesty International's 1995 report on women, remains bound to the limitations of traditional approaches to human rights. The essay argues that despite Amnesty International's commitment to incorporating violations against women into its activities, it nevertheless upholds questionable assumptions about the gendered subject, gender relations within the family, and the relationship between the family and the state.
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