Search results for 'World Health' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ilona Kickbusch, Wolfgang Hein & Gaudenz Silberschmidt (2010). Addressing Global Health Governance Challenges Through a New Mechanism: The Proposal for a Committee C of the World Health Assembly. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (3):550-563.score: 120.0
    The field of global health has reached a critical juncture, where both its visibility and the complexity of its challenges are unprecedented. The World Health Organization, as the only global health actor possessing both democratic and formal legal legitimacy, is best positioned to capitalize on this new, precarious situation in public health and respond with the governance innovation that is needed to bring the increasingly chaotic network of activities and entities affecting health outcomes under (...)
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  2. Alison Bashford (2006). Global Biopolitics and the History of World Health. History of the Human Sciences 19 (1):67-88.score: 120.0
    Many scholars have historicized biopolitics with reference to the emergence of sovereign nations and their colonial extensions over the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. This article begins to conceptualize and trace the history of biopolitics beyond the nation, arguing that the history of world health - the great 20th-century reach of 19th-century health and hygiene - should be understood as a vital politics of population on a newly large field of play. This substantive history of world (...)
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  3. Daniel M. Hausman, Yukiko Asada & Thomas Hedemann (2002). Health Inequalities and Why They Matter. Health Care Analysis 10 (2):177-191.score: 114.0
    Health inequalities are of concern both becausestudying them may help one learn how to improvehealth and because health inequalities may beunjust. This paper argues that attending tothese reasons why health inequalities may beimportant undercuts the claims of researchersat the World Health Organization in favor offocusing on individual health variation ratherthan on social group health differences. Inequalities in individual health are of littleinterest unless one goes on to study how theyare related to other (...)
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  4. Yukiko Asada (2006). Is Health Inequality Across Individuals of Moral Concern? Health Care Analysis 14 (1):25-36.score: 114.0
    The history of the documentation of health inequality is long. The way in which health inequality has customarily been documented is by comparing differences in the average health across groups, for example, by sex or gender, income, education, occupation, or geographic region. In the controversial World Health Report 2000, researchers at the World Health Organization criticized this traditional practice and proposed to measure health inequality across individuals irrespective of individuals’ group affiliation. They (...)
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  5. A. G. Fraser (1977). Medical Migration and World Health. Journal of Medical Ethics 3 (4):179-182.score: 114.0
    Everyone knows that British doctors are emigrating and that other doctors, mostly from the third world, are immigrating to Britain. Also everyone thinks that he knows the reasons why. However, the Edinburgh Medical Group thought the various reasons for this medical migration should be examined more closely, and held a symposium (Chairman, Professor A S Duncan, Professor Emeritus of Medical Education in the University of Edinburgh) to examine the causes for medical migration at the present time. Medical teaching and (...)
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  6. Shawn H. E. Harmon (2009). International Public Health Law: Not so Much WHO as Why, and Not Enough WHO and Why Not? [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (3):245-255.score: 114.0
    To state the obvious, “health matters”, but health (or its equitable enjoyment) is neither simple nor easy. Public health in particular, which encompasses a broad collection of complex and multidisciplinary activities which are critical to the wellbeing and security of individuals, populations and nations, is a difficult milieu to master effectively. In fact, despite the vital importance of public health, there is a relative dearth of ethico-legal norms tailored for, and directed at, the public health (...)
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  7. Chhanda Chakraborti (2014). Systemic Negligence: Why It Is Morally Important for Developing World Bioethics. Developing World Bioethics 14 (2).score: 108.0
    In the context of clinical and non-clinical biomedical practices, negligence is usually understood as a lapse of a specific professional duty by a healthcare worker or by a medical facility. This paper tries to delineate systemic negligence as another kind of negligence in the context of health systems, particularly in developing countries, that needs to be recognized and addressed. Systemic negligence is not just a mere collection of stray incidences of medical errors and system failures in a health (...)
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  8. S. R. Benatar & Gillian Brock (eds.) (2011). Global Health and Global Health Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 102.0
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; Introduction; Part I. Global Health, Definitions and Descriptions: 1. What is global health? Solly Benatar and Ross Upshur; 2. The state of global health in a radically unequal world: patterns and prospects Ron Labonte and Ted Schrecker; 3. Addressing the societal determinants of health: the key global health ethics imperative of our times Anne-Emmanuelle Birn; 4. Gender and global health: inequality and differences Lesley Doyal and Sarah Payne; 5. (...)
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  9. David Barling (2007). Food Supply Chain Governance and Public Health Externalities: Upstream Policy Interventions and the UK State. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (3):285-300.score: 102.0
    Contemporary food supply chains are generating externalities with high economic and social costs, notably in public health terms through the rise in diet-related non-communicable disease. The UK State is developing policy strategies to tackle these public health problems alongside intergovernmental responses. However, the governance of food supply chains is conducted by, and across, both private and public spheres and within a multilevel framework. The realities of contemporary food governance are that private interests are key drivers of food supply (...)
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  10. Lisa Fuller (forthcoming). International NGO Health Programs in a Non-Ideal World: Imperialism, Respect & Procedural Justice. In E. Emanuel J. Millum (ed.), Global Justice and Bioethics. Oxford University Press.score: 96.0
    Many people in the developing world access essential health services either partially or primarily through programs run by international non-governmental organizations (INGOs). Given that such programs are typically designed and run by Westerners, and funded by Western countries and their citizens, it is not surprising that such programs are regarded by many as vehicles for Western cultural imperialism. In this chapter, I consider this phenomenon as it emerges in the context of development and humanitarian aid programs, particularly those (...)
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  11. I. V. Carvalho (2009). Our Common Enemy: Combatting the World's Deadliest Viruses to Ensure Equity Health Care in Developing Nations. Zygon 44 (1):51-63.score: 96.0
    In a previous issue of Zygon (Carvalho 2007), I explored the role of scientists—especially those engaging the science-religion dialogue—within the arena of global equity health, world poverty, and human rights. I contended that experimental biologists, who might have reduced agency because of their professional workload or lack of individual resources, can still unite into collective forces with other scientists as well as human rights organizations, medical doctors, and political and civic leaders to foster progressive change in our (...). In this article, I present some recent findings from research on three emerging viruses—HIV, dengue, and rotavirus—to explore the factors that lead to the geographical expansion of these viruses and the increase in frequency of the infectious diseases they cause. I show how these viruses are generating problems for geopolitical stability, human rights, and equity health care for developing nations that are already experiencing a growing poverty crisis. I suggest some avenues of future research for the scientific community for the movement toward resolution of these problems and indicate where the science-religion field can be of additional aid. (shrink)
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  12. Nicole Hassoun (2012). Global Health Impact: A Basis for Labeling and Licensing Campaigns? Developing World Bioethics 12 (3):121-134.score: 96.0
    Most of the world's health problems afflict poor countries and their poorest inhabitants. There are many reasons why so many people die of poverty-related causes. One reason is that the poor cannot access many of the existing drugs and technologies they need. Another, is that little of the research and development (R&D) done on new drugs and technologies benefits the poor. There are several proposals on the table that might incentivize pharmaceutical companies to extend access to essential drugs (...)
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  13. Teri Chettiar (2012). Democratizing Mental Health Motherhood, Therapeutic Community and the Emergence of the Psychiatric Family at the Cassel Hospital in Post-Second World War Britain. History of the Human Sciences 25 (5):107-122.score: 96.0
    Shortly following the Second World War, and under the medical direction of ex-army psychiatrist T. F. Main, the Cassel Hospital for Functional Nervous Disorders emerged as a pioneering democratic ‘therapeutic community’ in the treatment of mental illness. This definitive movement away from conventional ‘custodial’ assumptions about the function of the psychiatric hospital initially grew out of a commitment to sharing therapeutic responsibility between patients and staff and to preserving patients’ pre-admission responsibilities and social identities. However, by the mid-1950s, hospital (...)
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  14. Shelley Morrisette, William D. Oberman, Allison D. Watts & Joseph B. Beck (2013). Health Care: A Brave New World. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis:1-18.score: 96.0
    The current U.S. health care system, with both rising costs and demands, is unsustainable. The combination of a sense of individual entitlement to health care and limited acceptance of individual responsibility with respect to personal health has contributed to a system which overspends and underperforms. This sense of entitlement has its roots in a perceived right to health care. Beginning with the so-called moral right to health care (all life is sacred), the issue of who (...)
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  15. Cristina Richie (2014). Global Health Care Justice, Delivery Doctors and Assisted Reproduction: Taking a Note From Catholic Social Teachings. Developing World Bioethics 14 (2).score: 96.0
    This article will examine the Catholic concept of global justice within a health care framework as it relates to women's needs for delivery doctors in the developing world and women's demands for assisted reproduction in the developed world. I will first discuss justice as a theory, situating it within Catholic social teachings. The Catholic perspective on global justice in health care demands that everyone have access to basic needs before elective treatments are offered to the wealthy. (...)
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  16. Neil Arya & Joanna Santa Barbara (eds.) (2008). Peace Through Health: How Health Professionals Can Work for a Less Violent World. Kumarian Press.score: 90.0
    Those considering careers in medicine and other health and humanitarian disciplines as well as those concerned about the growing presence of militarized ...
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  17. Chesmal Siriwardhana, Anushka Adikari, Kaushalya Jayaweera & Athula Sumathipala (2013). Ethical Challenges in Mental Health Research Among Internally Displaced People: Ethical Theory and Research Implementation. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):13-.score: 90.0
    Millions of people undergo displacement in the world. Internally displaced people (IDP) are especially vulnerable as they are not protected by special legislation in contrast to other migrants. Research conducted among IDPs must be correspondingly sensitive in dealing with ethical issues that may arise. Muslim IDPs in Puttalam district in the North-Western province of Sri Lanka were initially displaced from Northern Sri Lanka due to the conflict in 1991. In the backdrop of a study exploring the prevalence of common (...)
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  18. Margaret P. Battin (2008). Angela Ballantyne has a BSc in Genetics and a PhD in Bioethics. She has Worked for the World Health Organization (Geneva), Imperial College London (UK), Monash University, and Flinders University (Australia). Her Interests Include Research Ethics, Global Health, Exploitation, Genethics, and Public Health Ethics. [REVIEW] International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (1).score: 90.0
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  19. John J. Carvalho (2007). The Scientist as Statesman: Biologists and Third World Health. Zygon 42 (2):289-300.score: 90.0
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  20. Joses Kirigia, Charles Wambebe & Amido Baba-Moussa (2005). Status of National Research Bioethics Committees in the WHO African Region. BMC Medical Ethics 6 (1):1-7.score: 90.0
    Background The Regional Committee for Africa of the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2001 expressed concern that some health-related studies undertaken in the Region were not subjected to any form of ethics review. In 2003, the study reported in this paper was conducted to determine which Member country did not have a national research ethics committee (REC) with a view to guiding the WHO Regional Office in developing practical strategies for supporting those countries. Methods This is a (...)
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  21. A. M. Brown (1970). Infant Nutrition in the Sub-Tropics and Tropics. By D. B. Jellife. Pp. 336. (Second Edition: World Health Organization, Geneva, 1968. Monograph Series, No. 29). Price 54s. [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 2 (1):85-87.score: 90.0
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  22. A. J. Davis (2001). Report of the World Health Assembly 2001. Nursing Ethics 8 (6):554-555.score: 90.0
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  23. Elena Godina (2004). Children in the New Millennium: Environmental Impact on Health. By UNEP, UNICEF & WHO. Pp. 142. (World Health Organization, 2002.) SwFr 15.00, 92–4-159016–5, Paperback. [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 36 (6):741-742.score: 90.0
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  24. Elena Godina (2002). Reduction of Maternal Mortality. A Joint WHO/UNFPA/UNICEF/World Bank Statement. Pp. 40, Available in English, French and Spanish. (World Health Organization, Geneva, 1999.) US$12.60, ISBN 92-4-156195-5. [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 34 (2):287-288.score: 90.0
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  25. Christine Hallett & Lis Wagner (2011). Promoting the Health of Europeans in a Rapidly Changing World: A Historical Study of the Implementation of World Health Organisation Policies by the Nursing and Midwifery Unit, European Regional Office, 1970-2003. Nursing Inquiry 18 (4):359-368.score: 90.0
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  26. Stanley J. Ulijaszek (2003). Obesity: Preventing and Managing the Global Epidemic. Report of a WHO Consultation. WHO Technical Report Series 894. Pp. 252. (World Health Organization, Geneva, 2000.) SFr 56.00, ISBN 92-4-120894-5, Paperback. [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 35 (4):624-625.score: 90.0
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  27. Paul Weindling (1997). Philanthropy and World Health: The Rockefeller Foundation and the League of Nations Health Organisation. Minerva 35 (3):269-281.score: 90.0
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  28. P. F. Basch (1989). Biomedical Innovation and World Health. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 33 (4):501-508.score: 90.0
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  29. Karen M. Booth (1998). National Mother Global Whore and Transnational Femocrats: The Politics of AIDS and the Construction of Women at the World Health Organization. Feminist Studies 24 (1):115-39.score: 90.0
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  30. This Essay Was Written Before March (1994). When Trials of RU486 Began in Melbourne and Sydney Under the Auspices of the World Health Organisation's Human Reproduction Program. See Melinda Tankard Reist,(1994) RU486 Trials-Controversy in Australia. [REVIEW] Bioethics Research Notes 6 (3):25-26.score: 90.0
     
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  31. J. P. Jardel (1993). Distinguished Guests and Colleagues, Ladies and Gentlemen. The Director-General of the World Health Organization, Dr Hiroshi Nakajima, Absent From Geneva, has Asked Me to Represent Him Today at the Beginning of This Important Conference. It is Therefore My. In Zbigniew Bańkowski & Robert J. Levine (eds.), Ethics and Research on Human Subjects: International Guidelines: Proceedings of the Xxvith Cioms Conference, Geneva, Switzerland, 5-7 February 1992. Cioms. 2.score: 90.0
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  32. Tikki Pang (2011). Developing Medicines in Line with Global Public Health Needs: The Role of the World Health Organization. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (2):290-297.score: 90.0
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  33. Melissa Parker (2000). HIV and Infant Feeding. (World Health Organization, Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) and United Nations Children's Fund, 1998.) US $14.40. [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 32 (2):286-287.score: 90.0
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  34. Melissa Parker (2000). Integrated Management of Childhood Illness: A WHO/UNICEF Initiative. Supplement No. 1 to Volume 75 of the Bulletin of the World Health Organization. Pp. 128. (World Health Organization, Geneva, 1997.) US $18, ISBN 92-4-068750-5. [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 32 (3):421-432.score: 90.0
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  35. Democratic Party (2004). The Week in Europe is Frequently Concerned with Health Issues. One of These Appeared in July: The European Commission and the World Health Organization Have Agreed a Strategic. Nursing Ethics 11 (6).score: 90.0
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  36. W. Rudowski (1980). World Health Organisation Biomedical Research Guidelines and the Conduct of Clinical Trials. Journal of Medical Ethics 6 (2):58-60.score: 90.0
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  37. Udo Schuklenk & Peter Sy (2007). Health : Developing World Health Issues. In Jesper Ryberg, Thomas S. Petersen & Clark Wolf (eds.), New Waves in Applied Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 90.0
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  38. Aj Voelke (1991). Health of the World, Health of the Individual, Marcus-Aurelius'ad Se Ipsum Libri XII'v-8. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 45 (178):322-335.score: 90.0
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  39. D. A. Willoughby (1964). The Use of Vital and Health Statistics for Genetic and Radiation Studies. Proceedings of the Seminar Sponsored by the United Nations and the World Health Organization, Held in Geneva, September 5th-9th, 1960. [REVIEW] The Eugenics Review 55 (4):230.score: 90.0
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  40. Derek Yach (1998). Health and Illness: The Definition of the World Health Organization. [REVIEW] Ethik in der Medizin 10 (1):7-13.score: 90.0
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  41. Norman Daniels (2008). Just Health: Meeting Health Needs Fairly. Cambridge University Press.score: 84.0
    In this new book by the award-winning author of Just Healthcare, Norman Daniels develops a comprehensive theory of justice for health that answers three key questions: What is the special moral importance of health? When are health inequalities unjust? How can we meet health needs fairly when we cannot meet them all? The theory has implications for national and global health policy: Can we meet health needs fairly in aging societies? Or protect health (...)
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  42. Anand Kumar & Barry Smith (2007). The Ontology of Processes and Functions: A Study of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. In Sharing Knowledge through the ICF: 13th Annual North American WHO Collaborating Center Conference on the ICF, Niagara Falls, June 7, 2007. North American WHO Collaborating Center.score: 84.0
    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health provides a classification of human bodily functions, which, while exhibiting non-conformance to many formal ontological principles, provides an insight into which basic functions such a classification should include. Its evaluation is an important first step towards such an adequate ontology of this domain. Presented at the 13th Annual North American WHO Collaborating Center Conference on the ICF, 2007.
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  43. Aloysius Ochasi & Peter Clark (2014). Reuse Of Pacemakers In Ghana And Nigeria: Medical, Legal, Cultural And Ethical Perspectives. Developing World Bioethics 14 (2).score: 84.0
    According to the World Health Organization (WHO) cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death globally. Over 80% of CVD deaths take place in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). It is estimated that 1 million to 2 million people worldwide die each year due to lack of access to an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) or a pacemaker. Despite the medical, legal, cultural and ethical controversies surrounding the pacemaker reutilization, studies done so far on the reuse of postmortem (...)
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  44. Paula Lobato de Faria (ed.) (2006). The Role of Health Law, Bioethics, and Human Rights to Promote a Safer and Healthier World. Fundação Luso-Americana.score: 84.0
  45. David J. Rothman (2006). Trust is Not Enough: Bringing Human Rights to Medicine. New York Review Books.score: 84.0
    Addresses the issues at the heart of international medicine and social responsibility. A number of international declarations have proclaimed that health care is a fundamental human right. But if we accept this broad commitment, how should we concretely define the state’s responsibility for the health of its citizens? Although there is growing debate over this issue, there are few books for general readers that provide engaging accounts of critical incidents, practices, and ideas in the field of human rights, (...)
     
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  46. H. Tristram Engelhardt (2011). Core Competencies for Health Care Ethics Consultants: In Search of Professional Status in a Post-Modern World. HEC Forum 23 (3):129-145.score: 78.0
    The American Society for Bioethics and the Humanities (ASBH) issued its Core Competencies for Health Care Ethics Consultation just as it is becoming ever clearer that secular ethics is intractably plural and without foundations in any reality that is not a social–historical construction (ASBH Core Competencies for Health Care Ethics Consultation , 2nd edn. American Society for Bioethics and Humanities, Glenview, IL, 2011 ). Core Competencies fails to recognize that the ethics of health care ethics consultants is (...)
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  47. Fredrik Svenaeus (2000). Das Unheimliche €“ Towards a Phenomenology of Illness. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 3 (1):3-16.score: 78.0
    In this article I aim at developing a phenomenology ofillness through a critical interpretation of the worksof Sigmund Freud and Martin Heidegger. The phenomenonof ``Unheimlichkeit'' – uncanniness and unhomelikeness– is demonstrated not only to play a key role in thetheories of Freud and Heidegger, but also toconstitute the essence of the experience of illness.Two different modes of unhomelikeness – ``The minduncanny'' and ``The world uncanny'' – are in thisconnection explored as constitutive parts of thephenomenon of illness. The consequence I (...)
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  48. Fredrik Svenaeus (2000). The Body Uncanny — Further Steps Towards a Phenomenology of Illness. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 3 (2):125-137.score: 78.0
    This article is an attempt to analyse the experience of embodiment in illness. Drawing upon Heidegger' sphenomenology and the suggestion that illness can be understood as unhomelike being-in-the-world, I try to show how the way we live our own bodies in illness is experienced precisely as unhomelike. The body is alien, yet, at the same time, myself. It involves biological processes beyond my control, but these processes still belong to me as lived by me. This a priori otherness of (...)
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  49. Craig Blinderman (2009). Palliative Care, Public Health and Justice: Setting Priorities in Resource Poor Countries. Developing World Bioethics 9 (3):105-110.score: 78.0
    Many countries have not considered palliative care a public health problem. With limited resources, disease-oriented therapies and prevention measures take priority. In this paper, I intend to describe the moral framework for considering palliative care as a public health priority in resource-poor countries. A distributive theory of justice for health care should consider integrative palliative care as morally required as it contributes to improving normal functioning and preserving opportunities for the individual. For patients requiring terminal care , (...)
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  50. Gopal Sreenivasan (2007). Health and Justice in Our Non-Ideal World. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 6 (2):218-236.score: 78.0
    In this article, I explore some advantages of viewing well-being in terms of an individual's health status. Principally, I argue that this perspective makes it easier to establish that rich countries at least have an obligation to transfer 1 percent of their GDP to poor countries. If properly targeted at the fundamental determinants of health in developing countries, this transfer would very plausibly yield a disproportionate `bang for the buck' in terms of individual well-being. This helps to explain (...)
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